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Will shooting oxidized lead ammo hurt my gun?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by LiquidTension, Jul 31, 2005.

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  1. LiquidTension

    LiquidTension Member

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    Just curious. My dad found some old .22 ammo out in the garage. Lots of it has begun to oxidize. Should I just toss it, or is it ok to shoot it? I think shooting it would be a better way to dispose of it than anything else, but not if it's going to damage my firearms.
     
  2. TMM

    TMM Member

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    i think it's fine. if you still feel uneasy, clean the gun after you shoot. (i heard some people don't clean thier .22's as often as other [larger] calibers.)

    ~TMM
     
  3. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Member

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    Accuracy may suffer and you will probably get more than your normal share of malfunctions, but it shouldn't be dangerous to you or the firearm. Assuming the firearm is in good condition.

    I'd throw away any of the rounds that look like the case might be compromised.
     
  4. RevDisk

    RevDisk Member

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    Yes, it will. They need to be disposed of very carefully. Let me PM you my address... :D


    :neener:


    Na, seriously, should be fine. If you're concerned, dump them. .22 ammo is cheap, and not worth worrying about if the ammo looks suspect.
     
  5. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    Some will shoot it and some won't. I won't shoot powdery lead bullets as long as I can afford something better.

    Here's a post I saved from BenchrestCentral:

    Lead Oxide Pb3O4, the white stuff on you car battery thermals
    Melting point 800 degs. F
    Hardness: 4-5 mohs hardness scale

    Aluminum Oxide Al7O3, abrasive
    Melting point 2073 degs. F
    Hardness: 9 mohs hardness scale

    The difference is in the crystal lattice structure and the upset along the shear plans within the lattice structure. Aluminum oxide as a hexagonal structure, lead oxide has blocky crystals terminated by a blunt four sided or complex pyramid!

    Now YOU know!

    Will
     
  6. 45crittergitter

    45crittergitter Member

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    Uhm, whut's a battery thermal??? :rolleyes:
     
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