what would you put in a first aid kit for your range bag?

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics, and Training' started by Gun4Fun90, May 10, 2021.

  1. tarosean

    tarosean Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2010
    Messages:
    7,335
    Location:
    TX
  2. huntsman

    huntsman Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2003
    Messages:
    4,686
    Location:
    ohio's northcoast
    Having taken both a stop the bleed class would be better for GSW than FA
     
    Ed4032 and hso like this.
  3. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2008
    Messages:
    13,463
    This has been a worthwhile and informative discussion. Thanks for the inputs. I will reflect upon them.

    We have standard kits in the house and in both cars, an when we had the motorhome, we had one there.

    I'll look over the posts here and do some assessment.

    Again, thanks for the inputs, and thanks to the OP for bringing this up.
     
  4. mstreddy

    mstreddy Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,879
    Location:
    SE Fla -- land of sunshine, liquid and otherwise.
    I'll add my thanks to all on this thread. It's been very informative.
    I also like those kits from Stocked Kits. Thanks for the link.
     
  5. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,378
    Location:
    Medina, Ohio USA
    A couple bandaids.
     
  6. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    Messages:
    8,104
    Location:
    SE GA
    I do landscaping on the side and I assembled a kit that would rival an EMS kit. Here is an item that has come in handy for me even though I have not needed it so much in what I would call a dire emergency.

    For bleeding, I have a few rolls of what I call compression gauze. It’s like a mixture between an Ace bandages and normal gauze. The rolls are pretty long too. This way I can wrap it around myself and still have a free hand.

    They are also good for snake bite treatment. Snake venom travels mostly through the lymphatic system. Say you get bit in the ankle. You wrap this around your leg from ankle to knee and it keeps pressure on the outside of your leg. This slows the speed of the venom and it works better than just a band.

    I’m not positive exactly what it is I have. I would have to look. A regular Ace bandage would be much the same though. These things I have are made to be disposable though and much less expensive.
     
  7. DoubleMag

    DoubleMag Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,265
    Range bag? LOTS of gr8t suggestions :thumbup:

    My IFAK is actually a small red soft zippered cooler. Probably big enough for 2 cans of pop, sandwich, ice pack, and the MUST HAVE M&Ms:cool:

    My torney is attached to the OUTSIDE soft handle. Rationale, VERY visible.

    IN OUTSIDE slip style slot/pouch, small 1-way valve for rescue breathing (if theres time), pen, paper

    Inside, top to bottom and in somewhat particular order...

    -ziploc with gloves, masks (if U have time, start out right)
    -Quik Clot
    -Med handi-wipes
    -tampons
    -individual tear fold pouches, betadine , poison ivy wipes
    -various bandages from larger 3'' square style down to lil booboo sized.
    -Tube of hand lotion
    -SolarCaine
    -sandwiched between some of this stuff and towards the top, medical scissors (blunted bottom lip)
    -small sealed and DATED box, MY medicines. Includes basic analgesics (aspirin ibuprof), antacids. Med tape strip to KEEP sealed is dated, I rotate 4th of July & Christmas // easy dates
    -cold pack (you flex it and it gets cold) for quick cold compress. Cheap and store brands arre available
    -med tape
    -ankle ACE bandage wrap

    HERE's ONE THAT HAS ESCAPED THE THREAD THUSFAR...
    --- bottle of eye wash / store brand. Or, saline solution.


    -small 4oz bottle of WATER
    -paper thermometers
    -tweezers, small magnifying glass
    -VERY SHARP KNIFE
    -other stuff I can't remember right now I guess hehe

    >>>>>WHAT I WILL ADD BECAUSE OF THIS THREAD...

    didn't know there was med super glue, will add
    large piece of plastic / or chest seal for chest punctures

    GR8T THREAD:thumbup::thumbup:
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2021
  8. ilbob

    ilbob Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    18,505
    Location:
    Illinois
    I think your best bet is to just bring the same kind of first aid kit you would have any place else. While there is a slight chance of being shot while on the range, it's probably no greater than being shot someplace else. Your chances of getting minor cuts and bruises and scrapes and whatnot are about the same at the range as they are anywhere else and you should have some way to deal with them that does not involve ignoring them because you don't have a first aid kit.
     
    .308 Norma likes this.
  9. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2003
    Messages:
    61,460
    Location:
    0 hrs east of TN
    Keep the general first aid separate from the gunshot wound necessities so you aren't digging through a bunch of stuff while responding to the traumatic injury. That's why my kits are individually packaged for gsw, airway, traumatic orthopedic injuries, and THEN general. You may have Benadryl with your aspirin, but be sure you have a separate melt or chew version in the airway kit for aniphylaxis from stings. But our topic here is GSWs, which are usually traumatic bleeding and airway injuries with shock.

    An ARC FA class is good, BUT it won't address GSW. If you don't take a GSW class, at least take one of the Stop The Bleed. Best if you take a disaster responder/WFR class like my Daughter and I have. We know responses to traumatic injuries my med pro spouse doesn't.
     
    waterhouse likes this.
  10. Gridley

    Gridley Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2018
    Messages:
    267
    Location:
    Washington State
    I'm a little horrified that I'm pretty sure we got to post #32 before someone mentioned gloves. :-( BSI, people. Sharing is great, but don't share diseases.

