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What to do without a permanent spot?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by M-14, Apr 2, 2020.

  1. M-14

    M-14 Member

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    So my things are trickling in, and supposedly today the big box of goodies arrives.

    I don't have room in the house for a permanent setup, suppose I could clear a spot in the garage, but I was thinking more along the lines of mounting the press on a platform and clamping it to a table in the house when In use. The garage of course, is subject to humidity and temp extremes, and the basement is cold and damp.

    Ideally, at some point when I can afford it, I could build a stand alone room with a raised floor down there that I could keep climate controlled.

    Whats your M.O. if you don't have a dedicated setup?

    Just trying to formulate a plan. Thanks.
     
  2. George P

    George P Member

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    A nice square tool stand with flared legs from the likes of Northern Tool or Harbor Freight; top is about 16 x 16 or close to that; compact enough to store in a closet
    serveimage?url=https%3A%2F%2Fencrypted-tbn0.gstatic.jpg
    Add a nice top. One thing I would strongly recommend whether you go this route or your mentioned one, is getting the press riser from Inline Fabrication for your model of press. That way it sits on top of whatever surface so there is no torque applied to any edge - heavy duty, US made and great folks to deal with; I have 3 of them

    slide_4.jpg
     
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  3. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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  4. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    You could set it up on a workmate on a peace of ply wood so it can be removed and folded up. Loonwulf had a thread on a portable bench.
     
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  5. mdi

    mdi Member

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    For a few years I had my bench press mounted on a piece of 2x12 about 3' long. I glued felt to the bottom and had a "padded" c-clamp to hold it to the kitchen table. Worked OK. but then I got a Work Mate. In my opinion, unless the ceiling is dripping water in the winter and the room goes above 120 degrees in the summer, the only problem is your comfort. I reloaded in a tin shed for several months and kept my components there also (about 100+ degrees in summer and down to low 40s in winter) and my components lasted several years. I keep my primers in a "Tupperware" type container, an "under the bed" storage box and my powders were in a 5 gal bucket with a tight lid. My solution to "no place to reload"; DSCN0285.JPG
     
  6. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    When I lived in my first house it was under 1000 sq ft. I scavenged some boards from a construction site burn pile and made a decent little getup after busting a few roadside wonder end tables. The pieces I scavenged were all about 3 ft long 2x6 pine boards and when screwed together in a U shape made for a nice solid vertical part. Half a board across the top and bottom and then legs extending forward completed the bench. I had room for a lee perfect powder measure, RCBS JR2, and an coffee can or MTM box to hold my rounds as I batch loaded them. Coffee cans for WIP and MTM boxes as rounds were finished. It was the smallest and sturdiest setup I have seen that I thought was fully functional. I made several thousand rounds on that pedestal type bench, and it was just wide enough that when using it I could put my legs on either side of the upright and be comfortable. I would use it for a while then pick it up and carry it into the spare room for storage.
     
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  7. possumbelly220

    possumbelly220 Member

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    I have my setup on a small rolling tool chest, which stays in the garage. It has three drawers that I keep dies, molds, etc. in. The open bottom I keep brass and bullets in. Powder and primers stay in the house in a closet. I put together a couple of 2x6s and bolted them to the top for mounting my press and lubrisizer. Works for me very well.
     
  8. TonyAngel

    TonyAngel Member

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    I was in your jam at one time. You mentioned that you have a garage. I put together a portable rig with a flat plate at the bottom that I could park one my cars tires on. When getting to work, I’d just roll the car onto it and it was very stable. The one I made was only deep enough to accommodate my press but wide enough that I could get two tires on it. When done, I threw it on the side of the house until next time. I kept it shallow so that I could use c clamps to fasten the press(es) to the table.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2020
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  9. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    Was there at one time. What I did was take a board 4' long and bolted the press to it. Then I used c-clamps and secured it to the kitchen table OVER a LEG. It must be over a leg for the table to take the load. Otherwise you will need to provide one from the front of the press to the floor. Worked well enough for me to use my LNL-AP with a brass feeder.
     
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  10. M-14

    M-14 Member

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    All very good inspiration everyone, thank you. Too many "children" still live at home, so zero spare indoor space...

    This stand is inexpensive and appears to be the same as the Performance Tool painted a different color. That and a chunk of 3/4 ply that I can stain and poly come to less than $50. If I get the Lee press mount, I can remove the press and fold the table up if needed.

    I have a stool, so when the press arrives I'm going to set it on something along with my stool and see what height my target will be.

    I was a bit hesitant to ask, but I'm sincerely glad I did. I was just about to spend way more than I want on the Frankfort bench. Then again, the dump is open today, maybe I should go browse the metal pile. I picked up a nearly brand new chainsaw last week that needed only a spark plug!
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2020
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  11. M-14

    M-14 Member

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    That was one of my first thoughts, was make a platform to bolt the press on, then clamp to a table with my quick clamps. (she didn't think that was a good idea) lol
     
  12. M-14

    M-14 Member

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    Hows that stand working out?
     
