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When shooting a peep sight . . .

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by dmftoy1, Dec 3, 2006.

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  1. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Member

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    Do you completely ignore the peep and just focus on the front post and it's placement relative to the target or do you try to "center" the front post consciously within the peep and then hold the front post appropriately? When I'm playing with my AR I find that my groups are nowhere near as good as I can do with a buckhorn sight on my 45/70 and I suspect it's user error. I know the rifle will shoot as I can put a scope on it and the groups look good.

    Just curious about the proper "peep" technique. :) (I grew up shooting buckhorn's so I'm guessing it's just technique)

    Have a good one,
    Dave
     
  2. MaterDei

    MaterDei Member

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    The front sight doesn't necessarily have to be centered within the peep BUT for accuracy it must be consistantly at the same place relative to the peep. Centered is a good rule of thumb.
     
  3. GRB

    GRB member

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    Centering the front sight in the rear is the most practical way to do it. It should be centered because this makes it easier to remember the correct sight picture. Of course, once it is centered correctly, you let the rear sight blur and focus on the front.

    All th e best,
    Glenn B
     
  4. bhk

    bhk Member

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    I have been shooting peeps for 40 years, both for target and hunting purposes. You should find them far more accurate than notch type sights. Prone competititve shooters with peeps shoot scores that compare favorably with those using scopes.

    Your eye should automatically center the front post in the peep. No conscious effort should be needed. If you are consciously attempting to center, my guess is you are more likely to mess up.
     
  5. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    I agree with bhk, no conscious effort should be needed, your eye should automatically center the front post. You just look through the rear (paying it no mind) at the front and shoot.
     
  6. daniel (australia)

    daniel (australia) Member

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    I've used peep sights a fair bit, in military service, target shooting and hunting over the past roughly 30 years, and I still have several rifles with peep sights even now.

    My advice is to put the rear sight out of your mind. Simply look through it, and otherwise ignore it. Focus on the tip of the foresight (assuming you're using a blade) and trust your eye subconsciously to centre it. Your eye and brain will do this without any conscious effort.
     
  7. BozemanMT

    BozemanMT Member

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    Front sight, Front sight, Front sight.

    Ignore the rear sight, it will naturally center.
    This is part of why you want to be up so close so your eye naturally is way up on it and it can't help but look through it.

    Also why peep sights are so fast to acquire targets. (M1, M1A, AR's, etc)
     
  8. robert garner

    robert garner Member

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    also keep BOTH eyes open!
    I canteven see pistol sights anymore, butthe aperature sights keep on working!
    Hope you learn to enjoy them as much as I do!
    robert
     
  9. rangerruck

    rangerruck Member

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    bhk is corrct here, also if you are trying to really get teeny groups, you may need a disc for your rear site. if yours is big enough to stick the sharp end of a pencil through, it is too big.
     
  10. lionking

    lionking Member

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    agreed agreed !front sight focus!....no matter what type of iron sights or firearm (except shotgun)used.The day I learned this is the day my shooting skills improved alot.

    Though,I have not had the time or money lately to go shooting often and when I have lately I find myself having to remind myself to focus on the front sight.Practice practice just like anything makes you better.Even after a few shots I start to feel warmed up and can concentrate better.

    focus on the front sight,rear sight blured,target blured.
     
  11. Jenrick

    Jenrick Member

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    One thing I found on line (I'll see if I can find the site and add it later):

    put a small but distinctive mark on the front sight post, that you can only make out when focusing on the front sight. That way whenever you get a sight picture you know for a fact that you're focusing on the front sight. It helped me tremendously at longer ranges.

    -Jenrick
     
  12. Wes Janson

    Wes Janson Member

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    A while back Police Magazine had an article on carbines and peep sights, and I thought it interesting because the author of the article clearly stated that you're to focus on the *rear* sight instead of the front. Really bad brain-fart that no one caught? Or some sort of alternate shooting method I've never heard of?
     
  13. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    I would say it was a brain fart. If you concentrate on the rear sight, your not going to hit much.

    One downside to peep sights (also affects Scout scopes) is low sun behind you. It makes it difficult to see the front post due to the rear sight being brightly illuminated.

    While I really do like peep sights, I do think the big HK notch on their G3's/HK91's and the open, leaf type, like on the AK's and most hunting rifles, are better for fast shooting, in all light, from 100 yards in.
     
