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When did the Colt Anaconda become a $2,000+ gun?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by outerlimit, Feb 9, 2014.

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  1. outerlimit

    outerlimit Member

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    I used to be interested in owning a Colt Anaconda in either .44mag or .45LC. Was leaning more towards the .44mag around 2006. They were running around $800-$900 on the auction sites in NIB or "like new" condition. I've been interested in owning one again and now I see they are going for $2,000. :what:

    I'm not completely stupid, and I'm well aware of the current market for everything gun, but this just doesn't make any logical sense. I know Colt stopped making revolvers awhile back, but they have never really had high revolver production for a very long time now. What is this new craziness? I don't see this with a lot of other Colt stuff, just mainly revolvers.

    Even the medium end models like the King Cobra are commanding a left arm and a right leg in excellent condition. And a Magnum Carry is all of a sudden a $2400-$2900 gun instead of what I remember it being a $900 gun in pristine condition.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2014
  2. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    When the 300 dollars went from buying an onz of gold to taken 1500 of them for the same onz.

    Same thing happened to oil. It now takes about $100 for a barrel of oil and 10 years or so back it only took about 30 of them.

    This is what happens when you flood the market with currency.

    I feel the same way. I was looking at a nice revolver yesterday for $1750 and I was thinking "wow, a few years back this would have been $350. The collectors have really drove up the prices." Then I remembered quantitative easing and the Fed which is why things costs what they do.
     
  3. outerlimit

    outerlimit Member

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    I wonder how much worse it would be if people could actually afford things. They'd probably be hovering just over $5k right now. But I still just mainly see it in Colt with revolvers... lot of new production Colt like AR's seem to be hovering around semi-normal prices as of the last six months. Though I have noticed new production 1911's have gone up, and the older production 1911's are getting up there with the revolvers.
     
  4. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    If the economy had any hope of recovery (I know poor choice of words in the use of Hope) I think the prices would go through the roof quickly.

    I am trying to buy up as many collectible type guns I can while I can. I figure one of these days the prices will really kick up. For example, a nice S&W Pre-27 is now breaking $2000 when only a few years back they were $1200 and a couple of years before that I was buying them for $700.
     
  5. outerlimit

    outerlimit Member

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    I think things are ripe for the bottom to drop out. The people who actually care about having a few guns around have them and at least a small stockpile of ammo. I don't think it's wise to invest in collectables right now in this current market, but I could be very wrong. I just don't see these prices holding.
     
  6. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    I see it the opposite. The prices are holding because few can afford them. Once folks get more comfortable with their finances, I expect there will be a demand for nice guns like your anacoda. What I see will be come near worthless (in terms of resale) will be AR's in about 2 months. Once tax time comes around and folks realize the impact of the taxes, I think a lot of AR's will head to the pawn shops.

    Anyway, good luck on the search for a cheap Anaconda. I know I was tickled to pick up another diamondback last year but I don't plan on any more Colts in the near future.
     
  7. armedwalleye

    armedwalleye Member

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    I think Anacondas went price crazy shortly after Pythons started approaching the $3k mark. Saw one for 3k and one for $2700 in MN recently.
     
  8. wproct

    wproct Member

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    Recent pricing of the Anaconda revolvers just leave me shaking my head. Although I have never owned a Python, I have admired them all of my life as one of the most handsome, best finished, and most precision of all double action revolvers available. I can sort of understand the current values of the Pythons because they can never be put back into production and duplicated at sufficiently lower prices that would support the effort. The Anaconda on the other hand could be. I just don't get it, but time and the market will ultimately determine the value.
     
  9. JRWhit

    JRWhit Member

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    Even before the panic came to be, I remember several Anacondas commanding 15-1600$.

    I was shocked over the Colt magnum carry revolvers. Now commanding 2000-3000$.

    My thoughts are if you can find a Dan Wesson at a reasonable price, buy it.
    I think they are gonna do the same thing.
     
  10. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    I don't think it has much to do with the economy or the panic. It's a Colt and it's no longer made. People have been over-pricing Colt's for years.


    Colt stopped making double action revolvers. Single action revolvers never went away and they even reintroduced the New Frontier.
     
