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What would be your general recommendation for CCW?

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by Skribs, Nov 27, 2012.

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  1. Plan2Live

    Plan2Live Member

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    Because the title on this thread would tend to attract new shooters or people new to Concealed Carry, I thought a quick re-cap was in order. Based on my review of the above posts, here is how it breaks down so far…

    25 Generic Suggestion or No Suggestion

    23 Glock

    14 Revolver

    5 Other Specific Brand

    8 N/A – mostly squabbling replies to posts

    Let’s face it, a Glock doesn’t do anything significantly differently than a M&P, XD, XDm, H&K, Taurus, Kahr or other compact or subcompact semi-auto striker fired pistol. Pointing to Glock’s widespread use among law enforcement agencies as proof of their superiority is like claiming that a Ford Crown Victoria is the best car on the road or the best car for a new driver because of it’s widespread use among law enforcement agencies.

    The fact remains that not all shooters have the same likes, dislikes, needs or hot buttons. There are numerous manufacturers making very reliable, very accurate products. As a result, there is no across the board answer as the best handgun for any purpose. Giving a one size fits all answer is simply arrogant, irresponsible and overtly biased.

    Buying a gun, holster, belt, accessories and ammunition is a very large investment for most people. New shooters or new carriers should try as many options as possible before making a purchase.
     
  2. Sock Puppet

    Sock Puppet Member

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    Well said.
     
  3. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    The advantage that a Glock DOES have over some of the newer ones, is that is is much more widely used and much more standardized. You are much more likely to find them used than the others, and because there are so many, they are usually cheaper. Also for things like holsters, magazines, etc.

    I won't say that a Glock always has a quality advantage over the newer polymer framed guns, or that you can't find a deal on the others. (I just got my wife a like-new XD-9 for $300.) But they are in wider use, they have been around longer, and they are more standardized.
     
  4. larryh1108

    larryh1108 Member

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    If I was in charge of marketing for a new gun shop and was trying to reach the CCW market, I'd have a picture of a Kahr PM9, Ruger LCP, a Sig .380, a J frame snubbie and a Boberg. Of course there are as many guns as there are companies that make them that work but this is what pops into my mind when advertising for a CCW. Small yet discreet and easy to carry.

    It amazes me at how many people just can't get the concept of just throwing thoughts out there without all of the posturing, finger pointing and other deep insight you wish to share. Some times you can just toss out a thought or idea just for the sake of a good discussion. That never seems to happen here for whatever reason. Anyone who posts knows skribs is not a newbie and he asked a simple question for which a simple answer could be given but, of course, that just can't happen here. It's amazing.
     
  5. JohnBiltz

    JohnBiltz Member

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    I don't know what people think a "recommendation" means. Its something to look at, maybe try. It doesn't mean if the grip is too large to hold buy it anyway. Concealed carry is a very personal thing. Its also something very different to live with than to imagine and surprisingly different from individual to individual. Even Glock guys will argue about whether its better to carry a G26 or the larger G19. Then you can make a very informed decision based on logic, research and testing and discover you just hate carrying it. You really can't pick a carry for someone. But recommend one, sure why not?

    I've been asked a few times and my answer is always the same, "I carry a G26". That is not being a fan boy. Its the only gun I've ever carried, how could I answer anything else? I suspect there is little difference between carrying a Glock, M&P or the Rugers because they are all pretty similar in size and all are well made handguns from quality manufacturers. All follow my carry philosophy of having a handgun with at least ten rounds of major caliber rounds in the magazine and being reliable.
     
  6. Inebriated

    Inebriated Member

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    Glock 26.
     
  7. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    Ruger SP-101

    Easy to handle, easy to learn, .357 will do most jobs we need to worry about in a SD scenario, and affordable to buy, and practice with. The grip usually fits most hands at least good enough to shoot acurately.

    A "catch all" is a bad idea though, as others have stated. A spingfield XDs is actually a better option IMO, but not easy to shoot for a beginer.
     
