what powder measure would you guys recommend?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by greyling22, Apr 2, 2021.

  1. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    10,696
    Location:
    East TN
    I have a Culver Custom 90 powder measure that works great with extruded powders. Not cheap though. There are several different variations of the powder measure for different applications.

    http://www.harrellsprec.com
     
    South Prairie Jim likes this.
  2. Trent

    Trent Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    25,246
    Location:
    Illinois
    My Lyman powder measure finally broke after 22 years of use.

    I had a backup, that I just took out of the box when setting up my new reloading area.

    Probably see me through another 20+ years.

    :)

    When I am reloading precision rifle I throw loads with that to get me close, then trickle in on an RCBS 10-10.

    When I'm loading not for absolute precision or doing test workups I just use it direct.

    When I'm trying to load a bunch of stuff quick I use the RCBS chargemaster w/ the auto trickler thingy (and a straw inserted in it, to fix the inconsistent drops)

    2bidTBz.jpg

    ^If you ever use a chargemaster with extruded powders, there's your trick of the day

    When I'm going for volume I use the Dillon 650.
     
    Mark_Mark likes this.
  3. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2021
    Messages:
    3,452
    the straw will make the extruded drop quicker?
     
  4. Dale Alan

    Dale Alan Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2017
    Messages:
    873
    It will make it more accurate as it trickles powder when approaching your target weight , less overthrows .
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2021
    South Prairie Jim and Mark_Mark like this.
  5. Archie

    Archie Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,229
    Location:
    Hastings, Nebraska - the Heartland!
    After trying a number of measures for over many, many winters, I think the Dillon measure with adjustable chambers seems to be the most uniform.

    Like everything else, it works better with spherical and small kernels of powder (those kernels fill the cavity more fully and pour the smoothest.) Is least uniform with the larger sizes of 'stick' powder (for exactly the opposite nature). But both seem to be as uniform as anything. In my experience, even the larger types of powder in rifles seem to be close enough for general use. Ultra precision shooters will want to 'trickle' the last bit.

    I don't think anything will suit a perfectionist. Make sure your scale does repeatable measurements.
     
    whughett likes this.
  6. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    6,995
    Location:
    Piney Woods of East Texas
    I moved to the ChargeMaster 1500, 5 yrs ago and never looked back. Faster than dumping low then dribbling up to what your after.
     
  7. CowboyTim

    CowboyTim Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2010
    Messages:
    95
    Location:
    Cazenovia, WI
    Been using the LEE Perfect Powder measure since I started reloading(little over 10 years), have been looking really hard lately at the Lyman Gen 6 for load work ups.
     
  8. mstreddy

    mstreddy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,890
    Location:
    SE Fla -- land of sunshine, liquid and otherwise.
    OP, strangely enough I use the Lee PPM with stick powders as I find it to be much more consistent than the RCBS Uniflow or the Hornady LNL measures.
     
  9. mstreddy

    mstreddy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,890
    Location:
    SE Fla -- land of sunshine, liquid and otherwise.
    OP, the Uniflow and the Hornady LNL are close enough to the same measures. If you're looking at ball powders, then either will work just fine. As to the newer RCBS or others, I can't say.
     
  10. Trent

    Trent Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    25,246
    Location:
    Illinois
    It makes the drop more consistent. Extruded tends to clump up in the tube that the chargemaster ships with. So when it does it's final trickle, it might drop on the money or 0.3 grains over.

    With the straw, it drops on the money, every single time.
     
  11. Trent

    Trent Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    25,246
    Location:
    Illinois
    Yup, indeed. Plus there's other things you can do while it meters powder! Lets you multitask.

    The only time I trickle and then measure on a beam scale (I use a 10-10) is for precision long range stuff, where it really matters.

    I have a lab scale (part of the day job) which reads and is certified to 0.1 mg, far more accurate than any of my reloading scales. It is accurate to 0.00154 grains (converting from mg).

    It's useful for double checking the other scales, though, if I haven't used them in a while.

    +/- 0.1 grain is very much "enough" for precision shooting. Never needed anything more accurate than that, considering 0.1 is good enough for SD 5 fps, given everything else being equalized and normalized across a batch (brass, etc). 0.1 grain is good enough to get in the x ring consistently at any distance, if everything else is working as it should :)

    One thing about digital scales, they will drift with temp.

    Turn them on several hours before your session, or leave them on, keeps them acclimated.

    Also useful to recalibrate every X rounds (as they will drift, over time). That RCBS chargemaster, I recalibrate it about every 100 rounds, to keep it on point.
     
    South Prairie Jim likes this.
  12. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    6,995
    Location:
    Piney Woods of East Texas
    The CM1500 I have does not loose calibration. I have not had to calibrate it in over 1 yr now. I check it every time with check weights and it's always on. It does drift the zero a little. But I re zero/rtare every 10 rounds or so.
     
