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Why people love S&W revolvers

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by TarDevil, Feb 18, 2012.

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  1. hardluk1

    hardluk1 member

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    I love wessons just not the smiths.
     
  2. tahoe2

    tahoe2 Member

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    smiths = great triggers

    I have an S&W Mtn Gun model 57-5 in .41 magnum(4"), I also have a Ruger SA Blackhawk in .41 magnum(4-5/8"). The ruger has a really good trigger, but the smith has a great trigger. I did shoot a Colt Anaconda once(nice), but without a side by side comparison, I can't say it's the same, or better, or worse. for what it's worth.
     
  3. just for fun

    just for fun Member

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    In the event that you must ask. It becomes obvious you do not own one! It also would be a rare situation when anyone, who clams to be "into" handguns would only own one Smith&Wesson revolver.
     
  4. Fishslayer

    Fishslayer Member

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    Two things every person should own. A 1911 in .45ACP and a .357 Magnum wheelgun.
     
  5. Keizer

    Keizer Member

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    Or two or three of each...:D

    I have only owned S&W revolvers for the last 25 years. Recently I bought a Ruger GP 100 in stainless steel. Although the Ruger is a great gun, the details (fit and finish) that you find on a S&W just aren't there with the Ruger. Matter of fact, the bottom of the hammer on the Ruger is ridiculously home made looking. I worked as a journey level machinist for years, so these differences stand out for me. But, I do have to say that I like the look of the Ruger overall, and it's one of my fav revolvers.
     
  6. Serenity

    Serenity Member

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    Hey now, some of us only own a couple of guns. But one of them does happen to be a m67 :) My son loves it so much he spent hours today after school perusing the S&W website looking at hundreds of models and daydreaming. :cool: It is amazing what kids can come up with to avoid homework.
     
  7. Dnaltrop

    Dnaltrop Member

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    Because the Second pistol I was allowed to shoot after the High Standard .22...

    My very first revolver... was a late 30's, early 40's Victory Model 10 .38.

    Every trigger I've pulled since has had a very high bar to clear.
     
  8. PabloJ

    PabloJ Member

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    I put that revolver on layaway. Not sure if inserts are .22lr or .22wrm but I like four screw frame and 4" heavy barrel. If the barrel was long I would pass on the gun.
     
  9. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I like S&W revolvers because they are so damn sexy!
     
  10. evan price

    evan price Member

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    Like both Colt & S&W. Both have advantages. Both have appeal. It's just the hand craftsmanship and the old-school look. Plus they tend to always go bang and hit what I point at. Tactical Tupperware has no appeal to me. They are a toaster.
     
  11. Retcop

    Retcop Member

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    I Own 6 S&W revolvers so I guess I am hooked on them. :eek:
     
  12. sloman

    sloman Member

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    the trigger says it all
     
  13. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

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    Me thinks most missed the light-hearted intent of the initial post.. but whatever stimulates a good conversation, right? :)

    Nope... don't own a S&W revolver yet. The one I want = one mortgage payment, and I've got too many doctors wanting a heap more money than I've got!
     
  14. Dnaltrop

    Dnaltrop Member

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    Love spawns a deeper interest Tar :D

    The Model 10 has been made since 1899, I've got a Chief's special in the "library", the first Cowboy revolver I bought was a Replica... of a S&W Schofield. The first Polymers were S&W...

    I keep having the wrong amount of money in my account when I find a lower-priced "Registered Magnum" (sigh)

    Never even managed to lay eyes on a live Volcanic, much less consider owning one.

    All of this UTTERLY unintentional, and purely on how they felt in hand, or fit a purpose, or tickled my fancy. NOT by brand name alone.

    People don't usually memorize all of the back story on a gun that makes them go "meh" :D

    S&W (and other venerable manufacturers) are living history. I can't recite serial numbers, but I'm sure glad that guys who can are on THR!

    That a little more "in spirit" for ya neighbor? ^^

    BTW I can't afford my dream Smith at the moment either, but those $280 Model 10's from Bud's might slake some of your thirst in the interim.
     
  15. TarDevil

    TarDevil Member

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    That might keep me pacified 'till I can afford my Classic... Model 22 (Thunder Ranch, preferably), 24 or 25. I'm not ENTIRELY picky! :)
     
  16. Bubba613

    Bubba613 member

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    The S&W revolver is a classic. The basic gun is over 100 years old and it was all over the place when police issued them.
    Colt? Well, the Smith is still in production, the Colt isn't. That pretty much says it. The Colts were terribly expensive, due to the extensive hand fitting required. The metal was soft. They went out of time frequently. And the triggers weren't anywhere near as good as a Smith that had been tuned.

