When do you stop reloading?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by rperyam, Oct 28, 2021.

  1. Seedy Character

    Seedy Character Member

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    A typical Dr visit will ask gou 3 times if you have any depression, suicidal thoughts, anger and do you own firearms.
     
  2. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    All my Dr's are gun guys. I'm never asked those questions. He ask me what I'm working on, for he knows I build guns.
     
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  3. GravelRider

    GravelRider Member

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    Take a chance at what? Your doc knowing you reload? We've got way better things to do than compile a list of patients who reload.

    I love talking guns/hunting/reloading with my patients. I'm not openly pro-2A at work with my patients, unless they bring it up first, they're wearing a gun t-shirt, etc.
     
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  4. hk940

    hk940 Member

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    What I am saying is I don't know him that well yet, There was no doubt my DR. in WV was a "Gun Guy". The give away was the pallet of 5.56 in the back room!
     
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  5. AzShooter1

    AzShooter1 Member

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    I was reloading over 70K rounds a year on my Dillon 650 with all the bells and whistles. I really enjoyed spending time with that press.

    About 3 years ago it looked like I would have to go into assisted living housing and they did not allow guns so I sold all of mine and my reloading press. A good friend came over and bought the press, all my other caliber changes and 40K primers.

    Every time I saw another piece he kept rolling off another stack of hundreds. He made my day.

    I didn't end up in the home but decided not to by my guns again or my press and started buying .22s and a bunch of ammo. I miss the time on the press but now my "reload" is getting my .22s on line. I have about 50K so I've got about a year's worth. Hope somebody gets defeated so I can afford to buy more ammo.
     
  6. unwashed

    unwashed Member

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    That's the reason I keep my gun activities to myself at the Dr., they always have you fill out paperwork on depression but I guess it depends on what State you live in, if you're in a commie State looking for any reason to take your guns away it's prudent to lie.
     
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  7. AK Hunter

    AK Hunter Member

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    I have noticed that sizing twice does make my rifle ammo more accurate. But I can't explain why. I size the first time then turn 180° & size again.
    I do notice that the more times the brass passes through the sizing die it gets a little less resistance each time.
     
  8. hk940

    hk940 Member

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    I think Barr was talking about his cast bullets not the brass.
     
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  9. Barr

    Barr Member

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    Correct, the mold release buildup was causing a slight "oval-ing" of the bullet by 0.001-0.002" out of round. Far from mission critical but could make chambering a round tighter than necessary.

    There was an interesting article in Handloader this month about sizing brass more accurately by preventing the neck from going off axis of the brass body.
    1. Remove the expanding ball in the die.
    2. Full length size the brass.
    3. Re-install the expander ball in the die.
    4. Push the case into the die only far enough to ride over the ball.

    This effectively makes it a 2-stage sizing op, I have not tried this yet but claimed less neck runout when inspected with a case gage.
     
  10. GW Staar

    GW Staar Member

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    Is the article only referring to rifle bottle neck?

    I've found I experience better case concentricity in .223 and .308 by removing the expander ball also. But I don't re-install it. Instead, I use an "M" expander included in my RCBS Tube Rifle Bullet Feed Die Sets, in station 2 of my progressive. Works really well. I would expect a Rifle M Expander from Lyman would do as well.

    The added perk is you have a 1/16" pocket your bullets drop in which keeps them nice and vertical around the progressive merry-go-round, so when you seat the bullet it is always vertical and you can keep your fingers out of there.;)

    No this doesn't have one thing to do with when I quit reloading.....but it sure makes reloading rifle while I can more pleasant.....:)
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2021
  11. 375supermag

    375supermag Member

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    Hi...
    When do I stop reloading???
    Apparently never...

    Up until a few years ago, I was basically only reloading over the winter do that I would have sufficient rounds to get me through the soring and summer shooting season.

    The last 5-6 years at least, I have been reloading just about every week just to keep up with what my son and I shoot.
    I typically load in batches of 250-500 rounds of .41Mag, .44Spl, .44Mag and .45Colt on my RockChucker. My son loads batches of 500 rounds each about every week or so of 9mm, 10mm, .357Mag and .45ACP on my Hornady progressives, depending on which ammo cans needs filling.

    I load .38Spl and .45AutoRim whenever the ammo cans gets empty. My son and I take turns loading full power jacketed bullet loads for all the revolver loads as needed, typically about 100-250 rounds per batch depending on caliber. My son pretty much loads all the .357Maximum and .375SuperMag rounds that we shoot, usually about 100-200 rounds per session. He also loads all of the .223 on my Hornady progressives, usually in batches of 500. He also loads all of our rifle cartridges as needed, usually no more than 100 rounds or so at a time.

    Only thing stopping us from loading more is conserving primers.
     
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