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Why no love for the SR9?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by marb4, Sep 21, 2012.

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  1. Bozwell

    Bozwell Member

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    I don't think the differences in weight are as great as you're letting on mustard.

    In a vain effort to get this thread back on track before it's locked... I suspect one challenge Ruger really faces here is overcoming that initial impression a lot of people (including myself) got of this gun due to the really poor triggers they had early on. The other challenge is the wide array of quality pistols they compete with in roughly the same price range.
     
  2. meanmrmustard

    meanmrmustard Member

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    Maybe not to you, but to me it is. As for guns in its range; if I want a heavily built range gun, there's better than the SR9. Carry? Many better, many as cheap if not cheaper.

    I'll leave it be, so you guys can keep on with it. These are the reasons I've no love for the SR9. Take them, leave them. Doesn't matter, because they're important to me.
     
  3. Bozwell

    Bozwell Member

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    I'm pretty sure this major "weight" issue is in your head. Weigh your food sometime, the change in your pocket, or even the fluctuations in your body weight on a daily basis, then come tell me you can notice 2 oz's or whatever the delta is. Frankly, I don't buy it, unless you just have a really lousy carry rig.

    I can't really think of many cheaper carry guns than a SR9c. If $400 is your budget, I can't really see it being a bad choice. Glock, M&P, CZ, XDm compacts are all going to cost around $100 or more. I have no problem enjoying myself with a compact at the range.

    The SR9 series is not my personal choice for a firearm, but the reasons you're listing for hating it are pretty silly.
     
  4. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    Ditto!!
    It's funny that 4oz is a half pound and makes just a huge difference, But a 3oz magazine matters not. I guess if you carry a gun without a mag.
    [​IMG]
    Mr Mustard do you carry 115gr 9mms cause I'm thinking 124s would probably make the gun too heavy to carry?
     
  5. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    I'm still stumped by all the Block fanboys who think a Block factory trigger is good.
     
  6. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    4 oz. is a QUARTER of a pound, not half a pound...

    Unless you're wearing duty gear (which is heavy in it's own right), the weight of any gun seems to get heavier as the day wears on... and an extra 5-6 ounces becomes noticeable. That said, as noted, nobody complains about the weight of a fully-loaded magazine, and a spare that might be carried.
     
  7. atblis

    atblis Member

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    Have you never felt the first SR9 triggers? Gave the Sigma a run for the money.
     
  8. CZ9shooter

    CZ9shooter Member

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    I have no complaints about the trigger on my SR9. Earlier models however, the ones without the trigger blade saftey and having the round mag release button instead of the new D shape, I cannot speak for. But it sounds like they were not very good. Ruger redesigned some parts of the trigger and the newer ones are quite nice.
     
  9. exavid

    exavid Member

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    A couple of years ago I bought an SR9, the first plastic pistol I've owned. I didn't like the trigger at first but loved the way the gun handled and fit my hand. I installed a Rocket trigger bar, it took an hour or so since it needed to be hand honed for best fit. That made the difference the pistol's rough trigger was gone and the new bar made for a clean and smooth trigger. I later traded the gun for an LC9 which I use as one of my main carry guns. Before the SR9 trade in I bought an SR40c which filled the need that my 9mm served but with a good bit more oomph. I really like the .40. I though the compact would be rough to handle but found out that it's perfectly comfortable and controllable even with the short 10 round magazine and the flat floorplate. I do think the SR series from Ruger are fine guns at a bargain price. There were some early issues with the SR but those have been taken care of. If you're looking for a full sized 9mm or .40 it's hard to beat. The compact models are great too!
     
  10. Ryan in the House

    Ryan in the House Member

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    I'm quite happy that I stumbled across this thread. I've been away from THR since 2005, and I've returned because I think I'm ready to make my first handgun purchase. I came here looking for advice, hoping to find some information on the SR9c, which I consider to be a leading candidate for my first handgun purchase. It's reassuring to know that the Ruger receives a lot of sincere praise from this forum!

    I'm wondering if you "third generation" SR9 and SR9c owners will be able to address an issue with the Ruger that some people on the Internet are reporting--it involves the SR9 or SR9c failing to eject spent cartridges. Is there any truth to this? Some people have claimed that a quick polishing of the feed ramp will solve the problem, and some say that the problem is with the extractor. I've also heard that the ammunition has been at fault. Has anyone experienced any feed or ejection problems with the SR9 or SR9c? Should this make me reconsider the SR9c as a first-time handgun? Keep in mind that I'm a new buyer and shooter. While I'm confident that I can learn to field strip the handgun, I may be bewildered if the solution for a failing extractor is too complicated for a rookie. Sending it back to Ruger--well, that's a nice option, but I wouldn't want that to become the routine protocol for every problem that I might encounter. Do you believe a simpler handgun--maybe a fixed-barrel model like a Bersa Thunder 380 or CZ-83--would be a better choice? I like a more compact gun, although I prefer my handgun to have more heft than an LCP or mini Kel-Tec. It'll be a range gun, primarily, but I do want to keep the door open for concealed carry in the future.
     
  11. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

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    Personally, this is one issue about the SR9 I've never heard. In over 1,000 rounds I (my daughter, actually) experienced a stovepipe... but her wrists were limp as a wet noodle. A lot of autos will give you cycling issues without a firm grip. Some won't.

    Also as with a lot of guns, your choice of firearm may be fussy with specific ammo types. Mine isn't fond of mil spec stuff (hard primers were the problem...when they did go "boom, cycling never was an issue). It has reliably digested and spit out every other fodder it was fed.
     
  12. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    Extraction problems are almost always either due to limp wristing, a weak/failed extractor, or bad ammo -- the last being more rare. If you're a newbie, and aren't sure whether you can do some repair yourself, you shouldn't hesitate to send a gun back to the manufacturer.

    I bought an earlier used SR9, and had the trigger upgraded with the Ghost trigger bar. New models since my purchase have much improved triggers. The gun is reliable, accurate, and in all ways a good handgun. The older gun with the enhanced trigger is quite nice (crisp); the newer guns seem just about as good.

    Just because the gun is smaller or uses a smaller caliber doesn't mean it's simpler or easier to shoot well.

    And, better in what way? If the gun isn't going to be used for concealed carry -- one of the main justifications for a smaller size -- then go for a bigger gun. A slightly larger, heavier gun will be more pleasant to shoot. Larger models also typically have larger grips, which improves comfort while firing.

    The two .380 guns you mention are fine weapons, but .380 ammo is typically more expensive than 9mm (which is what the SR9 or SR9C shoots), and generally a less powerful/effective round. Most of the smaller .380s are not as pleasant guns to shoot as most 9mms. There are exceptions.

    If this is your first handgun purchase, expect some problems -- regardless of the gun maker -- as handguns are different than long guns and require different techniques. Some range time will sort it all out. Shoot a lot. And, if you can find someone locally who comes well-recommended, get some personal instruction -- it'll save you time and MONEY over the longer term.
     
  13. Ryan in the House

    Ryan in the House Member

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    Thanks for your response. "Better," of course, is a subjective term; I'd never press you or anyone else to tell me what gun is the "best" on the market because I'd be swallowed up by the amount of information that is returned to me. Rather, I wanted to know whether the SR9c is ideal for a new shooter. And judging by the language of your post, there is nothing that disqualifies the SR9c from being a fine choice for a new shooter like myself. That's good! And thanks for clarifying the ejection problem. I do understand that not every gun leaves the factory in perfect working order, and some specimens turn out to be prone to failure. One "problem gun" out of a thousand doesn't reflect the quality of the gun design, but if enough people report the same problem, then I have an obligation to myself as a new buyer to take notice. :) I'm prepared to deal with some issues here and there. My question is, How does one return a defective handgun to the manufacturer? Is it as simple as mailing it via UPS, or do I need to send it though an FFL? Forgive me if this is a silly question!

    Your advice about the cost of .380 ACP is well-noted, and I had taken it into consideration. I have experience firing the Bersa Thunder 380, and for what it's worth, the gun really feels great in my hand--hammer-bite was nonexistent and recoil was very manageable. So, if I like the feel and comfort of one gun over another, I don't think I'll let the round type drive me away in most circumstances. As you said, smaller guns have a tendency to be less comfortable to shoot because there is less material to grip. Good point. The CZ-83 has a thick grip, so I'm sure I'd find it very comfortable. The Bersa felt nice, too, and I don't need to probe the SR9c too much in that area because it does come with grip extensions for the magazines. I would be concerned about the LCP or mini Kel-Tecs, and while I'd like to stay within the compact region--I'm hoping to keep the door open as a tool for personal defense or concealed carry further down the road--I don't want to buy something too small to handle. Of course, I'll figure that out before I make the purchase. Thanks for sharing your wisdom, Walt! I welcome any more words of advice.
     
  14. carbonyl

    carbonyl Member

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    That's the spirit. NEVER forget, Never forgive. Once a mistake's been made there's no second chances. They should have been shutdown.:rolleyes:
     
  15. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

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    Exactly. Witness the issues experienced with Gen 4 Glocks. As any good gun mfr should, Glock addressed those issues.

    But that's Glock, and their "ship" doesn't sail so quickly.
     
  16. Shipwreck

    Shipwreck Member

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    I've shot the SR9 a couple of times. I just didn't really care for the gun. Its not a bad gun - just not for me.
     
  17. rbernie
    • Contributing Member

    rbernie Member

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    I've shot 'em a bunch (10K plus rounds, likely) and own more than a few. In their current form, they're my favorite striker fired pistol.
     
  18. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    I added the underlining, above.

    A non-FFL can't use the US mails to ship handguns, and there must be an FFL on both ends of the transaction. Many gun makers will send you a UPS or FedEx shipping label so that the gun maker pays the freight. Some don't.

    As an individual, you can ship directly to an FFL or gunmaker through FedEx or UPS. It's expensive because the shippers require you touse their premium AIR service. (I wanted to ship a SIG to Gray Guns in Washington State from NC earlier this year, and the one-way charge would have been $100. I decided to not get the work done, as it wasn't a repair.)

    If you buy your weapon from a local dealer, you can ask the dealer to ship it back for you. Your dealer can use the US Mails much less expensively than shipping via FedEx or UPS. Even after a long time has passed, and the dealer asks you to pay a transfer fee, it'll still cost less.

    As to your other questions:

    Offhand, I'd say that no "compact" gun is ideal for a new shooter -- but that doesn't mean I'm advocating crew-served handguns. You'd probably shoot a Beretta 92 better than a compact Glock, for example.

    Within reason, a bigger and heavier gun works better, because small guns seem to amplify problems in technique for new shooters, such that mastering the basics takes longer.

    If you MUST have a compact, the Bersa you mentioned, the CZ-83, or the SR9c are all fine weapons.

    I WOULD let the cost of ammo figure in the decision -- as proficiency comes with a lot of practice. But cost isn't the only concern: with .380 ammo just finding .380 can be problematic locally -- and premium (hollow-point) self-defense ammo is very hard to find, even on the internet. There's a lot fewer options for .380s, and they all cost more.

    I've had several small .380 pistols (3PAT and LCP) and a 9mm Makarov CZ-82 (virtually identical to the CZ-83.) Finding ammo locally can be a real challenge.
     
  19. Mike J

    Mike J Member

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    I have not had a problem with the one Ruger handgun (of course it is an old P series gun & I have only had it for 12 years)I own but they do have a reputation for good customer service. If you do have a problem with a new gun when you contact them ask for a shipping label. I have seen many people post that Ruger sent them shipping labels so that they could send in a new gun with problems. Besides the worst that can happen is they say no.
     
  20. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    I've been looking at getting a Block 19. My buddy has a 23 that he had a master armorer do a trigger job on. The trigger is really sweet, for a Glock.
    I was trying out pistols today; Glock 19, S&W M&P9, Springfield XD9, Ruger SR9 and the S&W Sigma (whatever it's called now).
    The XD had the best trigger of them all, and feels great in my hand.
    The M&P had a good trigger and feels the best in my hand.
    The SR9 had a good trigger, though a little gritty, and felt great in my hand.
    The Glock19 had the worst trigger, not a surprise, which felt like every Glock factory trigger I've ever tried. The Glock also didn't feel great in my hand. The stupid finger grooves don't fit my fingers.

