Wool Socks

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Axis II, Sep 7, 2021.

  1. Axis II

    Axis II Member

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    What wool sock does everyone like? I am going to try and use my rubber boots as long as possible and figure a good wool sock will help with the cold and then I can wear an 800 gram boot with wool. I usually buy the walmart ones but even with 1k gram boots my feet get cold.
     
  2. Alaskan Ironworker

    Alaskan Ironworker Member

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    Try smartwool “mountaineering” socks. Tested multiple winters working outside in fairbanks!
     
  3. Gary Gill

    Gary Gill Member

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    I backpack and hunt in Smartwool socks. Mine have been great quality products.
     
  4. JohnB-40

    JohnB-40 Member

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    Darn Tough heavy cushion
     
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  5. .38 Special

    .38 Special Member

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    These are my favorites, but are thick enough that they normally require a half-size up in boots, at least for me. For lighter use, I've actually had really good results with Orvis "Invincible" wool socks. They often are on sale for $30-$40 per three-pack, and they do last a very long time.
     
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  6. Dale Alan

    Dale Alan member

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  7. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    Always good to wear a thin silk or synthetic sock under the wool to wick the moisture off your feet, especially if wearing rubber boots.
     
  8. Thomasss

    Thomasss Member

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    Wigwam is the best wool sock money can buy, made in Sheboygan Wisconsin.
     
  9. CoalCrackerAl

    CoalCrackerAl Member

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    I bought mine at walmart. Over in the hunting area. I forget the brand. They are nice and thick. But them combined with light weight 800 mg thinsulate Herman survivors. Have been working well for while siting for deer. My Rocky's are heavy and hurt my hips when i walk with them. They do work well in the cold though with regular socks though.
     
  10. rabid wombat

    rabid wombat Member

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    I have some Cabela’s that are pretty nice. Pre Bass Pro, so I cannot comment on the current state of affairs…
     
  11. Fyrstyk

    Fyrstyk Member

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    I like pure alpaca wool socks with a silk liner. My feet sweat something terrible, so before putting on my socks I spray my feet with an antiperspirant powder. (no perfume) .
     
  12. Lo-Profile

    Lo-Profile Member

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    I wear the wool Dickie's brand with a thin nylon sock underneath.
    I wear the same sock in cotton in the summer.
    Cotton are red , Wool are blue
     
  13. troy fairweather

    troy fairweather Member

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    I've always used wigwam wool socks, can get them about anywhere here locally. I have to get some more this season. I have another pair don't know the brand but there really good, things are like 3/8" thick but some boots I've got they don't work in.
     
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  14. Starter52

    Starter52 Member

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    Another fan of Vermont-made Darn Tough wool socks.
     
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  15. X62503

    X62503 Member

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    Darn Tough!
     
  16. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Darn Tough, if you want best price be damned. Good news is that they last a long time. Smartwool would be 2nd choice. Still pricy, but a little more reasonable. I save my Darn Tough for the harshest conditions.

    If you can shop at Costco, or get someone with a membership to buy them their store brand is pretty good for the money. I'm thinking 3 pair for around $20. In winter I wear those for everyday use and save my expensive ones for bad weather or hunting.
     
  17. Rubone

    Rubone Member

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    Most of the old "Merino Wool" Cabela's socks were made by the Carolina sock company. Most still exist under their name.
    I've had good wear and long life from Smartwool as well.
    I've given up on Wigwam myself. And I used to sell them in a different life!
     
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  18. Howland937

    Howland937 Member

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    The higher % merino wool, the better. I've got some of the Darn Tough, Cabot and Sons, and some from QVC. None of mine are 100% wool, but the ones that are above 50% keep my feet warmest. I don't wear a liner under them unless it's super cold. Even on days when it warms up into the 60's they breathe fine paired with Gore-Tex boots.
     
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  19. 1976B.L.Johns.

    1976B.L.Johns. Member

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    Smartwool....a bit spendy but worth it!
     
  20. Random 8

    Random 8 Member

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    Living and working outdoors in Northern MN, I consider myself a connoisseur of sorts when it comes to cold weather gear in general, and especially footwear.

    You're on the right track looking to a waterproof rubber boot and wool socks! I'll give you a few levels of cold/wet, and what I wear. Rationale will come at the end so I don't bore you.

    All levels of hot and cold: ALL BOOTS Lacrosse 6mm wool felt insole. Lose the gel pack and OEM garbage. Heavy wool felt under your soles is the way to go. There are a few kinds with foil looking stuff in them. They work well too, make sure they are sufficiently thick for cushion and to insulate the part of your foot that has the most contact with heat sucking ground, snow, ice, etc.

