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What temperature to cook off a primer?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by essayons21, Jul 8, 2011.

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  1. essayons21

    essayons21 Member

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    So I had a couple bags full of miscellaneous range-pickup brass, mostly .45 and .40. It was a muddy wet day, and it has been sitting in the bags for a few months (work has been keeping me busy), so needless to say it was all pretty gross. I tossed the lot of it in my ultrasonic cleaner to get most of the crud off before it goes in the resizing dies.

    After ultrasonic cleaning, I usually put my brass on a tray in the oven at 225 degrees for 15-20 minutes to dry it off.

    I just pulled the tray out of the oven and started sorting through it, and I found two live .22 LR rounds still hot from the oven. Yikes! I have no idea how they got in there, maybe when one of my shooting buddies was helping me pick up brass he threw them in there. I have been accused of being a notorious scrounger when it comes to brass and ammo, but I'm not so cheap that I pick out individual .22 LR rounds out of the mud.

    So the question is, at what temperature will most primers "cook off"? Apparently 225 is too low, I know that campfires (~1000 degrees) are hot enough.

    Anybody know?
     
  2. Owen Sparks

    Owen Sparks member

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    I left an open box of 50 rounds of .45ACP sitting in direct sunlight 1n 98 degree weather at a pistol match once. They got so hot that they were physically uncomfortable to handle and I almost could not load them onto my magazines because they were burning my fingers but they did not go off.
     
  3. ny32182

    ny32182 Member

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    The Mythbusters tested several rounds in an oven, and most cooked off at a registered temperature of about 400 degrees if I remember correctly. Not sure if that would be the primer or powder going first. Since the temp in the oven was increasing relatively rapidly I would suspect that the actual cookoff temp of the primer/powder would be slightly under the registered oven temp. Based on that info, I'd bet a steady state temp in the upper 300's would be close to the line.

    However, I'm sure it depends on the exact primer and powder in question, and personally I would not make a habit of sticking live rounds in the oven at 225.
     
  4. roadchoad

    roadchoad Member

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    edit -I was wrong...
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  5. roadchoad

    roadchoad Member

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    Found this on an old TFL thread

    Posted by Target Shooter:

     
  6. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    Well I am sure that you dried out those .22 rounds if they were wet previously.:D I would inspect my brass closer than you have been before that step in the future if it were me.;) Specially if friends are helping. When drying my brass I try to keep it at 125 degrees or less (sunlight if possible) if I can to reduce stress on the brass. Does this matter?? I am happier if I do it this way and my ammo is happier if I am careful when I make it.:D YMMV
     
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