Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

What kind of critter is this?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by MeekandMild, Apr 29, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. MeekandMild

    MeekandMild Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,877
    Traveling north up to the Tennessee Valley, we saw several critters on the side of the road (live, not road kill). They are about the size of a swamp rat (nutria) but don't have the big long yellow teeth and their fur is a lighter, almost chestnut color. We did not see their tails but the notable absence of a nutria rat tail and beaver flat tail was obvious. Ears were little rounded things like rat ears not at all rabbit-like. More than anything they looked like big double sized guinea pigs.

    These critters appeared to be grazing on the side of the road! What were they?:confused:
     
  2. Bruz

    Bruz Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    448
    Location:
    Pismo Beach, California (Central Coast)
    Sounds like a Piecost to me...
     
  3. Mal H

    Mal H Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Messages:
    17,432
    Location:
    Somewhere in the woods of Northern VA
    No! Stop! Don't ask! ;)

    Actually I did see a Piecost pictured on a Grecian Urn at the Smithsonian. They've been around for a long time.
     
  4. one-shot-one

    one-shot-one Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2003
    Messages:
    1,029
    Location:
    texas
    let me guess a piecost is much like a henway!?!?
     
  5. gun-fucious

    gun-fucious Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,977
    Location:
    centre of the PA
    groundhog
     
  6. shooter10mm

    shooter10mm Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2003
    Messages:
    33
    Location:
    Leesburg, GA
    You've witnessed the actual sighting of a groundhog, whistlepig, hedgehog whatever you wanna call 'em. They're loads of fun to shoot at long range!
     
  7. MeekandMild

    MeekandMild Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,877
    Groundhogs, eh? Well sunovagun! :D They did look a might pale to be Nutria!

    BTW, I hate to tell you yankees, but it looks like there were some 'dillos up there too, moving north. Didn't see any live ones, but these possum on a half shell were roasting on the centerline, slowly simmering to make a tasty treat for the vultures and crows.

    There is an obscure prophecy that once 'dillos reach the New York state line the world as we know it will end.
     
  8. Ol' Badger

    Ol' Badger Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2003
    Messages:
    856
    Location:
    Locked in a Condo in Falls Church VA.
    Musk Rat most likely. My Grandpa made me eat some once. Nasty stuff, but he seemed to enjoy it.
     
  9. winwun

    winwun Member

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2003
    Messages:
    225
    Location:
    Blount County in East Tennessee
    Groundhog, most definetly, and they can climb trees, too. My old Golden gave one the impetus to do just that about a year ago. They were rare around here in East Tennessee as little as 20 years ago, but they have bounded back with a vengeance. In fact, practically ALL wildlife has came back with a vengeance in that time. Seems like the more it grows up around here, the more foxes, coons, groundhogs, deer, etc. I see. I sort of like it, as long as they stay out of my garden. Oh, speaking of G-pigs, did you know that if you hold up a G-pig by its tail, its eyes will fall out?
     
  10. standingbear

    standingbear Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,133
    Location:
    ohio
    its eyes will fall out..lol

    is that before you have run over it or after?yea an if you hide behind a white sheet,you can sneak up on them and scare them into having a stroke.
     
  11. Dave McCracken

    Dave McCracken Moderator In Memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Messages:
    13,938
    Location:
    MD.
    Groundhogs can be shot from long range, or taken at close range with a shorter range weapon. Good practice with archery tackle,handguns like the 357 or MLs.

    22 LR is a little light for them,unless you're putting it right in the brain.22 mag works on body shots, but you want them to die before they make it back to their holes.

    Don't hunt them before June, some of the biggest ones are females, but by June the kits can make it on their own.

    BTW, they're delicious. Young ones can be fried like rabbits, older ones stewed or quartered, browned and simmered in tomato sauce. Either case, simmer until the meat comes off the bones, then remove the meat, debone and dice, add it back into the sauce/gravy.
     
  12. gun-fucious

    gun-fucious Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    1,977
    Location:
    centre of the PA
    the eternal question...
    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Watchman

    Watchman Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    303
    Location:
    Arkansas
    There is an obscure prophecy that once 'dillos reach the New York state line the world as we know it will end.

    Never happen. Dillos dont like the cold.

    Does that mean that TEOTAWKI will never happen ?

    Dang it...all that ammo for nothing...
    :scrutiny:
     
  14. MeekandMild

    MeekandMild Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,877
    They don't have to travel under their own power. Could be a Texan truck driver carrying his box lunch for all I know. :neener:



    This first step of browning sounds like it would be a good start for a roux if one put in some bacon fat. The tomato sauce (if chunky style) sounds a lot like Justin Wilson's starter for duck, crawfish and squirrel gumbo, then he puts in okra, spices, the roux, rice, et cetera.

    What else do you put into your stew?
     