  14. 30Cal

    30Cal Member

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    I make a concious effort to align the sights (most of that is assured by a consistant head position and a good stock/cheek weld).

    For easy targets, you can just focus on the front sight and let the alignment take care of itself. If you want to see what the rifle can really do, you'll have to work for each and every shot.

    Ty
     
  15. de

    de member

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    Having been a police dept. firearms instructer and tactical team leader and trainer, I can tell you bhk is positively correct. Your eye will automatically seek the best focus when looking thru the apeture with the best view being dead center. Your nose should be no more than two inches from the rear sight and focus on the target with the front sight being centered on desired poa. Look thru the peep sight, but ignore it, and let your eye do its job. You will see you groups shrink. For close in flip (less than 100yds) up the ghost right rear and experience one of the fastest sight alignments ever.
     
  16. dmftoy1

    dmftoy1 Member

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    Thanks guys! I think I need to keep practicing!! :)

    The reason I was asking was that I had kept trying to put the wings on the AR front sight at a consistent spot on the outline of the circle and that seems to me to be an impossibly task. I think i'll just adjust my head position a bit (as recommended) and concentrate solely on the front sight.

    Thanks again,
    Dave
     
  17. Swampy

    Swampy Member

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    Good plan..... as the method you were using previously (indexing off the front sight wings) is a sure way to induce putting the top of the SIGHT POST in a different location every time..... and if the top of the post is not in the same place every time, the bullet won't go to the same place either.

    The reason this is so is that any inconsistency in head placement fore and aft (If you are indexing off the sight wings) means that the top of the front post is changing its position relative to the center of the rear aperture with each shot. Not a good way to keep'em all going to the same place.

    IGNORE the rear sight
    IGNORE the front sight wings

    Concentrate purely on front post FOCUS (And head placement consistency) and you will be miles ahead.

    Best regards,
    Swampy

    Garands forever
     
  18. SSN Vet

    SSN Vet Member

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    impressed with peeps...

    I just started a thread today detailing my first range session with my newly installed Williams 5D on my Marlin 336.

    The way my eyes "automatically" centered the front sight was really cool. I think I definitely made the right choice going with the peeps vs. a scope on this rifle.
     
  19. techmike

    techmike Member

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    A good rule of thumb on an ar-15/m-16 is to toucgh the tip of your nose to the charging handle. It gets your eye in about the right spot and helps you be consistant.
     
  20. Zullo74

    Zullo74 member

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    Unless you've got a really long neck, you can't touch your nose to the charging handle in offhand and still have the A2 buttplate against your shoulder. If you are shooting NRA Highpower competition, NRA rule 5.12 allows for the butt to be placed anywhere from the elbow to the shoulder (upper arm). I wouldn't recommend trying the nose on the charging handle with the butt on top of the shoulder scenario with an un-weighted AR-15/M-16. It WILL bruise your nose! FWIW JMHO YMMV :D
     
  21. techmike

    techmike Member

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    I don't shoot competition with my ar's and mine wear A-1 stocks (except for my sbr's). ymmv, but nose to ch works well for me and a number of others as well. May not work for you and apparently not for Zullo74.:) Only way to find out is to give it a try.
     
  22. blackhawk2000

    blackhawk2000 member

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    I always put my nose on the charging handle, and it never bruises.
     
  23. AK103K

    AK103K Member

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    If you have a mustache, you may want to hold your nose back just a tad. The resulting hair caught in the charging handle is more painful and distracting than a bump on the nose. :)
     
  24. BigG

    BigG Member

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    Don't get me wrong - I don't shoot competitive high power but I know gamers look for every opportunity to get more points.

    A better rule of thumb is: You should learn to bring the gun to your face, not your face to the gun. Adjust the gun so it comes up to your natural good shooting position and has a good sight picture. Do not adjust yourself to the gun's idiosyncrasies.

    As far as how to shoot the standard peep sight -The guys are correct who said look through it and put the tip of the front sight where you want to hit.
     
  25. X-Rap

    X-Rap Member

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    I may have missed it but no one recomended using the front ears as alignment for the edge of the aperture then the front sight should be adjusted to allow target to sit uppon front post. If this is done at 100m and rear is set such the sights should be calibrated for issue ammo.

    Works for me.
     
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