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Why Do People Reload When ...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Satasaurus, Apr 1, 2013.

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  1. rrothgeb

    rrothgeb Member

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    1. becasue you can save 50-70% on each round your shoot, but you shoot up the savings.
    2. once you start, Your free from what every the FED does to ammo.
    3. When the ammo stops being made, you can make your own.
    4. redo you math
     
  2. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    It is not worth my time for handgun rounds. Yea, I could save a few bucks, but my time is worth something. If I were paying myself minimum wages the cost of handloading most handgun rounds would be 2X-3X more expensive than buying it. For all of my handgun and 223 rounds I can buy them cheap enough that it is not worth my time. I do save my brass, and can sell it for enough to offset the cost of new ammo even more.

    I do reload for my centerfire hunting and target rifles. There isn't enough difference in the accuracy between any handgun rounds, shot at typical handgun ranges to matter. But I can improve both the accuracy and velocity of my rifle handloads considerably over even premium ammo. Cheap 30-06 or 308 ammo runs about $20/box of 20 The premium ammo, loaded with premium bullets runs $40-$60/box of 20. I can load premium bullets, get 50-100 fps more velocity, and much better accuracy with my handloads.

    It is worth my time for that.
     
  3. exbrit49

    exbrit49 Member

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    Just re-costed out my reloads

    This last weekend, knowing that my component costs have increased. I set up an excel program and ran a costing analysis on my reloads.
    These are real numbers based on the latest prices at my LGS

    Reloading costs exclude the brass costs for two reasons. Much of my brass is range pick up or purchased used at low cost. In addition straight walled pisto cases last almost forever. (some of my cases have exceed 30 loadings!

    anyway, here's my costs to load a box of 50 rounds: Note: all handgun loads are hard cast.
    45 Colt $7.65
    45 ACP $7.10
    38spl $5.50
    9mm $5.50
    .357 Mag $11.22

    30/30 $7.10 per 20 rounds

    These are not all of the calibers I reload but I think it does show why it I reload.
    Roger
     
  4. Deaf Smith

    Deaf Smith Member

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    You guys need to price ammo today?

    I reload mainly 9mm, .40 S&W, .38 Spl, .357 Magnum, .44 magnum, and .45 ACP. Normally I use Unique powder (in 8 lb canister) and lead slugs (including Moly coated) slugs.

    I also reload .22 Hornet, .223, .270 WSM, 30/30, and .308. Varget is used in them all and I buy it in bulk. Same for the slugs to.

    And I have plenty of primers so about the only ammo I buy in the store is .22 lr.

    Yes it cuts cost and I can pump out 30 to 50 rounds in 15 min and go back to watching TV. By the end of the week I have over 100+ rounds of whatever handgun ammo I wanted to shoot. Same for rifle.

    See the shortage has not hurt me. I don't waste ammo when I practice but I do practice well and often.

    Deaf
     
  5. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    Any "round" can be shot out of a "handgun". what are you talking about or are you just bragging in some fashion?
     
  6. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    If you cast, bullets are significantly less. I used to get free lead, but must buy it now as I don't belong to that gun club anymore, moved. 2.7 grains Bulsseye per shot (wadcutter loads) goes a LONG way. Brass, well, I've been using the same .38 brass for over 30 years, never seems to wear out with .38 pressures. Nickeled will crack after some time, but standard brass seems to hold up forever.

    Others have hit on other reasons. I like always having the optimum load for my weapons that my weapons are sighted in for and that hit POA in those guns. I make loads that I cannot buy, too, specialty loads for certain guns like a .357 magnum load with Lil' Gun that equals Buffalo Bore that costs a HELL of a lot more than my reloads. I also have a light .38 load, 105 cast SWC from a lee mold over 2.3 grains Bullseye that clocks 900 fps out of my 20" lever action carbine and mimics .22 rimfire pretty well. It shoots 1.5" at 50 yards and allows me to take squirrel to that range. I plink with that one a lot since I haven't been able to buy .22LR for a while.

