Where would you hunt?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by bsparker, Dec 8, 2020.

  1. George P

    George P Member

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    If you have a drone, you could always use that to scout from above - you might see some things that help you be successful.
     
  2. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    That's good news. I would expect both of those spots to be good. I can see why the area at the base of the "finger" (west of the "S" in Spring) would be good. That is on the easiest path up that mountain. Any farther north and the slope is quite steep. Moving west gets you to Option 2 which is also steeper than this area.

    It is similar to the area I described SE of "Grave." About half way between "Grave" and the 1100' elevation marker (to the SE) there is a relatively narrow gentle slope between two steep sections.
     
  3. wombat13

    wombat13 Member

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    By the way, my property is on the opposite side of the Appalachians from yours. Mine is in the foothills of the Appalachians on the border between NY and PA. Elevation ranges from 1500' to 2200'. Very similar topography as yours.
     
    stillquietvoice likes this.
  4. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    The drainages to the south of option 1 and 2 look good to me. Those are generally travel routes in hilly country and can act like funnels depending on the surrounding terrain. They also provide cover so can be used as escape routes when deer are pressured. What you map doesn't show is food sources which would dictate travel too.
     
  5. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Seems a lot of folks are concerned with predominate wind direction. Back when I hunted flat land this was a major concern and made stand placement easy. Just set up on the South East side of the trail. While wind is still a concern in hilly country, in areas of steep grade, the only predominate winds will be at the top of the ridge or down in the lower valleys. This is what makes hunting(at least with primitive weapons) tough in ridges and coulees. Wind will swirl up and down valleys. Then there's the thermals and inversion winds that happen at prime hunting hours(dusk and dawn) when predominate winds are calm. Remember the old phase "up in the morning and down at night''? Sittin' in a deep drainage can keep your scent above the deer and can accent the thermals to your advantage.
     
  6. bsparker

    bsparker Member

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    I've got a plan to hit that drainage area below option 2 tomorrow morning, might sit 1/3 of the way up the hill overlooking it. I walked this area with my son a couple weeks ago and saw a couple good rubs.

    If I recall correctly, it's fairly clear looking down but gets thick going up. I haven't fully marked food areas. Something I need to do and learn more about. There are a good number of oak (white, black and pin) everywhere, along with several walnut trees. The drainage areas tend to have some ground vegetation/greens, but not a whole lot.
     
  7. Robbins290

    Robbins290 Member

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    I would walk as much as i could, See what the whole area looks like. But based just off that map? I would go option #3
     
  8. Offhand McFlan

    Offhand McFlan Member

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    Maybe near option 2 and a little further down in the valley or closer to one of the nearby streams. That's about all I can offer just looking at map of a place I'm otherwise clueless about. In my area deer like like to criss-cross their trails near springs and streams.i have no idea of the foliage where you're at, but I prefer more up close and personal than long shots.
     
  9. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Oaks are pretty seasonal and depending on amount of mast produced and what all is eating it, it may or may not be a late season food source. There may be other more subtle winter food sources like wintergreen, watercress or young poplars/other browse. This time of year, if the deer are feeding on acorns, you will be able to see where they are scratching.
     
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