    A person who says this doesn't know what he's talking about. Today's Smiths are better made than the old ones. The metal is better and the production is better. I have a new 649 in my shop with a trigger, both DA and SA, that would have taken a gunsmith quite a bit of work to achieve. Many of the older guns, especially the Js, had terrible rough triggers.
     
  17. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    Well,in my own PERSONAL experience (having owned many revolvers over the last 4 decades)I would rate the S&W triggers as good but not that far superior to many others. I did a closed eye test of triggers between a Smith Model 29-2 and a Taurus M44. They both had identical rubber grips. It was virtually impossible to tell them apart by feel.
     
  18. Jim NE

    Jim NE Member

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    To me it's the history, in part. I like things made in America from the 1930's to the 1970's.

    Also, it seems like there are more old Smiths that work than don't work. Good indication of quality.
     
  19. cfullgraf

    cfullgraf Member

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    But, with revolvers you do not leave any more evidence than necessary behind.

    I like my S&Ws.

    Wish I had some Colts to like but all of my Colts go back and forth not roundy round.
     
  20. Bush Pilot

    Bush Pilot Member

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    Posts like this prove that friends shouldn't let friends post while they're drunk.
     
  21. il_10

    il_10 Member

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    Likely because Colt makes way more money off of the big, easy to fill government contracts.
    Truer more in recent years than in Colt's heyday. The cost of hand fitting went up, and colt tried to adapt by switching to coil springs and parts that drop in easier. The following guns admittedly weren't very popular, which certainly contributed to Colt's decision to pull out of the DA revolver market.
    The timing issue has been debated to death on this forum and others, and I don't want to jump into that here. I'm curious, though, where you got the idea that the metal is soft compared to a Smith? I've always been under the impression that Colt's metallurgy was superior to Smith's. When Smith built the .38-44 outdoorsman because the .38-44HV was beating their M&Ps apart, colt claimed the ammo was fine in their D frame guns. I'm sure plenty of this was just corporate competition, but the D frame is only slightly larger than a Smith J frame so...
    I'd just like to see that backed up with a rockwell test or something other than hearsay one way or the other before being claimed. You may very well be right, I've just never heard that before (but rather the contrary)

    A Smith trigger isn't anywhere near as good as a trigger that has been tuned...

    I prefer a Colt trigger to a Smith. And I love my Smith long-action triggers too but in SA a Colt's hard to compete with, and the DA is at least on par with the others.
     
  22. Bubba613

    Bubba613 member

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    Gov't contracts typically do not make much money. Every arms contractor has experienced the low margins that come from gov't work. I believe Remington went broke supplying the army, maybe after the Spanish AMerican war.
    No, Colt's revolvers were not competitive. The Python sold for about $900 in the last years of production and the Smith 686 for about 550.
    As to the metal, this info is from my 'smith, a Colt's registered gunsmith. Re-timing involves beating on the cylinder to bend the metal.
    Smith's pre-war long double action pretty much was an afterthought, as single action shooting was preferred. The post war short action made for a beautiful DA, which has only gotten better with better materials and techniques.
     
  23. il_10

    il_10 Member

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    You're partially correct. Re-timing a colt that has a sprung crane can often involve beating on the crane (not the cylinder), but most often re-timing involves only refitting a hand, as that was the part designed to wear first. Shooting a colt that's out of time for a lengthy period of time will wear other parts, and slapping the cylinder into battery can spring the frame, but both of these problems are present in a S&W as well. Neither of these issues speaks to the softness of the metal, which to my knowledge is generally considered to have been consistently better than S&W. For the record, I own several of both. I'll check around and see if anyone has the tools available near me to test the hardness for comparison on some hidden-away spot.
     
  24. sgtstryker

    sgtstryker Member

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    If I may, is $495 a fair price on a Model 10-4 heavy barrel 4 in. ? It's in very good condition. I've been wanting this gun for about two months, I have bought my wife a 10-6 standard 4 in. for $335 out the door. Two different shops.
     
  25. JeffDilla

    JeffDilla Member

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    Haha! Perfect!
     
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