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Why the high cost for 9X25 dillon dies?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by EBRDude, Mar 12, 2008.

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  1. EBRDude

    EBRDude Member

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    Heck. I want to shoot this out of my G20, but the cost of the dies is a bit high. Anyone have a set they want to give me in exchange for lots of respect?
    So, can you use regular 10mm brass and resize it?
    I have loaded a bunch of 357Sig, are there any big differences?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    I have the Dillon 9x25 Dillon dies and they're expensive because #1, they're in a blue box, and #2, because the sizing die is carbide. Any necked carbide die is going to cost an arm and a leg, due to the difficulty in machining the carbide insert.

    The 9x25 Dillon is the 10mm necked down to 9mm. There is a big difference between 357 Sig and 9x25 in the case used and powder capacity. The 357 Sig uses small pistol primers and the 9x25 uses large pistol primers. The velocity of the 9x25 is considerably higher than the 357 Sig.

    You would have to ream a 9mm or .38 Super barrel with a 9x25 chamber reamer, or find someone who makes a barrel in that caliber. I don't know who makes Glock barrels in wildcat calibers, since I don't own one.

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  3. EBRDude

    EBRDude Member

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    Thanks Fred, The barrel is no problem. Lone Wolf makes a few in different lengths and such. I already have one in 10mm to replace the stock barrel so I can shoot warm reloads. Thanks for the info.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2008
  4. DILLONHELP

    DILLONHELP Member

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    We found that new brass easily forms in the size die. Using fired brass, unless annealed first, gives greater case loss during the forming process.
    High cost is the size die requires two pieces of carbide, one for the neck and shoulder, the other for the case body.
     
  5. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    DILLONHELP,

    I got all my information on this round from Jay Phillips, plus the first set of dies in this caliber. He sent me most of his notes in developing the round, which I've found most helpful. He's back working for Berry's now.

    Fred
     
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