1. Bikerdoc's passing and how you can help

    As many of you know, bikerdoc- AKA Al Spiniello- is no longer with us. There are always extra expenses when someone passes. If you would like to contribute to support his family, please do so here: Bikerdoc GoFundMe page.

    (Note - this notice can be dismissed by clicking on the X in the upper right corner.)
    Dismiss Notice

What some people go through for cleaning 100 pices of brass!

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Rule3, Aug 31, 2021.

  1. The Glockodile

    The Glockodile Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2020
    Messages:
    381
    Rule3, Mark_Mark and Demi-human like this.
  2. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2016
    Messages:
    4,746
    Location:
    The Haymarsh, MI (Aka, Paradise.)
    Oh! That’s so cute! Look at that little guy!:D
    9 inch long rollers? Aww, that will fit even a medium sized peanut butter jar, maybe.;)

    These rollers are 22” long and one inch thick.
    I can sit on them, and if I would fit in the can, it could spin me.:)
    [​IMG]

    Way less than a thousand dollars, too. Less than $200 actually…:cool:


    Um, no.:feet:
     
    heyboy, Rule3 and cfullgraf like this.
  3. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    10,747
    Location:
    East TN
    Never under estimate the psych factor. If you feel good about your brass, you shoot better.

    I started out hand cleaning cases. Next was an ultrasonic cleaner.

    I finally got a vibrating tumbler and dry tumbled for the next 20 years or so. I added a wet tumbler and really like the results but prcessing the cases and pins is a pain.

    For wet tumbling, I have enough cases that I can process and dry cases and still have other clean cases ready to reload.

    I still do mostly dry tumbling. Shiny enough to keep me happy and makes me feel good about my reloads.

    So, use the case cleaning method that floats your boat.
     
    merlynski and rocirish like this.
  4. loose noose

    loose noose Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    Messages:
    3,445
    Location:
    Southern Nevada
    Like was said he several times before what ever floats your boat.
     
    mdi and cfullgraf like this.
  5. horseman1

    horseman1 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Messages:
    448
    Location:
    Colorado
    Thanks for the video. I think its fine and if that is part of the reloading process one enjoys, cool. My cases don't look nearly that fancy. I stick my brass in some old jars on a tumbler I slopped together in the barn in an hour with some walnut shells in the jars. Usually run 2 or 3 jars of different sizes and go to bed. But I still have to dump the walnut shells out of the cases (sometime) the next day! I dont get much bling, but they are clean and I can get to reloading pretty quickly without pouring that stuff in to my septic tank. I enjoy seeing how others accomplish the same tasks. His tumbler is much nicer than mine (which is made of old swap cooler parts). My primer pockets aren't that clean either.
     
  6. M-14

    M-14 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2020
    Messages:
    318
    Location:
    The woods of NH
    Wet tumbling is awesome for getting the primer pockets and inside of cases shiny clean. I have need for a wet system occasionally for doing especially heinous brass, but it's not often enough to justify. I just need to make friends with someone who does :D
     
  7. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    8,292
    Location:
    Florida

    It's not about "the size" it is all about how much money is spent. They have huge industrial ones. Money is no object.
    When you care enough to to clean the best!:)
     
    Demi-human likes this.
  8. JJFitch

    JJFitch Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2010
    Messages:
    492
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    20 years ago I borrowed a small cement mixer designed for small patches of plaster. The drum/container would hold about 10 gallons of product. At the time I got ground walnut in 40 pound bags for industrial use. I put a 5 gallon bucket of walnut in the drum and 2.5 gallons of brass after 2 hours the brass was spotless.
    Since then I moved and no longer have access to the mixer but I've considered buying my own.
    But instead I've gotten two additional vibratory cleaners for a total of 4! One, the bottom bearing is worn out and noisy! I usually only clean brass a couple of times a year but 3 cleaners will run 3-4 hours at a time. I'll end up with [email protected] 5 gallon buckets of clean brass, .223, 30-06, 9mm, 45acp, 44 mag, 357mag and 38 spl.

    Due to arthritis I've retired from competition and shoot way less than a few years ago!

    Shoot more clean less!

    Smiles,
     
    bluejay75 and Demi-human like this.
  9. Engineer1911

    Engineer1911 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2018
    Messages:
    101
    Location:
    Augusta, GA
    I simply refuse to spend more time cleaning brass than I spend in the shower cleaning my butt.

    I'm on the same batch of media I bought in 1996, granted it was a 40# bag of ground corn cobs and I just keep adding new stuff to the tumbler. Also have a 4 year old batch of Lizard Bedding from WalMart. Used drier sheet removes the trash while tumbling brass.
     
    doubleh and Rule3 like this.
  10. mdi

    mdi Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Messages:
    4,151
    Location:
    Orygun!
    Something I've always wondered, but didn't ask is "what purpose does pristine, glossy primer pocket or case interiors serve?". I understand the satasfaction (ego) factor but having been reloading fo 40 years, about 18 different calibers and rarely even cleaning a primer pocket and never cleaned a case interior, what's the reasoning? I like all aspects of reloading so a bit of extra work/fuss wouldn't bother me if there is an authentic reason for a process...
     
    Rule3 likes this.
  11. merlynski

    merlynski Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2009
    Messages:
    211
    Location:
    Eastern Plains of Colorado
    I find that looking for culls in a large lot of purchased range brass / once-fired brass much easier after a wet pin tumble with citric acid and Simple Green. Defects show up much better, headstamps are also easier to read for sorting, with bright shiny cases.
     
    Demi-human likes this.
  12. CQB45ACP

    CQB45ACP Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2020
    Messages:
    1,114
    Location:
    Northern Virginia at the Beltway
    For me I’m pretty sure it’s not ego but it might be pride (not to be confused with prideful). Polishing shoes comes to mind as being similar. Neither are necessary but both look sharp and you know the old saying: look sharp, act sharp, be sharp.
     
    ballman6711 and Demi-human like this.
  13. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2016
    Messages:
    4,746
    Location:
    The Haymarsh, MI (Aka, Paradise.)
    Clean primer pockets are easier to get primers to seat below flush in.:)
    It gives finer feedback back and saves finger knuckle strain while using a hand primer more than anything else.:thumbup:
     
  14. mdi

    mdi Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2007
    Messages:
    4,151
    Location:
    Orygun!
    Hmmm. Even before I I started tumbling (1980 or so) and reloading without cleaning primer pockets, I have have had no primer seating problems with a Lee Loader, a ram prime, 3 different hand primers, a Lee Bench prime, a few stock press priming tools, and an RCBS Auto prime. I took apart a primer in 1969 to see how they work and have had zero FTFs due to improper primer seating. A great many were pre-tumbling as I just wiped each case with a solvent dampened rag.

    Not condemning those that wet tumble, just my experience and gathering info...
     
    rocirish, Demi-human and Rule3 like this.
  15. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Messages:
    8,292
    Location:
    Florida
    Doesn't do diddly.

    Once, At Band Camp, I deprimed 100, 357 mag cases. Then used a primer pocket cleaner over a piece of fine linen paper. The amount of debris (or lack of) showed little to nothing. Simply not worth it. Inside of case cleaning is like trying to remove the carbon ring on the outside of a revolver cylinder. It is just gonna get fouled again. It doesn't make the powder burn any better.

    There is clean enough and then there is OCD clean!. I clean my brass, 2 hrs in a vibrator with fresh media (change it often) is good enough, It shines.
     
    mdi, Demi-human and .38 Special like this.
  16. Demi-human

    Demi-human Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2016
    Messages:
    4,746
    Location:
    The Haymarsh, MI (Aka, Paradise.)
    So you’ve never heard of this in the last 41 years?:)

    Pardon my disbelief. I can’t possibly be the first to not have potato farmer hands.:D


    Despite its perceived necessity or not, I clean my belly button too!:p
     
  17. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    2,826
    Location:
    New Mexico and Proud American
    I don't care a whit what anybody thinks of my reloads, or how they look to you. My eyes are dimmer now and shiny brass stands out and improves my attitude. It looks good to tired eyes.....everyone is welcome to look at what they want to, or spend their reloading time doing what they want to. I don't think what I do is OCD, but you're free to think and do what you want, hope you agree that I'm allowed do that too.