    Mild cold down to about 20F and relatively active, sedentary to the mid 20's: Wigwam cotton boot sock, Generic "medium" Merino wool sock in uninsulated boots. This is my standard late fall work or walking setup for leather or rubber boots.

    Medium cold, down to low teens and sedentary activities to 20F or so: Generic silk liner sock. Heavy, lofty wool/acrylic sock. Oversized boot with some insulation value to the boot. My standard "deer stand" setup in moderate cold, with a Kamik 800 gram under-knee rubber boot. This is grainy snow territory in MN. The crystals seem to get everywhere, and the extra loft provides some protection.

    Deep cold, to 0F, single digits for sedentary activities: Silk liner sock. Heavyweight Alpacas of Montana Alpaca wool sock. Worth every damn penny! Boot with significant insulation value. I wear a Viking logger/lineman boot for this application. One could do well with any of the Baffin or Kamik felt and thinsulate rubber pac boots if they didn't need the extra PPE for work. They're $250 rigger boots, so I give them a dual life for work and play.

    Severe cold. Below zero, sedentary activities...good luck!: Same as above, but I'll add an Angora (rabbit wool) ankle sock over the silk layer if the boots allow enough room to not be constricted. My deep cold boots do. I've found nothing that will keep my feet warm in sedentary activities near or below zero for more than 1 hour. I try to avoid sitting still at those temperatures unless it's napping by the wood stove at camp or sitting in the sauna. This level of cold is no joke. Be sure to have a fire kit and know how to use it. You can lose toes before your vehicle heater throws enough heat to keep frostbite from setting in. Pro tip, use the exhaust in an emergency, it warms up far faster than the heater.

    Rationale: Everybody's feet and circulation are different, so your results may vary! The biggest risk to cold feet constricted circulation. Second is sweat and the inability to wick it away. Silk and cotton are excellent at wicking water, and silk has the bonus of a very high R value by weight and thickness. At warmer temps, I'm more concerned with my feet being too hot, hence the use of cotton and thin wool there. At around the 20F mark, I start desiring more insulation value. I find the lofty generic wool/acrylic socks in a loose fitting boot to be the answer here. Air is a fine insulator. Any colder, I break out the big guns in the expensive Alpaca socks, which are heavy and quite lofty. Alpaca and Angora are superior insulators to sheeps wool. If I could find Yak wool or a goose down sock product, I'd wear it. That's better yet. Don't constrict your circulation! Any tightness in your sock wear and you will have cold feet. Hope this helps!

    They've come down in price since the last time I bought them. Don't let the pretty ski-bunnies and sad hipsters in their adds fool you. These socks are legit on the pipeline and the deer woods too! https://alpacasofmontana.com/collections/hunting/products/alpaca-arctic-socks-warm
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2021
  21. 9x56MS

    9x56MS Member

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    Always read the packaging before buying if not over 50%wool move on. It amazes me the socks with 30%wool are still labeled wool socks. I have many different brands but have recently started buying merino wool and alpaca wool socks and love both of them. Frostbite my toes in Germany on maneuvers so have a hard time keeping them warm. The thicker the wool the warmer they stay. Always wear a synthetic liner sock it makes a huge difference.
     
  22. Fyrstyk

    Fyrstyk Member

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    As a former surveyor that spent many an hour standing behind a survey instrument in bitter cold conditions, I found that if you will be standing (or sitting) in one place for long periods of time in bitter cold weather it is best to have something to put your feet on to keep the cold from coming up into your feet. I always carried a 2' X 2' X 2" styrofoam pad to stand on. In a deer stand I have a foam pad to put my feet on and I use boot blankets over my hunting books for extra warmth. In really cold conditions I will put some chemical boot warmers in the boot blankets. So far I have endured 8 + hours in -20 degree temps on my deer stand, but I didn't see a thing that day. I guess the deer are a lot smarter than me.
     
  23. entropy

    entropy Member

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    The highest % merino I can find, but I've been using alpaca more often.

    https://alpacasofmontana.com/collections/warm-socks

    If these and a silk or poly liner sock don't keep your feet warm, you'd better check and see if they are still there.

    Like Random 8, I grew up in MN, but now live in NW WI. Every bit of advice he gives here is gold.

    Except 0F is not deep cold. :p
     
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  24. South Prairie Jim

    South Prairie Jim Member

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    Huh
    I guess I'll be the minority with Carhart socks Keen low cuts and gaiters. Never wet or cold.
     
  25. Alaskan Ironworker

    Alaskan Ironworker Member

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