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Worn out case tumblers. Should I try to fix them or throw them out?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Capstick1, Aug 17, 2017.

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  1. Capstick1

    Capstick1 Member

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    I have two vibratory case tumblers. One's made by Lyman and the other ones made by Midway. Both of them are atleast 12 years old or more. When I plug them in instead of going into vibration mode and tumbling the cases I just hear a quiet hum coming from the motors and that's about it. Can these electric motors be fixed for a reasonable cost or should I just throw them out and get a new case tumbler?
     
  2. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    Save the bowls, toss the rest.
     
  3. FROGO207

    FROGO207 Member

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    You might be able to buy a replacement motor but is it worth spending that for a used machine? Make sure the motor is thermally protected if you substitute a different one than a OEM replacement in it to prevent fires though.
     
  4. edwardware

    edwardware Member

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    Can't tell until you tear into it. Could be as simple as a loose eccentric weight.

    FWIW, I'll buy a Berry's from Brownell's when my FA tumbler dies. Good price, best warranty I can find.
     
    Kaldor likes this.
  5. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    If the has ball bearings, perhaps. If not, you'd have to find a replacement motor at Grainger or somewhere like that.
     
  6. Catpop

    Catpop Member

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    A bad startup capacitor maybe?
     
  7. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    Are the motors turning? If so the weights have fallen off and they can't shake without one.

    If they are not turning see if you can turn them by hand. If you can but they feel less than "free" try addi some oil to the shaft and get it to run down to the bushing(s).

    If the bushing(s) are worn and that is allowing the armature (guts inside) to touch, you can likely replace it with an oillite bushing from a bearing supply house.
     
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  8. salpal48

    salpal48 Member

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    Worn out reloading tumblers are Not worth fixin. They were junk to begin with. I have leaned to Buy better made items. . If you want to buy once and will last min of 20 years . Think Lortone, diamond pacific, Covengton. . Lorton being The cheapest model QT 12
    My lortone was purchase in the 1970's. and still going strong. There is always an excuse not to spend the extra money . But there is always money to buy Cheap again
     
  9. Bwana John

    Bwana John Member

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    My 1991 RCBS vibrating tumbler lasted until 2009.

    After the motor burned out RCBS replaced it. That motor lasted 3 months. They replaced just the motor that time. 3 months after that another burn out and replacement. This went on for 6!!! replacements!!!

    I was an exclusive green coolaid drinker because of RCBS customer service and replacement policy until these problems, now I have Hornady and Dillon tools on the bench along with RCBS.

    RCBS lost some of my business because of their decision to cheap out on their tumblers.
     
  10. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    Possibly, but when you can replace a vibratory tumbler for between $40 and $80 (depending on model and capacity) the hassle and expense of sourcing the repair parts and then making the repairs hardly seems worth what are likely to be only modest savings.
     
  11. boom boom
    • Contributing Member

    boom boom Contributing Member

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    I vote for replace despite being really cheap and first thinking repair it. How much is your time and trouble worth?
     
  12. Kaldor

    Kaldor Member

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    Yup, often times the motor just needs a little TLC. Clean, lube and test. The dust from dry tumbling doesnt really wear the motor out, just gums it up.
     
  13. thomas15

    thomas15 Member

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    Where I work we have a Thumblers vibratory tumbler that gets used 2-3 days/week for 6 hours or so. We use it to tumble small ceramic insulators. This thing has been going strong for at least 15 years of heavy service. When I need to replace my present tumbler it will be with one of these.
     
  14. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    I like this attitude as well. I've picked up a lot of "trash" over the years. I think the best was a $2000 Jennair grill that just needed a new regulator but I picked up a 5 gallon shop vac two days ago I noticed set out for trash pickup, that needed a $0.02 crimp connector replaced and it runs like a top.
     
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  15. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I am a scrounger as well, and like to fix things, but sometimes it isn't worth the time, unless you just like to and have the time.

    People throw away all kinds of good stuff that needs very little repair. They just don't have the know how and/or don't want to fool with it.
     
  16. mdi

    mdi Member

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    You won't know until you open it up. Motor turning? Loose connection between motor and bowl? Inexpensive motors can be found on ebay.

    I like to fix things. (life long machinist/mechanic) and I've been known to repair an item that could have been purchased new for less. I'm not poor and not cheap either, but I don't go with the old "buy once, cry once" line of thinking. Would I rather have a 30 year old, expensive tumbler that still works or a tumbler that is 15 years old that I fixed? Or a 30 year old $$$ tumbler vs. a new $ tumbler that will last me another 15 years...
     
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