    My Thumblers Tumbler was one of the most worthwhile purchases to me, right up there with my presses and my 3D printer. No more poisonous dust to breath, 1/3 of the time needed to polish as my dry tumblers, and 5 minutes of cleanup work....sure beats what I used to have to do to make pickup or military brass look presentable. You think that's OCD, keep breathing the dust, still somewhat a free country. ;)

    And water spots? Never seen one......maybe it's the old eyes.....
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2021
    Demi-human and BiknSwans like this.
  18. Gone Hiking

    Gone Hiking Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2019
    Messages:
    87
    Shiny brass doesn't just look nicer, it's easier to read headstamps, see flaws, and is just cleaner to handle. I prefer to wet tumble in my Frankford Arsenal deal, but I don't go crazy. I use tap water, a shot of Dawn, and a dash of Lemi-shine I measure in the palm of my hand. I usually omit the brass pins unless the brass is filthy, as those are a headache to completely remove and gather up.

    In nice weather, I'll dry them outside. In winter, by the fireplace. When I'm in a rush, I'll dry them in the toaster oven that I use to powder coat cast bullets.

    My dry tumbler doesn't do nearly the job, even with walnut media. It's also a pain to sift and tap out all the tumbling media, doubly so to pick it out of the flash holes. I also only dump the media outside so I'm not breathing or spreading all that fine airborne media and residual lead dust through the house. I still use it though when I want clean and load brass immediately.
     
  19. Ranger99

    Ranger99 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2021
    Messages:
    395
    JMHO- I've never understood the reluctance
    to take the 3 + - seconds it takes to run
    a cheap tool like a Lee primer pocket
    cleaner in a case, or to closely visually
    inspect the flash hole and interior of each
    case. Of course, there's no hard and fast
    rules about case preparation, or we wouldn't
    even be commenting on the topic because
    it would have never been posted
     
  20. champ0608

    champ0608 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2013
    Messages:
    70
    Location:
    Arizona
    I spray mine with a garden hose and lay out on a towel to dry...and that's probably overkill.
     
  21. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    2,826
    Location:
    New Mexico and Proud American
    There are so many ways, and I've done most of them in the nearly 50 years I've played this game. If I dry tumble I clean pockets....many years using a hand tool, and more lately using a Trim Mate. More steps became necessary for me when I bought my progressives.....at least if I want to prime on one without stoppages.

    My progressives have an adjustable depth stop on the primer seat rod. That means if you want smooth sailing you want to use that Trim Mate to also uniform primer pocket depth, so the stop will seat every case the same depth. That said, I don't at all mind not having to clean the pockets too. For me wet tumbling is worthwhile for that alone.

    I like the eye candy to be sure, but it's not without other merits. Probably the only drawback to wet is it can be too clean and require the best lube you can find.....not imperial in my experience....which I used to prefer. (really referring to sizing hard brass like MG LC 7.62)

    I've been meaning to try a 10 minute dry tumble in clean corncob on a wet tumbled batch in a vibrator just to add the corncob's dry lube effect to the batch....but probably doesn't make sense if you are loading rifle.....pistol might benefit if you are used to sizing that without lube in carbide dies.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2021
  22. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2021
    Messages:
    4,017
    I still thing my idea of a car hub cap tumbler would work great! come home to shine brass after your commute
     
  23. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    7,106
    Location:
    Piney Woods of East Texas
    Your velocity is too high. All of the brass will be thrown out to the outer edge and stay there, till you stop. Once you start off again the process repeats.
     
    Gus Chiggins and Demi-human like this.
  24. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2021
    Messages:
    4,017
    not if you live in stop go traffic cities
     
  25. Mosin77

    Mosin77 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    592
    I’m a relatively new reloader, and I got started reading the hard bound Lee book. Richard Lee opines therein that cleaning brass is pretty much pointless, and that if you want a box of pretty brass the way to go is chucking them up in a drill and shining them up by hand. He also suggested that using the dry tumbling methods is likely to expose you to a lot more lead residue than you might otherwise get from your involvement in the shooting sports. I thought this was interesting because Lee is a big company in the loading world but I have never really heard this opinion anywhere else.

    As I mostly load black powder I pretty much restrain myself to throwing the empties in a mason jar with water and some dish soap.

    Shiny brass does serve one very good purpose at least though. It’s somewhat easier to find it in grass compared to dull, tarnished brass that tends to blend in.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice