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Where are reloading components made?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by bds, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. bds

    bds Senior Member

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    I recently had a discussion with other reloaders whether the origin of their reloading components mattered.

    Some stated they try to buy USA made whenever possible and others said they reload for absolute accuracy that is brand specific (VihtaVuori, RL15, etc.) and would not change even though they were not USA made.

    I am a curious person and open to product combinations that may produce even more accurate loads than what I have been using. But current economic downturn prompted me to consider supporting USA companies when I can. I did a quick inventory of my reloading stock on hand and considered whether I would substitute or not. I welcome suggestions for better substitutes.

    How about you? Would you consider changing components to USA made equivalent?


    Winchester 231 - Made in USA
    Winchester Super Target - Made in USA
    Winchester Super Field - Made in USA

    Hodgdon HP-38 - Made in USA
    Hodgdon Titegroup - Made in USA
    Hodgdon Clays - Made in Australia (can substitute with Bullseye/Promo speed-wise but they are not as clean burning)
    Hodgdon H335 - Made in USA
    Hodgdon H4895 - Made in Australia (thought IMR 4895, but that's made in Canada ... not sure which powder is equivalent)
    Hodgdon Varget - Made in Australia (this is a tough one ... not sure if I can find a substitute. Maybe IMR 4064 but not sure where IMR 4064 is made)

    Alliant Bullseye - Made in USA
    Alliant Green Dot - Made in USA
    Alliant Unique - Made in USA
    Alliant Promo - Made in USA
    Alliant Reloader 15 - Made in Sweden (Hmmm ... not sure which powder comes close)

    VihtaVuori N320 - Made in Finland (I am stuck ... I don't think there is a substitute for this powder)

    Winchester Primers - Made in USA
    CCI Primers - Made in USA
    Magtech Primers - Made in Brazil (can substitute with Winchester/CCI)
    Wolf primers - Made in Russia (can substitute with Winchester/CCI)
    PMC primers - Made in Russia (can substitute with Winchester/CCI)
    Tula primers - Made in Russia (can substitute with Winchester/CCI)

    Hornady bullets - Made in USA
    Winchester bullets - Made in USA
    Montana Gold bullets - Made in USA
    Remington Golden Saber bullets - Made in USA
    Rainier plated bullets - Made in USA
    Berry's plated bullets - Made in USA
    PowerBond plated bullets - Made in USA
    Missouri lead bullets - Made in USA
    X-Treme bullets - Made in USA
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    AA #2 is close. Not as good, but close. Not made here either though.
     
  3. twofifty

    twofifty Senior Member

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    bds, you are correct that Alliant Reloder 15 is made in Sweden.

    Hodgdon H380 is USA made.
    IMR 700-X is made in Canada.
     
  4. bds

    bds Senior Member

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    So, is there an equivalent USA made substitute for H4895/IMR4895? Ramshot TAC maybe?


    How about for Varget and RL15? Can someone verify where IMR 4064 is made? And would Hodgdon BL-C(2) be comparable made in USA substitute?
     
  5. Marlin 45 carbine

    Marlin 45 carbine Senior Member

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    I have used MagTech cases (bought already primed from Natchez) and bullets for the .380acp. as good as any USA and less expensive.
    some of the cases are on their 8th loading (nothing 'hot' just target/plinking cast rn's) and still tight primer fit.
     
  6. jcwit

    jcwit Senior Member

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    [QUOTEI have used MagTech cases (bought already primed from Natchez) and bullets for the .380acp. as good as any USA and less expensive.
    some of the cases are on their 8th loading (nothing 'hot' just target/plinking cast rn's) and still tight primer fit. ][/QUOTE]

    Thanks for supporting the Off-Shore economy!

    Would it not be better to support the American Worker?
     
  7. redman900

    redman900 Member

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    Where are reloading components made?


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    why reloading P.A. of course
     
  8. OpelBlitz

    OpelBlitz Member

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    :confused:
     
  9. OpelBlitz

    OpelBlitz Member

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    I would consider switching to US-made products for some things if the quality warrants it. I can't imagine quality making a whole lot of difference in powder though. I have very little faith in our economy regardless of what I buy, to be honest.
     
  10. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    As folks scarf up Wolf and Tula primers, shoot Russian and Chinese steel cased ammo, and buy guns made in a lot of other countries.......

    called being competitive, and most folks here seem to vote with their wallet, not their fellow Americans in their mind
     
  11. 1SOW

    1SOW Senior Member

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    FC Primers, I believe are made in the USA

    From your list, TWO countries standout as not only "not made in the USA, but as also "not an ally of the USA" (to say the least).
    In prioritizing your "changes needed" list might make these #1 and # 1.5

    Anyone know where "Zero" bullets are "made"?
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  12. Gryffydd

    Gryffydd Senior Member

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    As *I* am an American worker I do my best to support myself by not spending more than I have to on something. If American companies can't be competitive at something maybe they'd be serving themselves and the American economy better by doing something they can compete at.

    On the other hand, I can see how a cross reference of American made powders to their closest imported equivalents as coming in pretty handy in the event of import restrictions or other such tricks that could be played by an Administration such as we have now.
     
  13. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Senior Member

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    There's not a duplicate because this is a single-base powder. There are very few single-base powders to choose from, Solo 1000 being one of them.
     
  14. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Senior Member

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    Smack dab in the middle of God's Country.... Cullman, Alabama !!
     
  15. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Only bad thing about that is if I order them from Roze Distribution here in Alabama, I have to pay tax. Great bullets at a very good price though.

    Great powder, but more akin to N310.
     
  16. A and O

    A and O Member

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    Thank You bds for providing the list. Most if not almost all reloading equipment appears to be made here in the good old USA. I really don't seem to have a problem with purchases from anywhere aside from Asia and the former Soviet Empire. And perhaps India and that region are on the bad vibes list as well.
     
  17. rodregier

    rodregier Senior Member

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    Gee, never heard of reloading components from India or Pakistan being offered for sale in the US (or Canada for that matter). I suspect their domestic production is used to fabricate ammunition, not sold as components for export.
     
  18. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

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    I don't know about that. I won't buy anything made in Russia, France, or China (if I can determine the source). Since learning RCBS's presses are made w/ Chinese aluminum, I have stopped buying ANYTHING from RCBS.
     
  19. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Senior Member

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    I already drive a Toyota, so I guess it doesn't matter who makes my reloading gear. :uhoh:
     
  20. Minnesota Wild

    Minnesota Wild Member

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    For those that think you're getting an American product by buying products produced by an American company, I'm sorry to break it to you: There's almost no such thing as a truly domestic product. If you don't want to buy an RCBS press because it's made from Chinese-sourced aluminum, you better not buy a Lee or a Dillon or a Lyman either. In this globalized society, nearly all products are in some way affiliated with foreign countries. Given that there is very little domestically produced steel (China is currently the largest procucer of raw steel, producing about 10 times the amount of steel as the US annually) and virtually no domestically mined aluminum (Australia is the largest producer, followed by Brazil and China), probably every reloading product you own contains components that have been in the stream of commerce (mined, smelted, component production) in China, India, Russia, or another foreign country.

    Even with the components you're talking about above, it's exceedingly likely that the metals were mined in a foreign country or the base mixing chemicals for the powders or priming compounds were sourced somewhere else...often in a third-world country to minimize the costs of producing dangerous chemicals. Too often we shout "buy American," then fail to consider what we are actually buying. Final production of a good does not equal domestic production, but foreign-sourced products are not necessarily all bad.

    I don't mean to hijack this thread. It's very interesting to note where things are actually produced, even by domestic companies. But it people want to be truly informed about the source from which they are buying, they need to go beyond looking at where the bullet was cast or the powder chemicals were mixed. And if you won't buy an RCBS press because they source their aluminum from China, you need to get yourself educated about a lot more of the products in your life because you're about to start living very simply.
     
  21. twofifty

    twofifty Senior Member

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    ^^^^^
    And you won't be shopping Wal-Mart or the big-box home-decor/home-reno stores either...or watching TV...or using a cellphone... or or.

    Let's face it, the global economy that exported so many good American manufacturing jobs to Asia is the doing of American big business, not the fault of the Chinese, Koreans, Indians.

    A quick aside about France bashing:
    Never forget that France supported the 13 Colonies with ships, guns, troops and credit during the Revolutionary War against the British. For examle, there were French regiments on the front lines during the siege of Yorktown. The reality is that France and the US never fought a war against each other.

    But we had a heck of a time fighting the Germans...whose overpriced cars many Americans love to drive.
     
  22. A and O

    A and O Member

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    As one of the above posters noted. He buys American where possible. Me too. That said, I drive a Tundra assembled in San Antonio with 70% domestic content. The wifey scoots around in a Pilot assembled in the US of A as well with a 70% parts content. I'll not buy a GM product ever again until the free market comes back. Without getting overly political the outsourcing of our Industrial base is by design by both Domestic and Foreign enemies.
     
  23. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Hmmmmmm, my RCBS presses are neither aluminum nor imported. They are cast iron/steel AND they are guaranteed for life.

    There is NOTHING you will buy in a normal situation that isn't part of the global manufacturing community community
     
  24. mcdonl

    mcdonl Senior Member

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    Yeah, well he vacations in Maine :)
     
  25. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

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    Depends on when it was made. With one exception, all my presses are more than 15-years old; well before we started importing Chinese aluminum and NAFTA. I'll have to check and see where the steel came from the other.

    But I will continue to buy components advertised as being made in America or made in Russia or China or France, even if it means spending more.
     

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