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Willing to admit a reloading...

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by j2crows, Apr 8, 2011.

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  1. j2crows

    j2crows Member

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    Mistake. Back in 1969 I was getting into reloading. I took my first reloaded rounds out to the gun range to see if they would go, "bang". The first 2 shots fired just fine. On the 3rd round I felt it kicked kinda hard and instantly felt something hot on my face. I brushed my face and saw some small flecks of brass on my fingers!!! I tried the bolt and it wouldn't budge! Then I looked through the scope, (Redfield-Widefield duplex) and both horizontal crosshairs were hanging down! That night our local gunsmith took a mallet to the bolt handle and thumped it until it came loose. Then he took a small hammer and beat the case off the bolt. To this day I don't know what happened. Some guys thought, "double-load" but, you can't get the much 4320 in a .270 case. I still count my blessing everytime I look at the case.
     

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    Last edited: Apr 8, 2011
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    That is some serious over pressure.
     
  3. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    That sounds all too familar. I have a friend in Alamogordo who had the same thing happen with his reloads, in fact his first run with .270. The only difference was his accident happened in the mid 1990s. His mistake was an extreme over charge. I worked at the local gun store and he came in and bought everything needed to do it right, but refused my offer as his friend to help him get started, foolish pride. His mistake was he didn't read the Speer manual he bought, and assumed he could safely load a compressed charge with any powder listed. His beautiful Weatherby was totally destroyed, and the top of the line Leupold on it. Fortunately he wasn't seriously injured and only suffered facial bruising, powder burns, and some minor cuts.
    This though, is what happens when someone skims through the pages. He tried to blame me. His reasoning in this was, after asking me what I was loading for .270 win. I stated a compressed charge of slow burning powder, I don't recall which powder that was.
    But in your circumstance it was not identified as to what caused your major malfunction. I do recall my first loads for the .270 win. ended with some blown primers and some split and separated cases. My mistake, I wasn't using a scale to check my powder charge. I bought a Lee powder scoop kit and didn't think it was necessary to use a scale. I bought a scale the next day and never went back to the use of volmetric measuring devices, that was almost 30 yrs. ago. Although I know some really good devices exist that can be calibrated to a scale weighted charge, I still prefer to weight each and every charge. I haven't ever had a repeat event other than my usual work up signs indicating I'm at max, flat or top hat primers.
     
  4. deadeyedog270

    deadeyedog270 Member

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    wow thank for reminding us all that some times you just never know, some thing like that could happen to any of us we all need to watch what we are doing and Safty First
     
  5. kingmt

    kingmt Member

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    I'll admit one.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Branden967

    Branden967 Member

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    What did it do to the gun? Any pictures?
     
  7. GLOOB

    GLOOB Member

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    The scariest I had was a feed jam I had with my G27. It was the only jam I'd had in the last couple thousand rounds. So I mess with the slide and get the round to chamber. Click. I rack the round out, and the bullet was set back nearly flush with the case mouth.

    At first, I thought it was the luckiest click, ever. First time I ever had a light strike on a reload; what great timing! Then I noticed the cartridge was WIN, with a factory colored brass SPP in it. All my SPP are silver. So at least I wasn't left wondering how it happened.

    When I got home, I tried seating a bullet in a fired, unsized unflared case. It actually had some resistance during seating, not too different from a sized, flared case. Of course, there was no neck tension.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2011
  8. MrWesson

    MrWesson Member

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    I loaded a squib round(no powder) a few months ago. Luckily it wasnt enough to operate the slide(next round wouldnt fit anyway). I noticed it immediately but for awhile tried not to rapid fire.
     
  9. BigN

    BigN Member

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    That sounds like a close call. I've never had anything happen so serious as that but I did have to pull the bullets on 50 223 rounds once. That was tedious enough so I checked things more thoroughly after that. Lyman hammer-type puller...
     
  10. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Years ago I bought some like new reloading equipment out of a trader for a good price. The guy that was selling it said reloading wasn't for him. It seems he loaded a .270 case full of some fast burning pistol powder or another and shot it out of a Remington 700. He said the action held together, but the gun suffered irrepairable damage.
     
  11. psyshack

    psyshack Member

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    I've had a squib.
     
  12. James2

    James2 Member

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    I don't know what it is about 270 loads, but years ago between myself and my sons we had 3 270 rifles. a Ruger, a Remington and a custom rifle on an Enfield action. I wanted to work up a load that we could all shoot in the various rifles without having to keep ammo separate. It turned out to be no easy task. We tried a variety of powders, 4350, 4320, 4831, 4064, 3031, 4064.

    It soon became evident that all the rifles were different. What was fine in one was hot in another. The surprising thing was that even start loads in some of the faster powders went overpressure. In the end we settled on the powder that Jack O' Conner liked for the 270. IMR 4831. We used 55.6 grain with a Hornady spire point 130 gr bullet. None of the rifles showed any signs of overpressure with this load. I will not load the 270 with a powder faster than this one because of what we found in our testing. I haven't crono'd this load, but according to the books it should be in the 2900 FPS range. Serious mule deer medicine.

    You are not the only one I have heard say they have had overpressure probs with the 270 Win and faster powders. I can just suggest starting with IMR 4831 and avoid the hassel.
     
  13. Maj Dad

    Maj Dad Member

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    Asymptotic Learning Curves

    (That's math talk for incredibly steep)

    I have a friend who blew up his .270 Rem 700 with a 308 round for his other rifle, both on bench with ammo laying around. Inattention, inexperience and distractions (shooting in the yard with family all around). Remington replaced the bolt for $150 & he learned well. Another friend inadvertently (I mean, who would do it "advertently"?) loaded a 284 bullet in his 270 & had quite a ka-BOOM (no rifle damage, unexplainedly). In the realm of stupidity I loaded up some GI 7.62x51 for my VZ-24 sporter (nice rifle, gunsmith built). My technique at the time (SSG Hotshot, USA, Ft Bragg) was to start with the max load and work up. When I set them off, they fired fine, if with heavy recoil, but then I had to beat the bolt handle open with a 2x4. Genius that I was, replication seemed to be the way to go; instant replay, same results: light bulb beginning to glow... That's the last time SSG Dumbass did that (1973), and he still looks at his fingers with his eyes with some introspection.
     
  14. Arkansas Paul

    Arkansas Paul Member

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    I don't know how logical this is, but it makes sense in my dim mind. I like to use a powder that has the option of a compressed charge. I never load compressed charges, but at least I know that there's not going to be an overcharge. I know that other factors come into play when talking about pressure, but that takes care of that one. I like IMR 4350 for 165 grain .30-06 loads because of that. 57 grains is a compressed charge. I load 56 and it shoots great in my Vanguard.
     
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