Quantcast

Who has flown with a handgun?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Inebriated, Feb 3, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. dirtengineer

    dirtengineer Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Messages:
    315
    Location:
    Southeast WA
    Ammo rules vary by carrier. Check with your airline. My experiences have been positive for the most part.
     
  2. hueyville

    hueyville Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    535
    Location:
    Blue Ridge Mountains
    Many.times, no hassle. Go to the Delta desk, drop my Delta Medallion Award Card they come.to attention and.say how can we help you sir? I sit my cases on the counter. Hand them pre filled out forms and they go ahead and get me a boarding pass while there. Back pre 9/11 I actually arrived at locations twice to realize had pistol in my carry on that had forgotten to remove. Bet those days are gone.
     
  3. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Messages:
    22,649
    Location:
    northern california
    That usually won't work, you have to be a bit more obvious. I usually say, "I have a handgun in my luggage to check in"

    I've flow all over the country with my handguns while teaching and it has been very smooth...only had on place that they needed me to open the case (FL)

    I usually fly with Southwest and Continental and try not to fly through NY or DC airports
     
  4. gearhead

    gearhead Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Messages:
    646
    Well... A serialized item isn't ALWAYS a handgun...
     
  5. 2ifbyC

    2ifbyC Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2010
    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Arizona
    I flew from Omaha, NE to Pittsburgh, PA to go deer hunting with my friends. I carried a Remington 7mm magnum in a rifle soft case along with a S&W Model 19 .357 Magnum packed inside. I carried the rifle/pistol and boarded the plane. The pilot zipped open the case & the .357 fell out. No one had checked the gun case prior to boarding. The pilot placed the gun case in the cockpit and I picked it upon landing.

    Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that the year was 1971; a trip down memory lane to let some of you know how different things were then.
     
  6. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2005
    Messages:
    1,191
    Location:
    Moses Lake WA
    I climbed on a plane in Seattle, WA with 3 pistols in my coat pockets, a rifle in a soft case, a shotgun in a soft case and another rifle in a scabard as carry-on. Flew Alaska Airlines to Anchorage, caught a flight to Fairbanks and then changed airlines to Nome and then out to Granite Mountain. Of course this was in 1966. ;)

    I checked in to American Airlines in San Diego and the counter lady said I'd have to check my Old Timer 1040T pocket knife through luggage. The only box she could find was a rifle box, so that little pocket knife went into it and it was all taped up for the trip to DC. :D That was in 1986.

    Pops
     
  7. MrCleanOK

    MrCleanOK Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Messages:
    1,383
    Location:
    Alaska
    With regards to ammunition packaging, it can go in the case with the firearm itself. To satisfy the packing requirements, the origainal factory packaging will usually work. Some factory boxes are flimsy enough that you want to wrap them in tape. It's not fun to hunt for 100 loose pistol catridiges inside a Pelican rifle case. Also, you can leave your ammo in the magazines as long as they are outside the gun. I put tape over the tops and that has always satisfied the counter rep that they are securely packaged.
     
  8. Alaska444

    Alaska444 member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    1,136
    Interesting, I lived in Nome in 1966 and now I live in Coeur D Alene ID. Looked up Granite Mountain, looks like a bit of drive from Nome. Was that by plane, I don't remember roads going that far from Nome itself?

    I bought a box of 38 shells for less than $10.00 in 1967 when I was only 9.
     
  9. chris in va

    chris in va Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Messages:
    6,113
    Location:
    Louisville KY
    I flew from Louisville to DFW and back last year.

    Going out was easy, declare unloaded handgun in my Pelican case and it was sent through X-ray. No TSA agent showed up.

    Coming back was different, they told me to wheel my bag to the TSA office around the corner. I stood there for ten minutes before realizing I had to "ahem" for someone to show up. She was terse...took my bag and ran it through a machine. She stood there looking at me and I said, "Do i need to take it back to the counter" and her answer was "no".

    Now five years ago I flew to Huntsville AL. The counter guy thought I was LEO and handed me a form authorizing me to carry a loaded firearm on board. He got a bit flustered when I gently corrected him. TSA took over and used a wood wand to inspect my case. When I got back, my bag didn't come out on the carousel. 45 minutes go by and just as I was about to have a chat, I noticed my bag was stuffed in a corner. Inside was a TSA 'love letter' stating the contents of the bag were inspected.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  10. TAKtical

    TAKtical Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2012
    Messages:
    654
    Location:
    North east ohio
    It has been a non issue in my experience. When you check your bag, notify the person at the counter. They will want to see it, someone from TSA will want to see it, and it should only take about 5 extra minutes.
     
  11. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Messages:
    1,723
    Location:
    NC Coast
    I was asked about this coming out of DFW last Friday... first time it has happened to me.

    DFW TSA always puts the notice in my bag while I watch them inspect the suitcase. Most of my trips to and from DFW have been quite pleasant with TSA, cheerfully asking me what kind of gun I have, some chit chat about their preferences. I have no doubt you will encounter the occasional aloof agent.
     
  12. ball3006

    ball3006 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    2,874
    Location:
    Texas
    It has been awhile since I have flown with a gun. I don't think you can carry loaded magazines. The ammo has to be in an original box or one designed for ammo.....chris3
     
  13. cluck

    cluck Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    68
    Location:
    Gun Lovin' Utah
    YEEE HAAW! That is a big box of fun!!!
     
  14. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,691
    Location:
    Stanwood, WA
    It is also a rule that you are not clear on. You don't hand the key or combo over to them, that is against Federal regulations. If they want the case unlocked/opened then the passenger unlocks it, never giving the key/combo to anyone.

    49 CFR 1540.111
    http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-id...v8&view=text&node=49:9.1.3.5.9.2.10.6&idno=49


    Airline dependent. Most airlines allow loaded magazines, if the magazines are in a pouch, or there is some other covering over the top of the magazine so there are no rounds exposed on top.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  15. Drail

    Drail Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    6,028
    The best thing you can do is to print out the airline carrier's rules and carry them in your pocket. Fully expect that the airline employee at the ticket counter has never seen a gun before and has no idea what the company rules are and may pass out when they see a real gun. Seriously. They are supposed to check the gun to ensure it is unloaded BEFORE they have you sign the tag that claims it is unloaded but most of the time they don't even want to see the gun. Make sure they place the tag INSIDE the gun case and not on the outside of the luggage. When you step to counter and announce that you need to declare a firearm MAKE SURE they DO NOT ASSSUME that you are an LEO. They have done this to me several times and you will get to start all over again once you get them to understand that you are not an LEO. As far as the TSA goes, you have a much bigger problem - the TSA does not know their own rules either and generally just make them up on the spot. I believe the TSA may actually have a printed book with all of the rules in it but I do not believe anyone in the TSA has ever actually seen this book. But they will treat you like a criminal if you question anything they demand. Just keep smiling and do not lose your temper. These people can absolutely ruin your day if they don't like your attitude. As stated above, keep the key in your possession no matter what anyone else says. If they want to open the case make them come and find you. Air travel has become so stupid now that I will not ever fly again until the TSA is done away with. I actually used to enjoy flying before all this insanity started.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  16. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,691
    Location:
    Stanwood, WA
    1. There is no requirement for anyone to verify the gun is unloaded. Usually, TSA can see if the gun is unloaded on xray, especially if the slide is locked back in the case, or a cable is installed through the magazine well.

    2. The best place for the declaration tag is OUTSIDE but near the gun case, inside the luggage containing the gun case. The declaration tag will show up on xray, and if TSA desires to verify that the declaration tag is signed by the passenger, they can open the outside luggage, without the passenger being present, and verify the tag is signed without disturbing the locked gun case. TSA locks should be used on the luggage containing the gun case locked with standard, non-TSA locks otherwise TSA will just cut the lock on the outer luggage and enclose the cut lock with their notice of inspection in your luggage.
     
  17. John3921

    John3921 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2012
    Messages:
    483
    Location:
    Montana
    This procedure has been my experience - and what folks I know who travel frequently experience:

    Use a NON-TSA approved lock. While many will tell you to use a TSA approved lock, this is actually prohibited by 49CFR 1540.111, the regulation that governs firearm transportation. It should be noted that the TSA usually allows the use of TSA locks but in reality they are not legal as they are designed to be opened buy a TSA master key, which is expressly prohibited by the above regulation. The TSA will ask you to unlock the case or provide them a key (do not give them the combination if a combination lock is used), then they will visually inspect the packing of your gun, after which they will either have you re-lock your case or they will re-lock it and return your key. TSA agents are not trained or allowed to handle firearm, so no contact should me made in that manner. If an agent feels the firearm requires in-depth inspection, they must have a law enforcement officer come over to perform that function. If re-inspection is deemed necessary after the bag is checked, they will locate the owner and have them open the case again, so it is wise to remain in the area or on the aircraft after checking the firearm. Buy the best non-TSA locks you can find.

    My limited experience has been that the TSA guys will not allow you to touch the case once it's in their hands. They want you present when they open the case and re-lock the case with your key. I didn't use the combo lock - just the key locks on my case. When we flew to a shoot in Phoenix the TSA guys had no problem touching/inspecting some rather expensive shotguns.

    Edit: Navy - you are of course correct that you and you alone should have the key and you and you alone should open the case on TSA direction - I'm not sure TSA is consistent about it though!
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2013
  18. ezkl2230

    ezkl2230 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    143
    The TSA have changed their regs on this. Here is an excerpt from an email I received from the TSA information center last week:

    In fact there is at least one rifle case manufacturer that has begun providing TSA approved locks on their products (we carry it at Cabela's).

    Having said that, the best practice is not using the TSA approved locks; use a lock for which only you have the key.

    As for transporting ammo, TSA regs require that it either be in the original box (preferably securely taped shut) or in a case specifically designed to transport quantities of ammo (again, preferably securely taped shut). If there is any question, copies of these regs can be downloaded from the TSA web site and presented to airline employees and TSO's for clarification.

    Written by a former TSO.
     
  19. NavyLCDR

    NavyLCDR member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2005
    Messages:
    7,691
    Location:
    Stanwood, WA
    TSA may have changed their internal regulations, but Federal regulations contained in 49 CFR 1540.111 have NOT changed. I would choose to comply with Federal Regulations, rather than TSA internal regulations:
    Current as of February 26, 2013:
    http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-id...v8&view=text&node=49:9.1.3.5.9.2.10.6&idno=49

    The Federal regulation requiring "only the passenger retains the key or combination" certainly does NOT mean "Travelers may use any kind or type of lock for securing firearm cases"
     
  20. velojym

    velojym Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2006
    Messages:
    621
    A few times... but I didn't have to check it or anything. :) It helps when you're the one flying the plane.
     
  21. chili555

    chili555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    South Carolina, by the lake.
    As a matter of fact, I flew from CLT to PHX last September. I announced to the ticket agent, discretely, that I needed to declare a firearm. I was prepared with copies of everything I could find to print. I allowed an extra hour. The ticket agent said, roughly, "OK, fill out this form and sign it. Here, put this copy on top in your bag. Thanks." The whole thing took less than two minutes.

    Upon my return, at PHX, the ticket agent escorted me and my bag to TSA and a nice lady there did essentially the same thing. Even with the trip to TSA, I doubt it delayed my trip more than ten minutes.

    It was all pretty easy.
     
  22. Double_J

    Double_J Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2012
    Messages:
    532
    Location:
    Melbourne Florida
    just flew today. I went from Jacksonville international to Kansas city for a work training course. I went to the counter and told them I needed to declare an unloaded firearm. I showed them it was unloaded and filled out a tag that went inside the suitcase. the only thing that sucked was being told my original case was not good enough as it could be opened up a small crack. that meant I had to buy a case from the airline (generic pelican style) for $40. that was the high point of the entire flight, no tsa check or losr luggage. :)
     
  23. joeschmoe

    joeschmoe Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,291
    I've had problems with the ticket agents making up rules, like requiring a second bag for ammo. She claimed it was not allowed in the same bag. I was only checking one bag.
    Carry print outs of both the airlines rules and TSA rules. I've needed them twice.

    Another time an agent told me to carry my bag to security and declare it there. TSA told me to carry my bag to the plane. I refused and I would not approach the metal detectors. I told them there was a declared firearm in that bag and I would not carry through or touch it on the other side of the metal detectors. They scolded the ticket agent for telling be to carry it to security. Apparently she was supposed to alert them I was coming with a firearm. Dumb procedure, IMO.

    Miami airport makes you do everything twice (happened at least 4 times). First you declare it at the ticket counter. Take it to TSA security, they look at your paper work and x-ray it. Pass, they take the bags, then I go on into concourse. Then I get paged to go to a different TSA security desk to fill out the same paper work again, open the bag again and x-ray, again.
    I have heard the same story from others about Miami.

    They all act like this is a big hassle and your getting special treatment for being "allowed" to do this, but their lawyers know they have no choice. It is a right, and their refusal could destroy their claim to be a "common carrier". It dates back to stage coach laws called "contract of carriage". The terms for flight is still called that and still under the old laws. If they refuse you because of a firearm, you can sue them and they can lose their flight privileges under "contract for carriage".
     
  24. ezkl2230

    ezkl2230 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    143
    Interesting. I sent an email back to the TSA to ask them why there is a discrepancy between the CFR and their regs. The CFR directive is what we used to tell passengers when I worked for the TSA, and now that I am working for an outfitter and many of our customers travel extensively, I want to be sure the information with which I provide them is accurate. I will be very interested to see what kind of a response I receive.
     
  25. Ehtereon11B

    Ehtereon11B internet infantryman

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2012
    Messages:
    983
    Avoid flying with ammunition if you can. If not, follow the same guidelines for flying with a handgun. I have flown with handguns from Atlanta to Boston and back. But not ammo.

    1: Declare at counter. Clearly state that it is unloaded. Have the case unlocked and unlatched because they will probably verify it. Some just throw it through Xray to see if its unloaded. Don't let ANYONE tell you that they need the key/combo to the case. Especially TSA. That is for you and you alone.

    2: The case you use has to be hard sided, with at least 2 locks (combo or key), and cannot be "Flexed" with your hands. Non descript. No logos, stickers, names etc.

    3. Place the gun case inside your checked luggage. Harder to loose between the counter and plane.

    4: Depending on the airport, get there 2-3 hours early to get through the process of checking a firearm. I was able to fly out of a smaller airport on a connecting flight to Atlanta with firearms and only got their 45 minutes before my flight. Print out the TSA and/or airline procedures on firearms. Because they rarely know their own practices. Just in case.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice