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which loading hand book ?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by snnewbie2020, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. snnewbie2020

    snnewbie2020 Member

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    Can some one suggest me a reload hand book that have load data at least for the 3 type of bullet I have , RMR round nose 115 gr , RMR round nose 124 gr , and RMR 124 TC.
    I bough a Lyman load data for pistol on Amazon $7 and also I have the online version of Lyman 48th edition, they don't have any data that I can use .
    Thank you!
     
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  2. warnerwh

    warnerwh Member

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    Just because the books don't give you an exact recipe for your particular components doesn't mean they don't have loads that will work for you. First thing is to look at the bullet weight and I think most of us use the cast bullet loads with plated bullets. You need to start light and work your way up looking for pressure signs. In reality most all reloading books are useful for most any combination of components. Be sure to start the powder charge at the lower end of the recommendation and you will be fine. You must use the load data for the exact bullet weight you are using, not necessarily the brand.

    The beauty of reloading your own ammo is that you have numerous bullets, powder, brass and primer combinations you can try. There are far too many bullets for those who publish reloading manuals to test every bullet for each powder charge.
     
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  3. bluetopper

    bluetopper Member

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    You have 115gr and 124 gr jacketed bullets from RMR and in your manual you have 115gr and 124gr jacketed bullet reloading data. Please tell me what more do you want?
     
  4. rabid wombat

    rabid wombat Member

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    @snnewbie2020 , first welcome...

    second, as @warnerwh indicates....a lot has to be read into the formulas. I would first ask the forum what loads they use for your bullet choices (in caliber...I a guessing 9mm), while providing the pistol you are shooting, and the type of shooting you are planning to do. I would take what you see in reply, and compare to your catalogs (never trust the web for loads, verify alway). Depending where your load choice fall, start a little lower (never max, I would not start below published mins for the bullet weight). Work your way from there. Be safe, and enjoy....

    I would provIde a load that works for me, but I am shooting 147 gr in 9mm.....
     
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  5. Hartkopf

    Hartkopf Member

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    It’s good to have multiple sources so you can cross check loads. Just buy more books and check online sources. Specifically though, check Speers load data for 115 and 124gr plated bullets. Speer has a plated bullet that is almost identical to RMRs.

    Speer #4712 is a 115gr copper plated round nose.
     
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  6. Todd NE WY

    Todd NE WY Member

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    Western powders has some RMR bullets listed in their online manual. At least the 115 round nose in 9mm.
     
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  7. PWC

    PWC Member

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    If this isn't sufficient, go to bullet/ powder mfgr's website.
     
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  8. Mr. Zorg

    Mr. Zorg Member

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    Hodgdon Reloading Data Center has 9m Luger load data specific to Berry’s Bullets 124 grain bullets FWIW. OP: It'd be easier to try to assist if we knew, instead of guess, what cartridge you plan to use your bullets in at minimum. Additional details won't hurt anything either.

    https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/data/pistol
     
  9. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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  10. snnewbie2020

    snnewbie2020 Member

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  11. dh1633pm

    dh1633pm Member

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    To be honest I use a variety of sources. I then make a spreadsheet of that data. I use data from multiple manuals, Hornady, Lyman, & older manuals, plus the data I can find from a component maker. I can then sort the data to make better choices and compare data. I also prefer electronic versions whenever possible. For example with the kindle app you can send PDF files to be converted to kindle. That way data is always in one place. Books are great, I have many, but for me electronic is the way to go.
     
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  12. Dudedog
    • Contributing Member

    Dudedog Contributing Member

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    The powder companies web sites are free and are always worth checking.
    Alliant, Hodgdon (includes Winchester and IMR), Shooters World (Lovex), VV all have data online.

    You may not find much specific to RMR Bullets (great bullets, great company BTW) but you can use data for other FMJ loads to give you an idea.
    If you let us know what powders you have or what you are thinking about buying (what's available to you) members would be happy to say what has worked for them. (which you should always cross check)

    If you are new to reloading and don't have a powder picked, HP38/W231 (same powder different label) is a good choice for a first 9mm powder. (you didn't say 9mm, .38 Super , .357 Sig but guessing 9mm)
    Other powders may give more velocity on top or be more accurate but it works well with different bullet weights and meters decent through a measure.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2020
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  13. mdi

    mdi Member

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    It seems newer reloaders are drawn to "one caliber" load "books". IMO big mistake. I haven't looked at the Lyman one caliber books, but I highly recommend a regular, published reloading manual, as there is a lot more info than just reload data in them. I just glanced at my Lyman 49th (I keep my 49th on my desk and my 50th in the shop along with my other manuals). The 49th has 9mm data for jacketed bullets from 90 gr. to 147 gr and cast bullets from 90 gr to 147 gr. I have reloaded a lot of RMR bullets in 9mm and have safely used the data right out of my Lyman manual. I use plain old common sense; I choose a bullet of the same general weight and profile, begin with starting loads, and plunk test. If necessary, I increase the velocity until I get an accurate load that functions well in my gun.

    The reloading manuals I use most often, in no order;
    Lyman 48th, 49th, 50th.
    Lyman Cast bullet handbook, 3rd and 4th
    Speer #11 and #15
    Hornady 9th, 10th.
    Nosler #8.
    Hodgdon annual, current edition for 2020.

    I also a few others some from the '70s, '80s and even a Lee manual but the above are used first...

    BTW; I ignore any load data I see on any forum, pet loads website, or hear from any gun counter clerk, range rat, well intended friend, or gun shop guru. I get my data from published manuals and occasionally powder manufacturer's web sites. Since 1969 I have had one squib and zero kabooms...
     
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  14. mcb

    mcb Member

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    I don't use printed manuals much if at all anymore. All my data comes from the internet and often gets filtered through Quickloads if it's a less reliable source (including the occasion start from scratch loads I have worked up). After loading a particular load it goes into my own personally reloading database with any pertinent notes and when I get chrono data for the load that gets added to the entry.
     
  15. LiveLife

    LiveLife Member

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    This is very important.

    Distrust any random "loads" posted or mentioned - ALWAYS reference published load data for your load development.

    Yes, I post load data on THR but will ALWAYS LINK source published load data alongside so those reading can verify the accuracy.

    Be safe.
     
  16. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    I load a ton of different bullets from different manufacturers and I always cross check them with my Lyman manual. You can email rmr and they will provide you with some load guidance for their bullets I have done that as well.
     
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  17. snnewbie2020

    snnewbie2020 Member

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  18. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    No published source (not manuals, not internet, not manufacturers) will give you data that exactly matches the results from your gun. That is not what the published sources are telling you. Load recipes are only a lab report. All they are saying is "This is what we did, and the result we got. No one got hurt. If you stay close to this, then you'll be safe too."

    There are always 100 tiny variations from the load recipe in any reloaded cartridge. These include primer brand, powder lot, altitude, barrel length, bullet-to-barrel fit, temperature, scale calibration, etc, etc. So as long as you use equivalent components (e.g. 124gr jacketed with 124gr jacketed data) you'll be OK. The vast majority of your safety concerns are worked out by beginning at the Starting Load and then working up in small increments. We use the interchangeable terms "working up a load", "incremental loads", or "load ladders" to describe this testing process.

    rcu66Lu.jpg

    If you want to exactly match the recipe data, then you need to by a chrono. When your bullet's velocity matches the bullet velocity in the recipe, then you're as close as you can get.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  19. Kevin Rohrer

    Kevin Rohrer Member

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    Too many beginners overthink things and would benefit from having someone show them The Path To Enlightenment (i.e. proper reloading).
     
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  20. Skgreen

    Skgreen Member

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    1st, Welcome to THR, OP.

    Most new reloaders would like a COL. As could be the case with the OP, finding published COL data doesn't exist for every bullet ever made leaves one in doubt.

    When I started, I dreaded using the 'plunk' method of determining COL. Not sure why, but I felt 'more comfortable' w/Calipers / data.

    Of course, not all bullet profiles (or firearm leades) are the same, so I eventually ran into issues.

    Started 'plunkin' and found out my fears were unfounded. (Waaaaaaaaaaaay easier than I had imagined)

    Hope this helps.
     
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  21. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    Then the Op would be very disappointed with some of the older Lyman manuals because my 45th doesn't have a single oal in the entire manual
     
  22. irishlad

    irishlad Member

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    When I first started reloading I only bought hornady bullets, because I had a hornady manual. After I got more comfortable reloading I expanded my bullet choices.
     
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  23. Mr. Zorg

    Mr. Zorg Member

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    There's a reasonably wide variety of load data and reloading information available digitally in the three directories at this web link. Speer, Lyman, Lee, powder companies, single cartridge load books and load maps a true wealth. It's not necessarily the most current but as mentioned many bullet and powder company websites have their latest information available online directly as part of their web sites.

    http://marvinstuart.com/firearm/Manuals/Reloading/
     
  24. Skgreen

    Skgreen Member

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    My 'several years old' 50th does,,,
    There are other reasons why one should not rely solely on older manuals, but, old is still better than nothing.
     
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  25. mdi

    mdi Member

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    I agree 100% with rfwobbly's above post; manuals are lab reports, not hard and fast formula. Using starting loads is the safest way to proceed with reloading a new to you cartridge ( started reloading in '69 and I still use starting loads for new to me calibers. I see way too many newer reloaders say "I started in the middle" or "I started at the max. and worked down"). I keep good records on my computer and in a 3 ring binder in my shop. I use my log for subsequent load data for load development but use the manual starting load for a load work up...
     
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