    And, yeah, it's fun. :D
     
  7. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    I use those 105's out of a 9 and they hit harder than a .22 rimfire, that's for sure.
     
  8. Lost Sheep

    Lost Sheep Member

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    If all you shoot in handgun ammunition is 9mm, yes, you probably do not save any money. But my friend shoots 500 Smith and saves 75%. And his ammo is probably better quality than the $3.00 each retail priced stuff.

    My 454 Casull and 45 Colt is considerably less costly than store-bought ammo, too.

    On the other hand, a few years ago I bought a BUNCH of 45 ACP (UMC label from Wal-Mart) when it was on sale for LESS than I could have bought brass, bullets, primers and powder. Go figure. I bought all I could afford. Not hoarding, just bargain-hunting. I sure am glad I did. But I digress.

    Your post SEEMED dismissive of handgun cartridge loaders. (Post 55). I am sure it was not intended to be.

    Thanks for contributing.

    Lost Sheep
     
  9. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I'm loading 1k .38 specials for around $55 and that's at todays component prices and $40 a bucket for wheel weights.
    You don't count brass. With standard loads in .38 special it lasts nearly forever. I read about a test a gunwriter conducted where he loaded the same piece of brass until it split. It split on the 158th loading. Now I don't reckon it will all last that long, but that's downright impressive.

    I don't load .44 mag but I do load .45 Colt and it will cost about the same. The .44 may cost a touch more due to increased powder charge, but not much. I'm loading 1k rounds for about $60-$65. That's with my own cast bullets.
     
  10. Lost Sheep

    Lost Sheep Member

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    I imagine it is.

    Think of the excitement and enjoyment those guys who fire groups at 1,000 yards that you measure with calipers, one round every five minutes (sometimes reloading at the shooting bench and using the same casing for the group). Yah. Exciting. Not the kind that makes you whoop, "Wahoo!" necessarily, but deeply satisfying nonetheless (if you are of that temperament).

    Each to their own.

    Lost Sheep

    p.s. Curling is sometimes called "Chess on Ice" and I have wondered why anyone would enjoy such a slow-moving sport, until I looked into it. It is strategic, dynamic, and no less demanding than billiards (which I do enjoy). Don't knock it.

    p.p.s. If you HAD to be on a curling team, would you rather be a thrower or a sweeper? After you answer, research the game. You may be surprised. I was.
     
  11. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    $7-$8 per 50rds with commercial cast bullets.
     
  12. Fishslayer

    Fishslayer Member

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    Why not? I load my 9mm and .45ACP for about half the cost (or better, figuring current prices) of factory ammo. Better still, I HAVE ammo right now. Wife & I went to the range today & burned about a hunnert rounds each. No drama. Plenty more where that came from. ;)

    And I can load up powderpuff .45 for the wife. She loves her some 1911 goodness but can't really do much recoil.
     
  13. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    I *have* ammo. People that don't reload, unless they stockpiled, don't. Those who stockpiled factory ammo spent more than I did/do.

    Getting primers is a challenge right now, but I already have some.

    Hunting rifle rounds cost me about .25-.30/ea, vs. $1+/ea. Pistol rounds are much less, too. I don't actually spend less money than I otherwise would, though. I just get to shoot more, and more often, and can afford to feed more of my guns than I otherwise would be able to do.
     
  14. 35 Whelen

    35 Whelen Member

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    Last time I saw .35 Spec in Walmart it was $17 or $18 per 50 for the 158 gr. RN lead. I load the same load with cast bullets for under $2 per box of 50. If I had to buy lead bullets, it'd probably add $5 or so to a box of 50 (just guessing)

    35W
     
  15. Driftwood Johnson

    Driftwood Johnson Member

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    Howdy

    Try loading your handgun rounds with Black Powder sometime and you will quickly see that it is worth your time.
     
  16. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    No offense intended and I'm sorry if I said anything to upset anyone. When I do the math there is not enough savings to justify the time involved in reloading for the handgun rounds I shoot. For one thing, I simply don't shoot as much handgun ammo as rifle ammo.