  15. Dave McCracken

    Dave McCracken Moderator In Memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Messages:
    13,938
    Location:
    MD.
    The tomato sauce for pasta would have oregano, garlic,basil, a hint of fresh rosemary, and maybe a teaspoon of wine for the aroma.

    Stew, dredge the pieces in flour and brown in a bare non stick pan with just a little olive oil. Add a pat or two of butter after the browning to start the roux.

    Use a bit of beef suet to brown some carrots, celery and onion,maybe a few leftover Portobellos, then add venison or beef stock. A touch of fresh ground ginger, a few caraway seeds and a bay leaf go in now. Cover and simmer,not boil for a good hour. Add diced potatos and simmer another 30 minutes, then add a little corn,peas, and a half tsp of Kitchen Bouquet. Another 15 minutes and you're ready...
     
  16. Bruz

    Bruz Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    448
    Location:
    Pismo Beach, California (Central Coast)
    BTW, they're delicious.

    Reckon it depends on where you grow up, but round here I do not know one person that eats rodents...probably tastes great, especially the way you prepare it, then again pig anuses would probably taste great in your stew, but I would have to be perdy hungry to try it out! :scrutiny:
     
  17. standingbear

    standingbear Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,133
    Location:
    ohio
    what bruz said..lol

    im with him,i dont think i could eat one either.especially the mangy ones ive shot.
     
  18. Dave McCracken

    Dave McCracken Moderator In Memoriam

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Messages:
    13,938
    Location:
    MD.
    To each his own, guys. Rabbits are rodents also.
    Chucks eat grass, grain and fruit. The meat is a little like lean pork, a little like chicken, and delicious when cleanly killed and well prepared.

    Sometime, ask me why I don't eat catfish or possum...
     
  19. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    43,761
    Location:
    Terlingua, TX; Thomasville,GA
    Ah, Dave, the psychology of food!

    I was on a passenger-freighter that put in to a lumber port on the east coast of Luzon, back in 1950. Filipino kids would dive into the harbor waters, catching jellyfish and climbing back onto a wharf-piling to sit and eat the jelly portion...

    :), Art
     
  20. inGobwetrust

    inGobwetrust Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Messages:
    71
    Location:
    NH
    Sometime, ask me why I don't eat catfish or possum...

    I'm asking!
     
  21. Bruz

    Bruz Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    448
    Location:
    Pismo Beach, California (Central Coast)
    Rabbits are rodents also.

    Hmmm, good point. OK, I don't eat rodents unless they hop and have long ears!
     
  22. sm

    sm member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    28,389
    Location:
    Between black coffee, and shiftn' gears
    Dave - sounds as if you need to do a "Cooking Satori".

    Well we don't do Groundhogs here ( that I know of). We do have a BIG annual BBQ Coon supper in Gillette though. Tickets are sold way in advance, politicians 'stump', prison rodeo bands...

    Must be a demographics--word is years ago a fellow was selling a fancy fish croquoet (sp?) dish in NYC at $20.00...we called it Carp...one of those fish we throw back...ugly and full of bones.
     
  23. Chuck Dye

    Chuck Dye Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    938
    Location:
    Oregon-The wet side.
    Actually, rabbits, hares, and pikas are lagomorphs, Order Lagomorpha, and NOT rodents.
     
  24. Cadwallader

    Cadwallader Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2002
    Messages:
    42
    Groundhogs do indeed make tasty eating (don't tell my wife, she thinks they were pork or beef, depending on how I cooked them), especially when they've fattened up in early fall. I only take one occasionally, when they move in under a shed or woodpile and wear a path into the garden to feast on vegetables - they seem to enjoy the tomatoes as much as I do. I prefer to take head shots at close range: I lay down maybe ten yards downwind from the hole in late afternoon (the asparagus makes a perfect blind) and wait for piggie to stick his head out to look around. A subsonic .22 in the eye does it every time.

    I've tanned a few skins for various uses - their toughness is second only to squirrel skin, and the fur (guard hairs and undercoat) comes in handy for tying a number of fly patterns - a very useful animal indeed.

    They're protected on state land here in WI, and they seem to know it - I've run into several on the edges of woodlots, where they often climb a tree to about eye level to get a good look at me.
     
  25. MeekandMild

    MeekandMild Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,877
    Dave, in defence of the American catfish industry, farm raised fish eat commercial fish food mostyly soybean and corn based.

    Two other questions? Do you have to tenderize these critters or just simmer a long time? (I notice deer roast seems to do best if it is slow cooked or pressure cooked and deer is the only wild critter I usally cook.)

    Does it taste enough like pork to where it might do well in a pineapple, clove and cherry sauce? Mrs. Meek dislikes this but I think pork does well with it and those who have tried alligator in it tell me it does just as well.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page