    I'll strongly second training - and note that for something like a tourniquet you probably want to buy one for training (some companies make models specifically for training) in addition to the one (or more) that you intend to put in a FAK.

    Think about what you'll need to do if there's a GSW. You'll need to:
    1. Prevent things from getting worse. Unload and prove safe all firearms. No special gear needed.
    2. Get help coming. Most people these days carry a phone, but think about what you need to say to a 911 dispatcher (and what you DON'T want to say - you don't want a SWAT team showing up instead of an ambulance).
    3. Glove up. If there was a GSW, there's gonna be blood. I suggest [EDIT: your kit should have] multiple pairs of gloves, go with nitrile not latex, and at least one pair of "large" even if your hands aren't so you can outfit an assistant ("hold this here").
    4. Get consent. "I know first aid, I'm going to help you, OK?" Can be done in parallel with #3.
    5. Assess & access. In addition to training and practicing, you'll want a set of trauma shears. Don't assume the wound you see is the only one there is; bullets both go in and come out.
    6. Treat. Given that we're talking GSW, most likely you're going to want to do bleeding control. People have already mentioned various good ideas (gauze with clotting agents, Izzy's, tourniquets, etc.). Again remember that one bullet can easily make both an entry and an exit hole, so you need more than one gauze pad/whatever. I also note that torso wounds can have extra complications; while plastic sheeting and duct tape will work, these aren't too pricey: https://www.grainger.com/product/55MW27?ef_id=EAIaIQobChMIy6Ta9vvG8AIV8DizAB2kiAxqEAQYASABEgL1Y_D_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!496359977965!!!g!471328313888!&gucid=N:N:pS:paid:GGL:CSM-2295:4P7A1P:20501231&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy6Ta9vvG8AIV8DizAB2kiAxqEAQYASABEgL1Y_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
    (NA Rescue HyFin Vent Chest Seals). Training will allow you to choose the right treatment for each wound - don't just jump straight to the tourniquet every time!!
    7. Re-asses. Once you've controlled any serious bleeding you can see, its a good idea to take a more thorough look for anything you might have missed. No new gear needed.
    8. Report. When the medics arrive you want to tell them as much useful information as possible in an organized fashion. A notebook and pen/sharpie are useful to get you ready. With practice you can get info from the patient while treating them. Being a scribe is another good "hey you" job for someone with no/minimal training who wants to help.
    9. De-glove. Practice doing this (I'm sure there's videos out there). It is quite embarrassing to put on gloves only to slime yourself when you take them off.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2021
    Leon tP and 340PD like this.
  11. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2014
    Messages:
    11,400
    Location:
    Middle Tn
    Something that is vitally important is a smooth round pokey tool of some sort. Screwdriver, ink pen, toothpick... whatever.

    I’m safety manager in real life and one of the crazy things I have stocked in my FA kits is cheapo bic ink pens. First off, people need ink pens and they learn where the FA kits are, but more importantly when you need to move fast you need to know what the heck your doing and be able to do it quick. There is no quicker and cleaner way to use roller gauze than to shove an ink pen (or other smooth round pokey thing) into the middle of the roll of gauze (think putting a hotdog on a stick to campfire roast it) and using your “dumb hand” stabilize the wounded body part, and with your strong hand you wrap the hell out of it quickly (think of the ink pen as a handle). Generally an inkpen provides decent resistance so it puts a bit of pressure to help close wounds and hold it closed. Using this technique I (and my guys who I train) regularly get compliments from medical guys about our bandages. So you wrap it with roller gauze, then use either tape or ace bandage to secure it. A lot of times I put the inkpen in between the roller gauze and the outer bandage to give it some rigidity which gets people to quit flexing the wound and popping it open to keep bleeding. Yes I have a lot of experience with doing this because in my 14 years as a safety professional I have worked in stamping, welding, tube bending, tube making, and automotive pressing/molding facilities. Everything is sharp in all of those settings.
     
    theotherwaldo likes this.
  12. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2013
    Messages:
    6,527
    Location:
    Southern CA
    Suggestions on Tourniquets?
    What flavor is preferred?
     
  13. Gridley

    Gridley Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2018
    Messages:
    267
    Location:
    Washington State
    That's the medical equivalent of "9mm or 45"? :)

    I use CATs. https://www.narescue.com/combat-application-tourniquet-c-a-t.html I say use the one you'll actually practice using and/or have been trained to use.
     
  14. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2013
    Messages:
    6,527
    Location:
    Southern CA
    Oh dear, I may have created a monster;)
    Having never used one and not having one (something I need to fix) I was after suggestions, thanks for yours.
     
  15. Gridley

    Gridley Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2018
    Messages:
    267
    Location:
    Washington State
    I will say in favor of the CATs:
    1. They're fairly easy to use, though I was originally trained on ancient versions and field expedients, so take that with a grain of salt.
    2. They *can* be used one-handed, though it isn't trivial.
    3. Most distributors sell the trainer (blue) as well as the regular ones. Pretty please don't buy any tourniquet and just stick it in your bag until you need it and have to read the instructions while someone bleeds.
    4. They come in civilian orange ("hey! Hospital Staff! Pay attention to me!") or military/tacticool black (I have both, different kits).
     
