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Winchester 72 Stock

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by Jake in TX, Feb 2, 2013.

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  1. Jake in TX

    Jake in TX Member

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    I have a Winchester 72 in pretty rough condition. There is probably between 30% and 40% bluing left, but no rust. The stock was also quite rough. It had chunks of finish chipped out of it, and some paint spots on it also. I've recently disassembled the stock, and carefully used Formby's Furniture Refinisher and some 0000steel wool to remove the finish and paint spots (yes, they all did come off). I had originally planned to use Birchwood-Casey Tru Oil finish, but had a thought that perhaps Winchester had used boiled linseed oil or some other finish on these rifles. What would have been the original finish?

    Jake in TX
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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  3. Jake in TX

    Jake in TX Member

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    Location:
    Ellis County, TX
    Luckily, the Formby's did not remove much stain, only the old finish. It looks quite brown right now (walnut, perhaps?). I'll look into getting one of those stains you mentioned, then use the TruOil. Thank you very much.

    Jake in TX
     
  4. Kp321

    Kp321 Member

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    IMHO, it is hard to beat Tru-Oil. Might not be as hard as some poly or epoxy finishes but is more easily repaired when it does get scratched. If the final finish is too shiny for your tastes, give it a rub down with Brownells Triple F compound and a coat of paste wax.
     
  5. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    I have used Birchwood Casey for years and IMHO it's hard to beat.
    Sand the stock, finishing up with about 8/0 paper and follow the application
    instructions.
    Don't be afraid to apply the finish with you fingers, especially the last coat or two.
    Sometimes info like the "old world" oil finishes must be taken with a grain(several grains?) of salt.
     
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