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When was the last clip-loading semi-auto pistol made?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Yujun, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Yujun

    Yujun Member

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    After reading this awesome American Rifleman article, I'm getting a bit curious about clip-loading semi-autos. I'm really curious to know exactly when they went out of style. Based off of my basic research, as far as I can tell, the final clip-loading semi-auto to be produced was the Steyr-Hahn M1912.

    Is that correct? (Also, its name is a misnomer, as the pistol was developed in 1911 and was formally adopted by the Austrian army in 1914 so I have no clue why it's called the M1912)
     
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  2. MikeInOr

    MikeInOr Member

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    My guess would have been a C96 Broomhandle... so you win! My Broomhandle isn't nearly as quick to reload as my 1911. Even the P38 with the butt mag release is quicker than trying to shove a clip into a Broomhandle... of course I have a bit more practice reloading magazines.

    Clips probably went out of favor so manufactures could charge outrageous prices for magazines.
     
  3. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    Grendel P10, late 1980s
     
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  4. TTv2

    TTv2 Member

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    The P10 Grendel. It was a .380 ACP. Can find them cheap on Gunbroker.
     
  5. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    Who would want to? Lol.

    I have a P12 I grabbed for a touch over $100 awhile back, got it to run for the most part with some tinkering, but it's not a gun I would bet my life on. Just a curiosity/plinker. The P10 was no more reliable, just slower to reload.
     
  6. Yujun

    Yujun Member

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    :what:Holy moly! Never would have imagined a stripper clip-loading pistol was still being made as late as 1991! And it was made by George Kellgren too :eek:

    Wow! Thanks for the info guys!
     
  7. TTv2

    TTv2 Member

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    There was a very brief moment I thought about getting one, but that faded pretty quickly mostly because the DAO trigger looked like it was built only for aliens with long fingers.
     
  8. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    Kelgren's premise with the Grendel P10 is often missed. He was marketing the pistol to those who would only swear by a .38 snub revolver for their intended purpose, and one such group was LEOs seeking a good ankle BUG option. At the time, many (including this one) were hesitant to strap an autoloader down there due to concerns over external controls (magazine releases and safety levers) being accidentally actuated during the rigors of police patrol. Kelgren thought that these officers, as well as civilians licensed to carry (Florida, the company's home state, had just passed its landmark concealed-carry law) would like something with the simplicity in firing that the J-frame had, pull, point, and "press-to-play." But Kelgren's offering would deliver this in a package that was lighter, flatter, easier to conceal, and offered more than twice the round count. There was no magazine release and no safety lever; the only external control was the slide stop.

    Rapid reloading was not a priority. Truth was, it wasn't much with those J-frames as well; few cops with an ankle gun had a reload for it, and probably just as many licensed civilian carriers did also.

    The gun was directly marketed to my agency at the time, and several of us got into the deal. It was indeed less than reliable, and holster options were limited. On top of that, the company's limited size and marketing abilities prevented further development.

    I carried mine back then in a pocket sometimes when off-duty, but never as an on-duty BUG due to the lack of a suitable holster. I still have it, along with the clips, clip alignment/takedown tool, case, grip extender, and manual. Clip-loading was never easy.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
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  9. dodo bird

    dodo bird Member

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  10. JohnBiltz

    JohnBiltz Member

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    I bought a Grendel P10 back in the day, mine was pretty reliable as I remember it. But that was not its reputation. At the time revolvers were a lot more prominent than today and so shooters were much more used to a double action. It was never meant to be reloaded. But it was a small pretty easy to shoot carry gun with a 10 round capacity. Back then capacity was a very big thing.
     
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  11. Monac

    Monac Member

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    I had a Grendel too. I can no longer remember what it was like to shoot, because I got rid of it 30-odd years ago. What I remember is that you were NOT supposed to dry fire it, because the hammer was made out of sheet steel that looked to be about 1/8 inch thick, IIRC. I bought it exactly because of the novelty of the stripper clip loading. I must have lost interest in it fast, because I never went to the expense of getting a stripper clip for it.

    I recall the gun being fairly thick, because the magazine held 10 rounds, which I guess was determined by the size of the stripper clip. I think it used M-16 clips.
     
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