  16. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2013
    Messages:
    6,527
    Location:
    Southern CA
    I'm sure military/Tacticool black works much better
    It's tacticool so it must be better right?
    :rofl:

    Yep, the time to figure things out is not when blood is leaking out...
    I was kidnapped and shot once so I know how much blood can leak out, dipstick read a quart low when I got to an ER.....
    (hit in leg, passed between femur and femoral artery,{very lucky on that} looked like garden hose on low, only thing I could do at the time was direct pressure, which worked since I am typing this)
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2021
    theotherwaldo likes this.
  17. 340PD

    340PD Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1,838
    Well said. I think they were mentioned only in one previous post.
    1. Gloves are the number one item to put in your FAK and more than one pair I might add.
     
  18. Craig_VA
    • Contributing Member

    Craig_VA Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2007
    Messages:
    821
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Consider taking Mountain Man Medical's Emergency Trauma Response class online, both to learn what to do and for recommended gear. This is an online course that takes a few hours to complete, with 13 short video lessons and a quiz for each. The instructor is a former Navy corpsman and current EMT with desert war experience with the USMC. The course is free from Mountain Man Medical, a supplier of excellent first aid kits and components.
    https://www.mountainmanmedical.com
    https://www.mountainmanmedical.com/product/emergency-trauma-response-training-course/

    But, as soon as you can, also take a live hands-on trauma course to practice with a tourniquet, etc. I took Greg Elliftritz's Tactical First Aid and “System Collapse” Medicine course, and there are others, also. As others have pointed out, Red Cross classes are not going to deal with trauma medicine and tools like tourniquets.

    As for choice of tourniquet, the advice from those experts seems to be either CAT or SOF-T. Be aware, both of those as sold on Amazon or eBay may be counterfeits, so recommend buying from some other supplier than either of those.

    Craig
     
    Dudedog and Gridley like this.
  19. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2013
    Messages:
    6,389
    At the very least, a tourniquet and a hemostatic agent to deal with high volume bleeds are a must. The worst case scenario at a range is a gunshot wound. So tools to stop the bleeding are a must if you are looking at carrying a first aid kit in your range bag. I was trained on the CAT-7 and Quikclot powder, so that is my go to trauma controllers.

    My first aid has a few more things to it. Depending on which range. A snake bite kit and tick tweezers are more useful at the rural range I go to. As is sunscreen. Small bandaids also make it it into the kit. I have given out those far more for trigger finger bite than I have ever used a TQ or hemostatic agent.
     
  20. psyopspec

    psyopspec Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    4,711
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    My first aid kits are similarly configured. One in each vehicle, one in my everyday carry bag, and I have an extra TQ in the range bag.
     
  21. rabid wombat

    rabid wombat Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2014
    Messages:
    1,015
    Location:
    TX
    Last edited: May 14, 2021
  22. waterhouse

    waterhouse Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,563
    Location:
    Round Rock, TX
    I keep one of these

    https://www.narescue.com/law-enforcement-tems-products/eagle-ifak.html

    on my belt, along with a spare tourniquet. I’ve seen too many cases where one tourniquet didn’t stop a thigh bleed.

    I keep a larger kit in the truck, as the small one only has 2 chest seals, which is good for an accidental entry and exit but not much help for intentional acts that often involve more than 2 holes. Like hso, I like to keep the gunshot wound supplies separate form the standard first aid stuff.

    As mentioned, training is needed for any of the medical gear you plan on carrying.
     
  23. Rubone

    Rubone Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2020
    Messages:
    335
    Location:
    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
    Two hunters are out in the woods when one of them collapses. He doesn’t seem to be breathing and his eyes are glazed. The other guy whips out his phone and calls the emergency services. He gasps, “My friend is dead! What can I do?” The operator says “Calm down. I can help. First, let’s make sure he’s dead.” There is a silence, then a shot is heard. Back on the phone, the guy says “OK, now what?”
     
  24. Lo-Profile

    Lo-Profile Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2020
    Messages:
    69
    Location:
    Sparks, NV
    It all will fit inside a quart zip lock bag.
    1. Combat Application Tourniquet: either C.A.T or Sam XT, x2
    2. Six Inch Israeli Pressure Bandage: x1
    3. Combat Gauze Bandage: x1
    Has a hemostatic agent to help clotting. Quik-clot and gauze Bandage will be okay, takes up more space
    4. Surgical Tape: 3" x 10y or coband (self sticking)
    5. Nasopharyngeal Airway Tube w/ lube
    6. Chest Seal: Hyfin or Halo x2
    7. Gloves: No Black, get blue (blood doesn't show up on black) x2
    8. Sharpie: marking time on tourniquet. Try to find the mini ones if you can.
     
    mcb likes this.
  25. .308 Norma

    .308 Norma Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2016
    Messages:
    3,373
    Location:
    SE Idaho
    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice