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Winchester Mod 67A

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by ExAgoradzo, Mar 15, 2019.

  1. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    7AAA9DE0-E6A7-4DCC-A09E-D28EFF144CCE.jpeg A ‘not gun guy’ told me he had a couple of 22s and a shotgun. I went over there because I had a question about my truck (he is a truck guy). As I came into his garage he was carrying 4 rusted sticks of steel attached to various colored pieces of walnut. I gasped. “I haven’t fired these in 25 years.” No joke!

    As I was more interested at that moment in my truck than those rusted ‘rifles’ we left them stacked at his bench and talked. After a while he had told me they were mine if I wanted them. So I put them in the back seat and went inside to chat for a while.

    So, at home the Moassberg 190 K-A has pieces that could be sold on Nummrich (?)... the Other two are probably worthless. They are in my steele cabinet (locked...of course, this is CA!).

    But there is this 67A. It doesn’t seem to be a lost cause. Watching a video on how to dissasemble it I was able to look into the bore, certainly not 100%, but some shine remains. I got the bolt apart and back together with a minimal of fuss (cockiness building!?).

    Larry Potterfield showed his off and did his 40 or so things...and got me thinking...I have checkering tools, I could blue a barrel, I could mess up royally and have the cost very little (a working gun looks like it is about $55-75). I didn’t pay for it, so to gain is experience and great satisfaction; at risk is hours and of course the money I’ll spend buying stuff...

    So, Lord willing I’ll get some picks posted and I’ll start asking questions. I will need all the free advice you can give me. Also a piece of ebony I can make a schnable end with...

    I will also be googling stuff (like, how expensive are crowning tools and can I do that!?).

    I’ve seen you all do crazy stuff, maybe this is my crazy moment.

    Thanks for encouragement and friendly feedback.

    God bless America!

    Thanks,
    Greg
     

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  2. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    On the second to last picture is the rear sight. How do I get that off? Is it dovetailed or is it pinched on?

    On the last pic you see the cocking handle on the back of the bolt assembly. It was at one time blued, the knurling remains, so how do I take the rust off that?

    And for the rust on the chrome, is it possible to rechrome something?

    As I said, I will be going to YouTube land, but I’d like your input as well...

    Thanks again.
    Greg
     
  3. Col. Harrumph

    Col. Harrumph Member

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    Man that looks like it'd be worth a try. The stock is salvageable and the metal probably is too, though you'll have to deal with the pits.

    I'd start by dismounting the stock and soaking the assembled receiver/barrel in a bath of Kroil for a week or two.
     
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  4. MihiT

    MihiT Member

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    Electrolytic rust removal is your friend.

    Re-chroming is not a DIY job. I'd be surprised to find chrome plating on a gun.

    Sight indeed looks dovetailed in. Use a hammer and brass drift, usually driven IN from the right side, so bang them out from the left. Pre-soak in diesel/WD40/Kroil and gentle heat (Heat gun, not oxy-acetylene torch) before trying.

    I have heard tell of people re-crowning with hand tools, hell a flat file and decent engineers square can do it, but 5 minutes on a lathe will have a nice rebated and correctly angled crown no-fuss.

    Re-bluing can also be done at home. You must be meticulous about surface prep. Don't waste your time with cold blue. Either accelerated-rust (safe and fairly non toxic, but long), or hot blue (hot, toxic vapours, will rust everything down wind and you need salts boiling at several hundred metric degrees)

    It didn't get all f*d up in five minutes, don't expect to fix it in that time.

    Coopers paint/finish stripper seems to be available most places. Not cheap, very effective.
    Down here we have a product called Emer-gel which is basically dilute phosphoric acid - it will lift old finishes and oil but leave wood grain in tact.
    Wood dents usually get steamed out.

    And that's gun-fixery 101.
     
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  5. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    I will google ‘steaming dents’. There is really only one dent and that isn’t very big. Planning to do some reshaping anyway. I know it will take the ‘collector value’ away, but as I said, this isn’t an expensive gun. And I am wanting it for a kid gun when it is finished.

    Thanks guys: excited...
    Greg
     
  6. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    Good project to learn on. I think it can be restored to really acceptable condition. Look on here for posts by TINCANBANDIT to see some really nice restoration work for inspiration and ideas.
     
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  7. 1KPerDay

    1KPerDay Member

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    These are fairly straightforward mechanically. Have a close look at the extractor blade as they are often chipped. It's the triangle pointing up near the front of the sear piece. There are repros available. Don't dry fire it without something suitable in the chamber.
     
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  8. Col. Harrumph

    Col. Harrumph Member

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    351 WINCHESTER and ExAgoradzo like this.
  9. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    So, I want to shorten the forestock because the barrel seems absurdly short. But I don’t know what kind of ratio I should use.

    I also intend to make an ebony forend cap (and a pistol grip cap from the same piece). So, how short should I cut the stock.

    Pictures make the yard stick look off, it is not. The squares are there to give you a good idea of the true lengths..

    Thanks again guys!

    Greg
     

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  10. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    BTW:
    So I googled electrolysis. I have everything except a trough and some spare rebar. I will get those tomorrow.

    Haven’t yet looked into bluing, will look into that later.

    As you see in the above reply I am hoping to start in the stock.

    Excited about the project, but I already foresee times in the near future it will stall because of other stuff...

    Greg
     
  11. beag_nut

    beag_nut Member

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    When you wish to get the ebony, there are many online sources. Some, like Eisenbrand, sell (nowadays) only in lot quantities. Others sell by the piece. Be sure to see a pic of their offerings before buying, since you want black ebony and not some other variety, of which there are many. As far as the ratio of the forend to the rest, look at as many existing rifles as you can. Gunbroker and similar might help you there. I have never seen a contrasting cap longer than 2". And, many have a spacer section of white color between the stock and the cap.
     
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  12. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    So excited!

    I the time it took to watch two episodes of Big Bang almost all the rust came off the barrel!!!

    I’m sure you can’t see it, but I will do the barrel one more time the do the other pieces as well...

    Thanks for the input.

    Greg
     

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  13. MihiT

    MihiT Member

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    Too easy, eh?

    I have a multi-voltage power supply, but can't say I've noticed much in way of "resolution" changes on the surface finish. Even high voltage on small parts seems to clean out all the small pits.

    It will flash rust, you can either oil it, or start your bluing from here, drop it into boiling water to convert/fix the black oxide.
     
  14. ExAgoradzo

    ExAgoradzo Member

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    I sprayed the barrel with Rem oil last night after running a brass brush several times through the bore. Thanks for the tip on boiling water. I’ll do that with the other pieces I do...

    The blueing is gone. The water turned green before it turned brown as it was ‘boiling’.

    I may decide sanding is the best way to remove the little rust remaining. I want to watch some videos on how to blue, and see what the cost to benefit ratio is to cold bluing and other forms listed above. I don’t want to make a huge investment, but if it really isn’t that much I will see what kinds of tools/materials are needed to polish and blue a gun..

    Thanks,
    Greg
     
  15. BBBBill

    BBBBill Member

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    I built a de-rusting tank out of 4" PVC. It uses distilled water and a battery charger along with a sacrificial piece of steel (piece of angle from Lowes/Home Depot). Works great.
    Rust bluing is inexpensive, but a bit labor intensive. It does produce a beautiful blue when done correctly. Brownell's stocks several formulas.
     
  16. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    With that shorter barrel yours may be the "youth" model and thats the way it came from the factory. Even in it's condition I'd leave the stock the way it is and just refinish it. Youth models aren't as common as the standard ones.
     
  17. SGW Gunsmith

    SGW Gunsmith Member

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    Collector value was lost when the barrel was "circumcised". Originally, the Winchester Model 67A had a 27-inch long barrel. I still have the one I got when I was a kid and now use it to verify advertised and box printed .22 rimfire velocities when shooting over my chronograph.

    lYF6Z8Sl.jpg
     
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  18. Scooter22

    Scooter22 Member

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    I think he should do some mesurments to determinn if that a Youth or Boys model with 20" barrel. They were only marked 67A. Sure looks like it could be from the pics.

    Boy's Rifle
    In August 1937, acting on a suggestion by Adolph Topperwein, Winchester introduced a smaller version intended to be marketed as a child's first rifle. This barrel was shortened to 20 inches (510 mm), the length of pull of the stock was reduced by 1.19 inches (30 mm), and its weight was 4.5 pounds (2.0 kg), 0.5 pounds (0.2 kg) lighter than the standard model.[6] This model was known as the Junior Model[6] or, perhaps more popularly, the Boy's Rifle
    https://www.gunbroker.com/item/805740444
    https://www.gunbroker.com/item/803939156


    [​IMG]
    pix691264663.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2019
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