  11. BenFoo

    BenFoo Member

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    Here I thought the Colt revolvers got popular and gaining in value soon after The Walking Dead started. =]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    I have passed up on at least two Anacondas priced at $1200 in the past year.
     
  13. SharpsDressedMan

    SharpsDressedMan member

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    Probably about 10 years ago. Quit making something that there were never too many of to begin with, and voila!, you have a collectible.
     
  14. Vodoun da Vinci

    Vodoun da Vinci Member

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    My opinion is that it is a combination of things....first of all they are rare and excellent which means if you want one you have to pay the price or do without. The other issue is that Colt DA revolvers are valuable and money ...not as much as it used to be.

    I love Pythons and Anacondas but I can buy a Dan Wesson model that I feel shoots as well if not better for a fraction of the price. But now we are talking functionality VS collectible and that's apples and oranges.

    VooDoo
     
  15. Ohen Cepel

    Ohen Cepel Member

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    Since Colt makes almost nothing these days and I think they will go away entirely unless they change quickly their stuff has gotten $$$.

    Even now, if they wanted to make Pythons, Anacondas, or other nice revolvers they couldn't without them costing a LOT more than the last batch. Also, I doubt that they could actually make those guns now if they had to.
     
  16. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    Way back when I was in high school, and took Econ 101, I learned the answer to "why" for questions like this.

    Supply is fixed...they ain't making them any more.

    Demand is growing...every day.

    The price goes UP. Happens with any kind of widget.
     
  17. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    The Solution?
    Don't pay it.
    The sellers will have to come down in price.
     
  18. Blueduck

    Blueduck Member

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    What your seeing is the result of a couple of generations of people who grew up dreaming of fine Smith and Wesson and Colt revolvers reaching their absolute peak expendable income years. Men sacrifice and put their kids through school, pay off the mortgage, then inevitably start buying the cool things they always wanted when they were young ,whatever the price.

    In 20-25 years many of these folks will start selling off those collections to pay for final expenses, or leave them to a smaller generation with far fewer people ever interested in revolvers to begin with. So likely prices will fall or at the very least stabilize, but likely not for some time.
     
  19. OCM

    OCM Member

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    Colt made a hand fitted line of revolvers, unsurpassed in quality. The crafstmen who would spend hours fitting each part to perfection are gone. They won't be back. Now, CNC machines take their place. If you want a "Production" gun there are thousands to choose from, however if you want a precision instrument that represents the pinical of craftsmanship, "you pays your money, you gets your product".
    I could buy a '65 Mustang,289 convertable for $2500.00 in 1966, but can't now. Ford and Colt don't make 'em no 'mo.
     
  20. huntsman

    huntsman Member

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    Don't like the price of a Colt buy Ruger but when a Super Redhawk hit 2k we'll know TSHTF ;)
     
  21. wproct

    wproct Member

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    It is apparent in my earlier posting that I sometimes struggle differentiating between an extremely well designed and precision crafted product and a collectable. They can be but don't necessarily have to be the same thing.
     
  22. 788Ham

    788Ham Member

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    Another example, not to highjack your thread : I just bought a pristine S&W #14 yesterday, 6" 98%, "not made anymore". Tue. , I am buying a S&W #17, like NIB, except no box. Now, I knew when I made an offer and it was accepted, this was waaaay more than when they were first made and on the shelf back then. I've wanted one of each of these models since I can remember, they came to pass in front of me, do I pay up, or shut up? My wife said she'd get the monies together for the Tue. purchase, its in the account now, best not wait, they'll be gone. Someone out there will find the one you're after, don't hesitate to pull the trigger when it shows up.
     
  23. il.bill

    il.bill Member

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    That is an interesting point. The Babyboomers are at it again!

    My answer to the thread's question is: "Right about the time when I became interested in owning one."
     
  24. kilibreaux

    kilibreaux member

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    It became a $2,000 gun when Colt quit making it.

    Actually, Colt has a pretty good track record when you think about it.

    The 1873 "Colt" and its clones are selling like hotcakes.

    The 1911 "Colt" and its clones are selling like hotcakes.

    The AR-15 and its clones are selling like hotcakes.
     
  25. Cocked & Locked
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    Cocked & Locked Member

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    This Anaconda thread needs a picture.

    404187074.jpg
     
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