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What would you like to see in a new revolver design?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Colt451985, Mar 19, 2013.

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  1. Colt451985

    Colt451985 Member

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    Ruger was certainly inspired by the AR-15 and other similar firearm designs, which incorporate an upper and lower receiver. I too was thinking of something similar to the Ruger LCR and your suggestion. I'm gravitating towards this direction for my own design.

    I disagree, however, that a polymer frame is necessary. Reducing the weight for a pocket revolver like the LCR makes sense, but revolvers are frequently chambered in hard recoiling cartridges such as the .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum, .454 Casull, and so on. Polymer frames are popular for semiautomatic pistols, but the recoil characteristics for the 9mm Luger, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP allow for lighter weight without being unpleasant or painful to shoot. The 10mm Auto is about the most powerful semiautomatic pistol cartridge available (that's practical in a recoil operated semiautomatic) and you'll notice that many people prefer to fire it in all-steel 1911s to reduce recoil. Furthermore, it appears that Smith & Wesson has not been very successful selling aluminum or scandium framed revolvers larger than the J-Frame. This could be for several reasons, but I suspect there aren't a lot of people who enjoy shooting a .44 Magnum or similar hard recoiling cartridge from a revolver that weighs less than 30 ounces.

    A couple ideas that come to mind:

    The lower receiver is the serialized "firearm" as far as the ATF is concerned. That gives the owner of the revolver the option of purchasing multiple monolithic upper receivers with different barrel lengths, handling characteristics, and sights. The sights stay with the barrel, so the owner does not need to sight-in or zero the revolver each time the barrel is changed. The word "monolithic" refers to the absence of a joint between the barrel and frame, or in this case, the upper receiver.

    To install the barrel liner into the monolithic upper receiver can be done several ways. One way would be to incorporate a barrel nut similar to the Dan Wesson design. This would allow the owner of the revolver to adjust the barrel to cylinder gap to his or her preference by removing the barrel nut and tightening or loosening the barrel liner, which would move the forcing cone closer or further away from the cylinder. This would also allow the owner to replace the barrel liner.

    Any barrel blank from well known barrel makers, such as Shilen, can be easily turned on a lathe into a barrel liner of the design I have in mind. Basically, the barrel liner is the same outside diameter as the inside diameter of the monolithic upper receiver. The monolithic upper receiver is tapped at the muzzle and the barrel liner is likewise threaded at the muzzle. The muzzle of the monolithic upper receiver is recessed and the barrel liner extends past the recess. A barrel nut is then threaded to the muzzle of the barrel liner and tightened to lock the barrel liner to the monolithic upper receiver. In other words, a gunsmith would buy any pistol barrel blank, turn the muzzle of the barrel liner to the outside diameter of the threads, thread the muzzle, turn the rest of the barrel liner to the inside diameter of the monolithic upper receiver, crown the muzzle of the barrel liner, and chamfer the forcing cone of the barrel liner.

    While the barrel nut is tightened or loosened with a spanner wrench, the barrel liner is tightened or loosened into the monolithic upper receiver with a tool that engages the rifling. Both the spanner wrench for the barrel nut and the tool that engages the rifling would be supplied to the owner of the revolver.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  2. guitarguy314

    guitarguy314 Member

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    So so many guns I'd like. A modern day LeMat, more dan wesson type kits, Wildey and AMP auto mags...so many cool guns could be had.
     
  3. Colt451985

    Colt451985 Member

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    One flaw I see in your idea is that, unlike a magazine for a semiautomatic pistol, a revolver cylinder does more than hold the cartridges. Whereas a magazine can be stamped from inexpensive sheet metal or molded from polymer, a revolver cylinder must be machined from expensive alloy and heat treated to withstand the pressure of a revolver cartridge. While your idea is interesting, I don't think there is much of a market for people who want to treat a cylinder that costs $100 or more like they would a $20 magazine. A cylinder also weighs quite a bit more than a magazine and carrying multiple cylinders would become cumbersome.
     
  4. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    Chamelot Delvigne. French 1873 ordnance revolver, but made of modern steel and chambered for .45ACP and with a good DA trigger.

    Revolver triggers are bad?
    Have you ever shot a factory Glock? That is a wonky trigger.

    Anyhoo, I'd want the Python brought back.

    I really like the idea of the DW style revolver with interchangeable barrels and cylinders in different calibers.
    One of the great things about the DW was that the barrel was under tension when installed.
    A modern day LeMat with a break top frame would be sweet.

    Of course, I wish someone (Ruger) would make a new copy of the Broomhandle Mauser chambered for .22 mag.
    But, that's not a revolver.

    A .45 ACP revolver with a frame window sized for it would be sweet, especially in a Charter Bulldog size.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013
  5. JFrame

    JFrame Member

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    I see a lot of votes for break-tops here...

    I'll add myself to that tally -- one each in .45 ACP and 9mm, please... :)


    .
     
  6. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    Break tops are cool like double barrel shotguns.
     
  7. Colt451985

    Colt451985 Member

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    Reducing that dimension would put the barrel to cylinder gap perilously close to your trigger finger and, if using a two hand grip, the support hand. When firing a revolver, the hot expanding gases exiting from the barrel to cylinder gap could burn you if your skin is too close.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013
  8. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    It could, but my hands aren't big enough for it to be a problem. Plus, it's a low pressure round. Less blowtorch effect.
    Now, in .40 S&W or 9mm, I could definitely see a problem.
    Plus, the S&W .45 ACP revolvers had a short cylinder with the barrel extending further into the frame window, putting the BC gap in the same place it would be with a shorter frame window.
    I think the real reason they did that was the expense of building an entirely different frame, just for one caliber.
    Now, it is true that the N frame cylinder is larger diameter than a Charter cyl and puts the BC gap higher, thus a little further from your hand.
    I'd be good with a 6 shot .45 revolver with a shorter frame window.

    Besides, I can dream, can't I?;)
     
  9. Scipio Africanus

    Scipio Africanus Member

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    I would like an S&W N Frame capable of handling .454 Casull. Love my X frame, but it is too big to carry all the time. Four in barrel and six shot capacity a must. An X frame in .475 (Maximum)? A Scandium X frame with maybe a seven shot .44 mag cylinder, or even eight. I don't know if that is possible dimensionally. A 325 in .45 Colt, like the popular 329. (no not the darn "Governor")
    Equipment rails made available on steel N frames, like the TR and M&P revolvers.
    The return of a medium frame .44 special from S&W.

    A double action revolver capable of handling the 45-70 and .50 Alaskan. :evil:

    A factory Ruger Super Redhawk with a 4 to 5 in barrel in .454 Casull and .475 Linebaugh.
    A factory Ruger Super Redhawk in .500 Linbaugh.
    A Super Redhawk Alaskan in .500 Linebaugh.

    Ok, none of this is radical design change, but I'm dreaming... :D
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2013
  10. silvermane_1

    silvermane_1 Member

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    medusa revolver+wesson pistol pac, nuff said
     
  11. sidheshooter

    sidheshooter Member

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    Break top, 5-shot .44 spec; side latched for one-handed reloading, with a camming trigger like the LCR's-scaled up a bit-should be possible to make it even smoother and lighter with total reliability. Modular quick change grips so one could have more hand-filling or ultimate concealment with just the flip of a lever on the backstrap. Pinned/plungered in front sights in different heights and levels of light reflection and gathering to zero loads and accommodate differing uses.

    If you really want to push the brain trust, figure out a way to seal the gap at the moment of firing and add a threaded barrel... it's been done....
     
  12. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Definitely some kind of updated top-break design, in three frame sizes that would go from small calibers (.22/.32), to medium (.38/9mm.), to large (.45/.44 Special).

    Would love to see a modern version of the Webley-Fosbery automatic revolver.
     
  13. Mp7

    Mp7 Member

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    Something to fill the gap between NAA minis and the LCR.


    an aluminium framed 4shot in 9mm would be nice. Or in 32Acp, or 22.mag?

    Slender, but a good grip.

    It would sell like mad, i bet.
     
  14. hAkron

    hAkron Member

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    This is what I was thinking too. A modern day DA revolver in the vein of a Dan Wesson where virtually any part is user replaceable.
     
  15. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I'd really love to see a new revolver and .41 magnum cartridge developed in a GP100, or S&W L frame sized revolver.

    A six shot super hot roded 41 mag would be cool as hell.

    6 shots, flat shooting and operate like the 460 magnum, where it will take 45 Schofield, Colt, 454, and 460. Co-develope with a major ammo maker. Lengthen the case. 180 gr slug at 2400 ft/sec would generate about 2300 ft lbs. Good for hunting, good for critter defense, down loaded, good for home defense, new land speed record for a handgun cartridge, all in a handy sized 6 shot revolver.
     
  16. Dain Bramage

    Dain Bramage Member

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    You could combine the concepts. Have multiple upper assemblies that remove at the break-top pivot. Probably wouldn't be much cheaper than buying new whole revolvers, though.
     
  17. jhvaughan2

    jhvaughan2 Member

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    Kind of like my Valmet shotgun. The idea is you can swap the barrels for any caliber and combination of shotgun and rifle. The problem is the barrels cost more than a new shotgun or rifle. I guess it works if you only want to have one gun.
     
  18. blueskyjaunte

    blueskyjaunte Member

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    Another vote for a modern, durable top-break design. As a lefty that loves wheelguns I am sadly most comfortable with SAA-style revolvers.
     
  19. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    I think that if you are looking for the revolver equivalent to the semi-custom 1911 makers (you mentioned Ed Brown and Wilson Combat), you'll have to do very high quality fighting guns, with some target guns thrown in the mix.

    Revolvers don't really get a lot of attention when it comes to CQB type guns because everyone is so focused on 1911s and polymer high-cap pistols.

    The most recent example of the type of guns I'm thinking we'd be discussing here is the Nightguard line from S&W. but expanded, and not all with lightweight wheelguns. Light weight makes them nice to carry, but I want a gun that shoots nicely!

    My ideal fighting wheelgun in this scenario would be something like mid frame .357, with 3"bbl, with stainless steel frame, and melonite/tennifer type finish. From the factory it would come with melt job, trigger job, recessed crown, chamfered chambers, front dovetail sights set up with XS big dot or other as buyer specifies, and make it a 7 round cylinder (like the 686+).

    I could have most of that work done to my Speed Six, but if there was a factory option...

    That, to me, is the absolute ideal fighting wheel gun.

    As for target variants, it seems like a lot of the custom shops cater to mostly the defensive practical competitions/carry/hd crowd. It's what's hot. Sure people will use a Wilson for bullseye shoots, but I'd bet (with nothing to back this up other than a gut feeling) that for every Wilson or Nighthawk used in bullseye, there are 3 or 4 being used in IPSC/IDPA or as EDC pistols.
     
  20. Yoda

    Yoda Member

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    Me, too

    Top break. If cylinder length is an issue with regards to forcing cone/support hand geometry, then move the whole cylinder forward and make the frame and grip sweep back at a more shallow angle, like an old Webley Mk IV.

    Here's an idea: Turn the underlug into a rifled .410 barrel. Even with zero barrel length, it would be good for snakes at close range... snakes that slither, and snakes that don't.

    Calibers? Please, please, please, a .30 carbine revolver!

    - - - Yoda
     
  21. Yoda

    Yoda Member

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    How about...

    Top break 9mm that will accept both 9x19 (Parabellum) and 9x17 (.380 ACP) on full moon clips.

    Alternatively, a swing-out cylinder that can handle either round would also be good. It would help address ammo availability issues, and the .380 could be a good training alternative or carry alternative for someone with weak hands.

    And with an ambidetxerous (however you spell it) release, so my daugher-in-law could/would use it, too!

    - - - Yoda
     
  22. 19-3Ben

    19-3Ben Member

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    You mean like a LeMat?
     
  23. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I would like to see a high quality K frame size .32 Long revolver. Not likely to happen, but I wish.
     
  24. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    I would also love to see a revision of the Colt New Service and Shooting Master. Something like what we'd see if USFA started reproducing them. Made of modern heat treated steel, they would easily be strong enough for the .41Mag, .44Mag and "Ruger only" .45Colt. Fixed and adjustable sights and any barrel length from 2" to 7½".
     
  25. sidheshooter

    sidheshooter Member

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    Have you seen this year's version of the Wiley Clapp GP? if you can do without the 7th shot...

    [​IMG]
     
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