  13. Bwana John

    Bwana John Member

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    Presses, powder measures, trimmers, etc... mounted on 2x8s and secured with big "C" clamps.
     
  14. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    In college I reloaded with a press mounted on a board that I clamped to the kitchen table when needed. Nothing else needs to be secured or bolted down. It all fit nicely into a small cardboard box that stored in the top of the closet.

    I agree with your assessment to keep it all indoors. A lot of available equipment will rust if left in the garage or other uncontrolled temp / humidity area.
     
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  15. GT1

    GT1 Member

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  16. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    Make the board as long as the table where you want to setup at, min 1.5" thick, so you can recess the T-nuts. This way the board will be smooth with nothing underneath to scratch. I put some felt on the bottom of the board so it would not scratch the table. It must be over the leg or the table will break down. Like I said it was stable enough to run AP with a brass feeder.
     
  17. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    A black and decker workmate off Craigslist will cost $25-35 and work.

    A board and a c clamp or two will as well.

    9B4DD2F6-2474-4D1F-B2CF-CEA741E89822.jpeg FCF0C86D-89D1-4D30-A2E4-EF533049FFE7.jpeg

    I have even made a couple mounts that plug into a 2” receiver.

    C0385354-F0CE-4247-8448-57DC7416CB06.jpeg
     
  18. Waterboy3313

    Waterboy3313 Member

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    I have my spot setup in the garage. I'm sure if I was caught doing anything gun related in my house my wife would have a come apart. The garage is insulated gets down to any 50* in the winter time and maybe 100ish in the summer time. I spent maybe $100 on a dedicated bench 8 feet long and 30 inches wide. My equipment stays good and rust free. I also mounted a cheap MTM gun vise on one end for general cleaning and maintenance stuff. I used some leftover white paint for the top and back area. Really helps to see any small parts accidentally dropped. My only limitations is the temperature. I also generally like the garage door open to get fresh air in and a little more light.

    Reloading can be messy if you are are married and want to keep it that way I suggest not doing it in the house. If you are are worried about leaving things out the garage for whatever reason make a quick mount that can be clamped to your garage bench and stored in the house. Trimming cases and spilled powder will not impress the wife or girlfriend. It will probably scare her and she won't want to vacuum anymore.
     
  19. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    If you're going to the junkyard if they have a scrap metal section you might be able to find yourself a half inch plate that's big enough to Mount Your press on and then use some continuous hinge mounted to a couple of studs and then you could just have a fold-down table that is quite sturdy with two legs going down to the floor that can be removed and then just let it hang against the wall when not in use
     
  20. RussellC

    RussellC Member

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    I have one of those. Surprisingly sturdy once assembled with brick in place. Shop around, I got mine for about 100.00 a couple years ago when most wanted 120.
    Once I have my permanent table, it will be repurposed with a single stage Lee press for primer removal setup.

    Russellc
     
  21. mdi

    mdi Member

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    Works great. I could remove the top (with the press and vise) and fold up the Work Mate. I'd stand t[he top with press in a corner and cover it with a pillow case, out of the way and stayed clean. The top is a scrap of 3/4" counter top (heavy) and the press is an old C-H cast iron and heavy. Sometimes I'd place some weight on the top to add stability, but most often sat in front of the press with my feet on the cross bars. It wasn't perfect, but was plenty stable for all my reloading. Sometimes I brought it in the house (AC or heat) and reloaded beside the dinning room table. I worked quite well until we moved to Oregon and I bought a 10x12 Tuff Shed. The main requirement is a stable platform to use a press. If the stand wobbles and/or moves around when using the press, it can lead to OOPS! and poor, inconsistent reloading.

    I have the HF table I use for a drill pres stand and for my use it seemed a bit too wobbly for F/L sizing some calibers. YRMV...
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2020
  22. 12Bravo20

    12Bravo20 Member

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    I made a board that I could attach my MEC reloader and my Lee Turret press to that I could then c clamp to a table when I lived in a small apartment. It worked pretty good. I made it so it was at the corner of the table so one side was for shot shell reloading and the other side for pistol/rifle reloading.
     
  23. Legionnaire
    • Contributing Member

    Legionnaire Member

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    This is what I use when it gets too hot in the garage. The Inline Fabrication QR base plate lets me change between a single stage and turret press, as well as a vise I use to hold a Wilson case trimmer.
     
  24. JKP

    JKP Member

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    My press is mounted to a piece of 1x6 oak about 12" long with a 8" 2x2 glued and screwed to the bottom. I clamp it in my workbench vise and keep it in my reloading cabinet when not used. Good reason to keep my workbench clean. It's worked well for the last 25 years
     
  25. MI2600

    MI2600 Member

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    Sorry. I couldn't resist this pic from the site GT1 cited. Now that is a working man's dream! Six or so feet of top...with no where to work.


    7616002f178cbc0a8c02d523353237c7.jpg
     
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