    The XD factory trigger feels better than my buddy's Glock trigger after he had the trigger job.

    I'm going to buy an SR9 or and XD9.
    I like the low bore centerline of the Ruger. Other than that, it's a toss up between it and the XD.
    There's no way I'd pay Glock's prices for a new gun. The SR9 costs the same, new, as the Popo trade in Glocks. $399.00
    The XD is $439.00
    The M&P is $489.00.
    They're all very reliable pistols, but I'm not crazy about the design of the M&P trigger. If the thin strip of plastic at the front of the trigger safety pivot pin hole cracks, you have an unusable gun. That's the ONLY thing I don't like about the Smith.
     
  21. Ryan in the House

    Ryan in the House Member

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    Once again, Walt, that's very sound advice, and I thank you for being patient with me. Numerous people have told me that .380 ACP is a very impractical round for new shooters. So, I began considering the Ruger SR9c because it offered the advantages of the 9x19 Parabellum casing within a smaller body. The SR9c accommodates a grip extension on the 17-round magazine--I live in Maryland, where we're allowed to have up to 20 rounds in our magazines--so it's possible that I can reap some of the benefits of a full-frame gun with that configuration. My position is that it'd be nice to have versatility at my fingertips.

    I hate to distract from the purpose of this thread--I'll gladly move this topic elsewhere if you'd prefer--but while we're here, would you suggest any other handguns in 9x19 Parabellum for a first-time shooter? One that perhaps comes in a compact or smaller frame, like the SR9c or Glock 19? I don't anticipate that I'll want to spend anything above $600, but I'm open to your recommendations.

    I certainly hope Ruger wouldn't deny a warranty claim if the failure came from their end. :eek: I've heard that Ruger has exceptional customer service, though, and I'm confident that they would address any type of factory defect. I'm not an expert, but it'd seem to me that a gun manufacturer would need to maintain some sort of reputation for quality in order to stay in business. I don't imagine that anyone would buy a defense handgun that cannot be trusted to shoot when it's needed to, and judging by the number of people at this forum who trust the SR9c as a carry pistol, it must have some degree of reliability in construction or it'd never pass inspection as a carry weapon.
     
  22. Walt Sherrill

    Walt Sherrill Member

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    Why not start a new topic -- "What reasonably-priced 9mm semi-auto would be good for a new shooter?" -- and leave this one to the SR9.

    Personally, I think the SR9 does everything the Glock 19 does, and does it better. The one thing the Glock does better than the SR9, is that it functions with far fewer parts. (I think there are almost as many parts in the SR9 trigger/striker assembly as in the entire Glock handgun.)

    Please understand: I like Glocks -- I have a Glock 35 and 38, and have had two 17s, and a 34. All of them were/are good guns.
     
  23. mavracer

    mavracer Member

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    Ruger CS is great. I've only had to deal with them twice out of over 30 Rugers one a used Super Blackhawk that broke the transfer bar. Called them they asked for serial # took my info and it was in my mail box 3 days later the other was a Sheriff's vaquero that shot low. Called they sent a call tag less than 2 weeks it's back with a taller front sight. I just bought my SR9 I love it.
     
  24. carbonyl

    carbonyl Member

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I have a P95 and SR9c. Both have been flawless with over 3000 rounds apiece. The first time I took the SR9c apart I was having a problem getting the striker cover far enough into the slide to engage the plunger. I found a small piece of the cover in the slide. Once removed the cover slid into place. With the 95 I had a small nick on the edge of the feed ramp. Neither caused any problems with the function of the guns but when I mentioned them to Ruger CS they mailed me a new striker cover for the SR9c (now I have two) and a shipping label for the 95 (they replaced barrel). There was no cost to me for either of these non-issues and both were resolved in less than two weeks. If their customer service is your concern then put your mind at ease, they will do what it takes to make you a satisfied customer. :D
     
  25. Mike J

    Mike J Member

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    I was not meaning they would not repair the weapon. I was just saying you should call them & ask for a shipping label. Most people I have seen post about this said like mavracer has posted they will send you a shipping label so it doesn't cost you anything to send a new gun to them if you ask them to.
     
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