  8. capcyclone

    capcyclone Member

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    Glock 26

    *Compact
    *Reliable
    *Widely used
     
  9. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

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    Being as 'generic' as I can be:

    One they can afford to practice with a LOT. That would steer me towards 9mm or .38 Special in caliber.

    One they will actually carry. A lot of folks compete with a full sized gun but actually carry a j-frame. You don't see too many competitions for 5 shot snubbies. Snubies are not a great choice for a beginner, they can be downright unpleasant to shoot. The 3 inch SP 101 is a good choice in a small frame as it has enough mass to tame recoil. Not many people like the stock grips.

    A reputable manufacturer. I would never point someone to less than reliable handgun.

    One that can be customized to FIT the shooter. While this is a relatively 'new' option in auto loaders having various backstraps and grips can really help a new shooter right out of the box. Pick one with a wide selection of grips, sights and gunleather available. Everyone has a box full of holsters they've tried and tossed.

    I know Glock makes a good pistol I just haven't found one that fits my hand. While I am a fan of the BHP and 1911 I'm not sure I'd send a 'new' shooter in either direction.

    The new 'crop' of single stack 9mm pistols is what I suspect I'd steer someone to at least TRY out. They are affordable (Kahr and Ruger with poly frames are certainly available on a budget) and controllable.

    I like the 3-4 inch 357 as a starter as well. A shooter can 'train up' to 357 while getting in a lot of practice with 38's. The big downsize to revolvers is carrying a fast reload (speedloader) is bulky. Fast reloading is trickier with a revolver. The smaller the revolver, the trickier it is.
     
  10. Alnamvet68

    Alnamvet68 Member

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    The one handgun that is always in my pocket, or on my hip is a S&W J frame...either the 442 or my most recent acquisition, the Model 42 Classic. That said, any handgun weighing less then a pound and can shoot atleast a 38 Special round is, in my humble opinion, the best option for CCW.
     
  11. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    A gun you like, can shoot well, carries with extreme comfort and conceals well so you'll have it on you as long as you're dressed during the day.

    That's it.

    For me, most of the time, though I have other options, it's a Kel Tec P11.
     
  12. Charlie1022

    Charlie1022 Member

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    As an instructor I would recommend the proper training first and learn the knowledge, skills and attitude first. With proper training they can then make an edudicated decision on the best hand gun for them.
     
  13. allin

    allin Member

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    J frame 3" stainless 5 shot 38 special. goes bang every time, accurate, proven round, easy CCW.
     
  14. Hit_Factor

    Hit_Factor Member

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    9mm semiautomatic, small, a Glock 26 or Kahr PM9 are good exampled.

    I have found that depending on weather, attire, planned activity, that I have 7 or so different guns that I carry regularly.

    Glock 26 or 19
    3" 1911 9mm
    4" 1911 45
    5" 1911 45
    2" J-frame .357
    3" L-frame plus .357
    Diamondback 380
     
  15. TFIT

    TFIT Member

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    Glock 19 Gen4. Of course, like you said, depending on the shooter, but for the general answer I'd start with the 19. Best pistol you can buy for the money. Key there...for the money. The G26 subcombact is also a nice choice to look at. I carry the G17 Gen4, but have carried the 19 and love it. Also have a look at the S&W M&P models. They have a VERY nice selection of pistols and a lot of LE agencies are starting to go with these weapons over Glock. I have one myself, the M&P 45. They have a good selection, so I definitely recommend having a look at them.

    There are a lot of selections out there, but I've heard most professionals recommend to stay with proven brands like S&W, Sig, Glock, HK, etc. I've worked with a lot including the aforementioned as well as Steyr, Springfield, Keltec, Ruger, etc., but at the end of the day, peace of mind is most important when carrying a pistol. What I like most about the Glock and M&P is they are striker fired pistols with constant trigger pulls which means you don't have to get used to a long trigger pull then convert to the short pull (DA/SA system) like double action/single action pistols offer. Some folks like that, but I really don't. With the striker fired system, you can just pull and shoot immediately without having to contend with the DA/SA system or fool with an external safety. Also they are a couple hundred less than other great pistols like Sig & HK. Try a few, pick what you like best and go with it.

    As far as caliber goes, I recommend getting a 9MM. I use Hornady Critical Duty. Check it out. However, one friend recommended getting the biggest caliber you can conceal and control meaning what you can get the most hits with. Shot placement is the most critical issue when it comes to shooting and defense. Also, practice...A LOT!!! Work on precision shooting and site shooting (pointing and shooting with both eyes open without taking the time to "aim"). You can rest assured if you're faced with a real threat you won't have time to draw down and aim carefully. The more comfortable you are with the point/shoot procedure the better off you are. I will also add this. A lot of agencies are going to 9MM or .45 and getting away from the .40. Why? They have found their officers score better hits with those calibers than with the .40. Just what I'm told. :)

    Glock and M&P...great weapons for the money. That's where I'd start! Good luck!!!
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
  16. orionengnr

    orionengnr Member

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    General recommendations:

    The best advice I ever received regarding CHL-type handguns was:

    Of course, that assumes:

    --that the shooter has received adequate safety and operational instruction.
    --that the shooter is capable of and committed to actually carrying.
    --that the shooter has already shot everything (s)/he can lay his hands on.

    Of course, I received that advice quite belatedly, so had to fumble and find my way through the wilderness. :)
     
  17. larryh1108

    larryh1108 Member

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    Obviously you don't know a thing about firearms and bullet calibers.
     
  18. doc2rn

    doc2rn Member

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    Gonna go with a Ruger MK II or III or Browning Buckmark. Gotta learn the basics and both of these are fine choices for a first sidearm.
     
  19. Ford

    Ford Member

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    Kahr PM9
     
  20. BLB68

    BLB68 Member

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    It depends on the shooter. They should get what fits their hand.

    There is no catch-all answer, just a set of criteria. You gave two of those. Two more are reliability and acceptable accuracy. Many, many guns on the market fit the bill. Then it gets down to individual preferences, including recoil sensitivity, size limitations, any physical issues, etc. Also, fit can't be stressed enough for newer shooters, IMO.
     
  21. ZeSpectre

    ZeSpectre Member

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    My recommendation would be for that person to go out and locate a certified safety instructor and get some lessons and some mentoring on firearms from someone with some real experience before they even begin to attempt the selection process.
     
  22. BLB68

    BLB68 Member

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    How well did those guys shoot at the Empire State building shooting? Having been in the military, I know exactly how well they make the M9 work, which isn't very well at all, unless you have large hands. As someone else stated, the military's pistol training isn't very good at all. I was an MP, carried a pistol all day, every day, and we received pathetic training on pistol marksmanship.

    For a new shooter, hand to gun fit is important. Doubly so, since in the heat of the moment, whatever training they've had is likely to dissolve. Good fit means that the gun will point more naturally, and in many cases, that's exactly what's going to happen: untrained point shooting.

    While true, that doesn't mean you throw out basics like gun fit. Most folks don't have a lot of money to waste, so it's important to get them something that's at least mostly right the first time out.

    Three things to look for, but the rest aren't "just options."
     
  23. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

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    My greatest of generalizations which cover all of our CCW pieces:

    Stainless
    Thin
    Safe to handle in a potentially fumbling scenario
    Grippy
    .32 or greater
    Limited snag points
    Built to withstand regular familiarization shooting (unlike say, Ravens, Lorcins and the like)
     
  24. giggitygiggity

    giggitygiggity Member

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    I have two that are excellent for concealed carry: 1. Ruger LCP and 2. S&W 360PD in .38/.357. They're light, slim, reliable, and accurate.
     
  25. Wilbert

    Wilbert Member

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    Glock, S&W, Ruger, Colt, FNH, Browning, Sig Sauer, Kimber, Springfield, Taurus, Remington, Steyr, CZ, Beretta, Stoeger, Magnum Research...

    Dang, I know I didn't catch them all! Somebody help me :p
     
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