    That is not the case with rifle ammo. I save enough money to justify the time involved. The greatest advantage for me is being able to not only load a much more accurate round, but be able to get a little more veloctiy from the loads. Even if I were not saving money it would be worth the time.

    I can buy FMJ 9mm in bulk pretty cheap and it does what I want it to do. Seveal years ago I ran across a lifetime supply of Hornady 124GR+p dirt cheap. I will never live long enough to shoot it and have no need to load premium bullets.

    Not many black powder loads in 9mm or 45 ACP.
     
  17. kimbershot

    kimbershot Member

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    why reload--cause i can

    45 acp!

    free brass, free lead and i cast my own bullets, primers 3.5cents, powder--penny? lgs--selling boxes of 45's at 25.00 :eek:

    right now i can shoot my 45' cheaper than you can shoot a 22--if you can find 22 ammo.

    (ps--still have about 8k of 22 bulk at 13/pack :D)

    (pps-got the time-retired :))
     
  18. mljdeckard

    mljdeckard Member

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    I spend most of the time required while I watch TV. I can size, de-cap, bell, and prime while I watch TV on my Lee hand press.

    And I for one, am endlessly fascinated by the process.
     
  19. 1911Tuner

    1911Tuner Moderator Emeritus

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    It largely depends on how you reload and whether you insist on high-end jacketed bullets or you can be happy with home cast or commercially cast bullets. And don't believe that hype about not being able to drive cast bullets to full magnum velocities. It can be done without leading...but you usually have to pour your own, because commercial cast bullets are often a little too hard.

    The biggest advantage to reloading is the ability to make your ammunition when shortages occur. As long as you've got primers and powder in stock...and lead and a means to melt it...you've got ammo when other people are hurting.
     
  20. Gtscotty

    Gtscotty Member

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    Even not getting especially great deals on my components, and not buying anything but bullets in bulk, I can still load mid range (240gr lead @ 1100 fps) .44 Mag for $11.70 a box. When I start buying primers and powder in bulk, that price will go down significantly.

    The financial benefit of reloading doesn't really come into play with some of the most common rounds like 9mm... that's why I don't even bother loading them. If, however, you want to shoot some of the more exotic rounds like .44 Mag, 10mm, .454 Casull, etc. and dont have piles of excess money laying around your house, you pretty much have to reload to spend any decent amount of time at the range. The advantage only increases from there when you start looking at pretty much any full power rifle round that's not .308 or .223.

    Even beyond the cost savings, one of the most interesting things about reloading is it lets you tailor loads to your specific rifle. A lot of folks have rifles that are sub MOA with their hand loads, that aren't terribly close to MOA with most factory loads.
     
  21. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf member

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    I think we reload even the "lowly" 9mm so we can shoot. It's about impossible to find in stores etc. at any price, same with .22's. It's also nice to shoot them for like $30 or so per thousand.
     
  22. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    If I had that mindset, I wouldn't load at all. Handloading is every bit as much a hobby for me as shooting is. I ENJOY it. I don't calculate my time when I want to play golf, watch football or go fishing, so why would I with handloading?

    I always get a laugh when people say you have to take your time into consideration when participating in a hobby. That's like saying, "Well, I would go hiking today, but my time is worth something, so I'll just sit here on the couch."
     
  23. jim243

    jim243 Member

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    Because I am still going to the range and shooting and you are not.

    Jim
     
  24. palmetto99

    palmetto99 Member

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    I just kind of enjoy the time spent in the shop with some music on and no one bothering me.

    Plus, as someone stated before, if you want something other than 130 grn fmj plinking rounds, reloading is the way to go. I can imagine that if one were reloading .44 spl or .45 colt other than .38 spl, $$ can be saved.

    BTW, I have seen more split revolver brass than auto. Maybe it's just me.
     
  25. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

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    My father and I competed shooting ATA trap years ago. We were shooting 600 12ga /wk.
    Our reloads performed as well as new shells and was a bunch cheaper. It was a ritual to reload those hulls during the week to be ready for the wknd.
    I find reloading enjoyable, almost as much as shooting lol.
     
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