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What really happens when you fan a SAA?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Leaky Waders, Mar 16, 2010.

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  1. Leaky Waders

    Leaky Waders Member

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    Hi,

    Looking at various guns and smiths, most people recommend not fanning the SAA or clone or even ruger styles.

    Why?

    What do gun smiths do to make it ok to fan the action? Is there any difference on the action when fanning it versus thumbing it?
     
  2. NG VI

    NG VI Member

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    Oh I misread this, I thought you were asking what happens when you become a fan of the SAA, I thought it was going to be a bunch of stories about spending all your money on SAA variants.
     
  3. Nicodemus38

    Nicodemus38 Member

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    thumbing the SAA, as with any revolver, allows the internals to cycle in the proper manner as they were designed for.

    fanning the gun is nothing more then manipulating the action in a manner that allows it to fire far faster then intended. As a result the increased stress on the mechanical parts leads to early failure.
    For example ive read that the typical factory built clone from uberti will be mechanically fine after 4,000 rounds of standard, NON fanning fire. Ive read that a brand new clone will need a complete rebuild of the internals in under 1000 shots when fanned for each shot.
     
  4. opr1945

    opr1945 Member

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    I am a fan of SAA. I have an old one but I would not fan it. I would imgine it would be hard to hit anything when slappping the gun. Plus it is probably hard on the mechanicals, especially as they are over 100 years old.

    Maybe on a new one.
     
  5. NG VI

    NG VI Member

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    I guess I also have to ask why you would want to? What would you expect to be able to hit like that?
     
  6. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    I may be mistaken but I "think" gunsmiths may cut the bolt notches deeper , put a "hardened" bolt stop in , ---- in addition , a true "fanner" will have a very modified hammer swept back towards the grip , a custom aluminum/alloy cylinder ---- most fanners are set up to shoot wax bullets or VERY mild handloads.

    And I also think that "fanning"per say -- does NOT hurt the gun ---- what I am saying is if you hold the trigger back and use your palm/fingers of your weak hand to fire the gun in a "REASONABLE" time frame ---- how can this be more abuseive then cocking it with your thumb ???

    BTW ---- I have "fanned" my Rugers at about 5 rds. in 3 seconds and scored all five hits on a chest size target at 10-15 yards. It took me about 500 rds. in practice to do this 4 out of 5 times consistintely
     
  7. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator

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    if you're referring to Quick Draw specialist, who fan their guns, the hammers are modified to stick straight up above the top strap (easier to catch) and they usually use aluminum barrels to reduce inertia during the draw

    http://www.gunfighter.com/graham/bg_fanning.jpg
     
  8. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    If you fan conventional Colt or clone single action you will soon batter out the shallow notches in the cylinder, and enlarge the window in the bottom of the frame where the ball on the bolt sticks through it. Ultimately you will ruin the gun.

    If you feel the need to shoot fast hold the revolver in both hands (if you are right handed) and cock the hammer with the left thumb. You will have plenty of time to do this while recovering from the recoil of each previous shot.
     
  9. DWFan

    DWFan Member

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  10. steven58

    steven58 Member

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    I cut my hand on the adjustable sight of Super Blackhawk that way:eek:

    I guess the gun was reminding me they were there and that maybe I should use them;)
     
  11. HoosierQ

    HoosierQ Member

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    Answer: Poorly placed shots.
     
  12. Noxx

    Noxx Member

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    Short answer? You break it. :D
     
  13. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Because you can slap the hammer about 50 times harder/faster then you can pull it back with your thumb.

    Because older designs like the Colt SAA & clones do not have a real positive hammer stop to prevent applying additional force to the hand after the cylinder stops turning & locks.

    A very well fitted one allows a tiny spot on the back of the hammer to contact the tiny V-shaped front of the grip frame cut at full cock.
    The last very well fitted one was made about 1920 something!

    Because fanning quickly beats out the tiny V-shaped contact point and allows the hammer to come back further & further.

    Because then when you slap the hammer back, you can't feel the hand getting tight at full lock-up and drive it past it's point of failure.

    Because you can rotate the cylinder to warp speed instantly when fanning, and the bolt has to stop it instantly while it is going faster then it was designed to go when thumb-cocked.

    Because this exerts additional side-loading on the bolt and thin bolt cut hole in the frame which accelerates wear on both parts.

    Guns modified for fanning must have a positive hammer stop added that hits the grip frame to them to prevent over-cocking past the cylinder lock-up point

    rc
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2010
  14. NG VI

    NG VI Member

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    Wonderful
     
  15. gesshots

    gesshots Member

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    You miss what you are aiming at and waste ammo.
    Gunsmiths reassess their labor charges. With the $1000.00
    plus cost of a good SSA, I would not advise putting
    undue wear on pawl/ratchet timing - very expensive to repair.
     
  16. nulfisin

    nulfisin Member

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    If you are just looking for thrills, take one of your autoloaders and bump-fire it. That can damage a gun, too, but not nearly as quickly.
     
  17. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    If you want to fan one, go get a Heritage .22 from Academy for $150 and do it to that. I've done it with .22s. It's fun, but you can't hit squat like that. Some can, but it takes hours of practice, and is only good for extremely short range.
     
  18. Leaky Waders

    Leaky Waders Member

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    Thanks RC that's the kind of answer I was looking for.

    And, as far as thumbing a SAA or clones? Does that cause any excessive wear? Or is it considered normal under factory configuration?

    I'm exploring how one would practice for the fastest double tap with a SAA or clone...
     
  19. dfariswheel

    dfariswheel Member

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    Normal cocking depends on how HARD you cock it.
    Most people who try to speed shoot with a Single Action tend to yank the hammer back with too much force, which is in some cases as much force as when fanning the gun.

    For fast shooting with a SAA, most shooters hold the gun with both hands and cock the hammer with the off hand thumb. The trick is to cock the hammer fast, but not HARD. This requires extensive practice.

    For exhibition shooters who fan, most have a minimum of three guns: One in use, one in reserve, and one in the shop being rebuilt.
    They also buy new guns fairly often to replace guns that are too badly worn to be rebuilt.
     
  20. Magnumite

    Magnumite Member

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    rc, where do they typically place the positive hammer stop you mentioned?

    Is that a lug or weld on the back of the hammer to stop at the cutout in the grip frame?
     
  21. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    An old timer gunsmith I'm friends with once had a Vaquero in his shop, I asked him what he was doing, he said; "Replacing the pin the hammer rocks on, because this guy thought it was ok to fan it like he saw in the movies. It's not just that he fanned it, he did it so much he was trying to actually become proficient at it."
     
  22. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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  23. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    Quote:
    how can this be more abuseive then cocking it with your thumb ???

    Because you can slap the hammer about 50 times harder/faster then you can pull it back with your thumb.

    Because older designs like the Colt SAA & clones do not have a real positive hammer stop to prevent applying additional force to the hand after the cylinder stops turning & locks.

    A very well fitted one allows a tiny spot on the back of the hammer to contact the tiny V-shaped front of the grip frame cut at full cock.
    The last very well fitted one was made about 1920 something!

    Because fanning quickly beats out the tiny V-shaped contact point and allows the hammer to come back further & further.

    Because then when you slap the hammer back, you can't feel the hand getting tight at full lock-up and drive it past it's point of failure.

    Because you can rotate the cylinder to warp speed instantly when fanning, and the bolt has to stop it instantly while it is going faster then it was designed to go when thumb-cocked.

    Because this exerts additional side-loading on the bolt and thin bolt cut hole in the frame which accelerates wear on both parts.

    Guns modified for fanning must have a positive hammer stop added that hits the grip frame to them to prevent over-cocking past the cylinder lock-up point

    rc
    __________________




    Hiya RC ----- I AGREE with what you posted ---- BUT --- you ONLY used part of my statement;

    The main word in that sentance is REASONABLE.
     
  24. NG VI

    NG VI Member

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    Then what would be the point?
     
  25. Gunfighter123

    Gunfighter123 Member

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    Point being that YOU CAN "hip shoot" or "fan" a single action revolver without "breaking it" ---- and what about the poor guy who lost his shooting THUMB ???

    There is at least two points for ya --:neener:
     
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