  13. Trent

    Trent Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    25,246
    Location:
    Illinois
    Right, that's what I'm talking about is the zero drift. Over time, the more you re-zero, the more off your loads can get. It's worth checking it against a beam scale. After enough re-zeros I've seen it 0.3, 0.4, or 0.5 off of a control load that was tossed and set aside at the start of the session. Which that's on magnum rifle; the deviation is much less severe on lighter loads.

    The chargemaster (and other RCBS digital scales) are not precision instruments. They are "good enough" for doing a lot of loads fast.

    Beam scales can be (and if set up right, usually are) precision instruments. Although they can be touchy!

    The lab scale I have, that's certified to 0.1mg, is a precision instrument, lab grade. Your measure goes in to a chamber which is then closed, it is fully isolated environmentally.

    I don't need it for reloading though, because "good enough" is "good enough" :)
     
  14. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,391
    Location:
    Medina, Ohio USA
    Old-school answer:

    *Hollywood
    *Belding & Mull

    Newer measure:

    *Quick-Measure
     
  15. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    6,995
    Location:
    Piney Woods of East Texas
    One of the things l've learned about the CM is you want to keep the pan on the scale when not using it. It greatly minimize the drift.
     
  16. Trent

    Trent Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2010
    Messages:
    25,246
    Location:
    Illinois
    I'd also suspect temp would have a lot to do with it. My old reloading room was in the basement, and the room would warm as I occupied it. That always causes problems with digital scales. (Even the lab grade ones, you have to acclimate and keep the room tightly controlled). It wasn't quite as bad when I'd fire up a space heater a few hours before reloading, to get the room at a steady temp.

    I'm currently in the process of setting my gear up in the garage, at our new house, which has in-slab heat piping. It will have a lot less temp variance than that old basement did. :)

    The chargemaster got set up today, and calibrated. It'll be a while before I give it a run through, though. Have a long way to go before things are organized enough to try to load ammo!
     
  17. Waisting lead

    Waisting lead Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2021
    Messages:
    14
    I like my Hornady but I just wish I could find replacement parts for my dad's old Lachmiller.
    It's the only one that I ever saw that was consistent from start to finish.
     
  18. Lennyjoe

    Lennyjoe Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    7,193
    Location:
    Southwestern Ohio
    I still stand by this guy. For the price it’s served me well! 68B1C9F1-1062-42F5-BCBF-11CB69ABED6A.jpeg
     
  19. TEXASJD
    • Contributing Member

    TEXASJD Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2021
    Messages:
    301
    This for loading rifles
    http://www.neiljones.com/html/powder_measure.html
     
    South Prairie Jim likes this.
  20. Big Wes

    Big Wes Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2009
    Messages:
    111
    Location:
    Virginia
    I have a couple Harrells Powder Measures www.harrellsprec.com Premium and Shuetzen
     
  21. lightman

    lightman Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    2,405
    Location:
    england,ar
    If you have a powder measure I doubt that you will see much improvement by swapping to another.

    I have owned several and once I got used to one they all dropped powder with about the same accuracy. You just need to throw enough charges to get used to it. None of them worked well with extruded powder. I use a ChargeMaster for those powders. My Harrells is much smoother than any of the others but is not much more accurate. The thing about the Harrells is that its very repeatable. X number of clicks drops the same weight of powder next week as it does today. It looks better, feels better and is much smoother.
     
  22. greyling22

    greyling22 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2007
    Messages:
    6,129
    Location:
    East Texas
    I guess I was just not clear. I have no comoleints about the accuracy of the little lee measure. The uniflow has also been plenty accurate, and a little nicer to operate with a bigger hopper. I just want a 3rd measure. I tend to set them and leave them, and I didn't know if an locknload or a rcbs, or the nice lee or something in about that price range were significantly better than the others. But it sounds like the answer is "no, they're all about the same" which is fine. I'll probably buy the rcbs then. It costs a little more, but their warranty/customer service is outstanding.
     
  23. PWC

    PWC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2018
    Messages:
    1,101
    Location:
    Central AZ
     
  24. PWC

    PWC Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2018
    Messages:
    1,101
    Location:
    Central AZ
    I have an old orange Lyman 55, and it is just as Froggy says. I drop directly into case and seat the bullet on my 83 yr old Pacific "C" in 2 steps.

    Sometimes does go crunch...so what? I am not a competative shooter and can not tell any difference on my targets.

    Edit:
    Once the 55 is set up I drop directly into the case.

    I have also made custom scoops...work great, just be consistent in how you scoop.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2021
    FROGO207 likes this.
  25. Mr.Revolverguy

    Mr.Revolverguy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,736
    quick written and video review of digital RCBS and Intellidropper http://www.dayattherange.com/?p=6427

    These have really increased my output of my rifle rounds as I still load on a single stage press for rifle.

    I do love the Uniflow for non stick powders and use the rcbs505 with it.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice