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What rifle did he use (British)

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by nutty7462, Jun 11, 2008.

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  1. nutty7462

    nutty7462 Member

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    What was the standard issue rifle for the British army during the 60s? Probably mid to late 60s? He said they called then SLRs, but didn't know anything beyond that.
     
  2. Limeyfellow

    Limeyfellow Member

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    The SLR (short for Self Loading Rifle) is the British version of the FN Fal. It is cut with an inch pattern, so it is a little different from many countries. Australia and many others commonwealth countries used the same.
     
  3. Robert

    Robert Moderator Staff Member

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    You are right on the SLR. If am not mistaken the SLR was British Army speak for what we know as the FN/FAL. Of course it would have been the inch model not the metric. But then again I could be wrong... wouldn't be the first time.
     
  4. Dienekes

    Dienekes Member

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    FAL SLR L1A1. Spent a little time with some Aussies in an exotic land once carrying one.

    Nice rifle. I probably ought to own one.
     
  5. MTMilitiaman

    MTMilitiaman Member

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    Yes, it was the Self-Loading Rifle or SLR, which was a version of the Belgian FN FAL that was very popular during that time period and into the 70s and even the 80s. It was called the "Right Arm of the Free World," for this reason. I believe the British used the inch pattern instead of the metric pattern receiver that was more popular. The rifle was so popular and adopted by so many countries that the British, armed with SLRs, fought Argentinans armed with SLRs when they retook to islands. Pretty much the only difference was the the British version lacked the capability to fire fully automatic (not uncommon among battle rifles), while the Argentine version could.

    Think 7.62x51mm gas operated, air cooled, short piston, tilting block firing from, typically, a detachable 20 round magazine.
     
  6. Coronach

    Coronach Moderator Emeritus

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    What they said. The SLR, aka L1A1, aka FN-FAL, aka Right Arm of the Free World. In the running for best battle rifle EVAR, and still in widespread use today in several corners of the world.

    Mike
     
  7. GunTech

    GunTech Member

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    SLRs we in used as late as the Falklands, where FAL fought FAL. The L1A1 was adopted around 1957, and served until replaced by the SA80 in 1985. Unlike the FAL, the L1A1 was semi-automatic only, with no provision for fully automatic fire.
     
  8. uk roe hunter

    uk roe hunter Member

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    the slr soldiered well into the 90's with some arms. the sa80 (L85a1)was issued piecemeal to the infantry first up then to other units. I used the SLR between 1988 and 1992. i found it accurate, super reliable, very tough. The replacement i carried round west belfast was flimsy, unreliable, more accurate upto 300 yards but the magazine used to drop off, it would only cycle 4 or 5 rounds before packing up.
    we used to do a defensive battle simulation where a section of men would be in a fortified position and the targets, that fell when hit, advanced in waves from 600 metres.
    I was an experienced shot as a lad and and my job in this exercise was to knock down the far away targets. I used to nail them, i loved it. the rifle used to get so hot i couldn't hold the forend with a bare hand.I use to hold the sling near the swivel. My rifle just never seemed to stop.
    when doing FIBUA (urban fighting) the rifle was good for knocking doors down etc. My training sgt was a naval gunfire observation officer. He went up tumbledown with the Scots guards. He was , as part of a special unit, issued with an M16 but changed back to an SLR. He told me that with the 7.62 weapon if you hit the enemy they went down and stayed down whereas sometimes it took 4 shots from the 5.56.
    I liked it. It was an awesome rifle in skilled hands in the defensive battle it was envisaged for it would have been commanding.

    uk
     
  9. everallm

    everallm Member

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    One thing that tended to differentiate the SLR/L1A1 from most other weapons of the time was that at a (relatively) early stage the weapon was issued with 4X optical sights, the SUIT (Sight, Unit, Infantry Trilux).

    Another solid, squaddie proof piece of kit I used to love. If you ran out of ammunition it acts as a very effective club.....:cool:
     
  10. nutty7462

    nutty7462 Member

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    Good info. Thanks! I was hoping that they didn't cost so much. Would have liked to have been able to get him one. Maybe someday.
     
  11. matt87

    matt87 Member

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    If you're in Britain, dream on.
     
  12. BruceB

    BruceB Member

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    Actually, the L1A1 (British nomenclature for their FAL) DOES have full-auto capability. requiring very little in the way of mods to fire full-auto. Years ago, the L1A1 was very common in Canada, and they all had the "safety sear" which is essential to FA function.

    Knowing a good bit about the rifle from my Canadian Army service (Canada was the first country to put the inch-pattern FAL into production and service), I found that all I needed for FA was a suitably-modified beer can pull tab..... hey, I SAID it was "years ago"!

    With the little piece of aluminum installed in the trigger-sear assembly, I had reliable full-auto function at about 800 rpm, but ONLY full-auto, and the thumb safety was non-functional. I judged the firing rate by comparison to my MG42 and Bren MGs, one faster at 1200 rpm and the other slower at about 500-600 rpm. A full-auto 10-pound 7.62 NATO is a handful, but firing from supported prone allowed reasonable effectiveness to maybe 100 yards in 3-round bursts on man-silhouettes. A BAR bipod mounted on the flash suppressor also steadied things quite nicely, adding a couple of pounds out front.

    It was fun, but certainly not practical.
     
  13. HoosierQ

    HoosierQ Member

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    Did Springfield Armory not make one of these for awhile. They don't seem to today. I thought they wanted to do for the FN-FAL what they still do for the M-14 in the way of the M1A.
     
  14. uk roe hunter

    uk roe hunter Member

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    i doubt it FN are belgium, or is it belgique? do springfield make browning stuff? if they do they might
     
  15. Float Pilot

    Float Pilot Member

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    Springfield Armory imported a semi auto version of the FN made in South America. I had a couple. Nothing to write home about, but they worked. Mine were metric pattern guns and not the Inch pattern SLR. Both were traded for M-1As which were Much more accurate than the South American FAL types.
    FAL type rifles were made in various countries via license.
     
  16. El Tejon

    El Tejon Member

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    nut, it was called the "mechanical musket". Who is the "he" that you reference? Family, friend, crazed ex-Squaddie living in your basement?:D

    Dek, if you buy one, you have to post a photo of you running around with your knees up and then saluting palm up!:D Right then, run like the clappers to the gun store.:p

    Fellow Hoosier, yes, they did. Called it the SAR-48. I had friends in the '80s that owned them. Decent weapons.

    FN is based in Belgium, but make stuff in different places, even Souf Cackalacky. The FNs that Springfield Armory marketed were South American receivers finished up in Illinois.
     
  17. Nolo

    Nolo Member

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    I heard the FAL was extremely reliable except in sand. Since I'm sure there are people here who've used an FAL in adverse conditions, can you tell me more?
     
  18. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    The stock FAL had a little trouble in the sand (what rifle doesn't, to a degree?). Most problems were fixed by adding sand cuts to the receiver.
     
  19. Nolo

    Nolo Member

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    I've seen those, how do they affect accuracy?
     
  20. Deer Hunter

    Deer Hunter Member

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    As far as I know it didn't affect the accuracy. Don't take my word for it, though. Check the FAL Files to be sure.
     
  21. everallm

    everallm Member

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    The sand cuts were/are shallow diagonal milling in the surface of the bolt carrier.

    Has no affect on the accuracy at all, just allows sand to be moved away from the action and reduce the possibility of binding.
     
  22. Limeyfellow

    Limeyfellow Member

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    The sand cuts work really well and don't effect accuracy. They also have a variable gas system, and you can just up the power to keep the fal soldiering on.

    DSArms is probably your best bet for a new Fal nowadays, but many FALs built with an Imbel reciever are fine rifles.

    I love them.
     
  23. Nolo

    Nolo Member

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    What is the inherent accuracy of the FAL like? I've heard tilting blocks are innacurate.
     
  24. Limeyfellow

    Limeyfellow Member

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    The same as any other battle rifle typically. 2-4 MOA. I seen some shoot better. Mine normally does 2 inches at a 100 yards. Some of the crappier builds such as Century Frankenfals may have a little less accuracy.

    They do have wonderful ergonomics though in my opinion.
     
  25. Nolo

    Nolo Member

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    Well, the M1A will get 1 MOA, if I remember correctly.
    And the G3 has the PSG version, which can get lower than 1 MOA (and is really heavy).
    I was moreso talking about the action, not individual rifles.
     
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