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Would getting a more expensive AR-15 be worth it?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by bos19, Jul 22, 2019.

  1. Bill Raby

    Bill Raby Member

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    You can buy a 1911 for around $500 or you can buy one for $5000+. They are both basically the same thing. You can buy a car for under $15,000 or you can buy one for over $1 million. AR-15 is no different. An expensive one is likely to be better quality than a cheap one. Being worth it or not is up to you. You would likely enjoy owning the expensive one more, but don't count on it to work much better.
     
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  2. TTv2

    TTv2 Member

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    IMO, no. If you're going to spend that kind of money on an AR, make it a .308 AR.

    A grand is my ceiling for a 5.56 AR. Above that price, I don't see what you're getting in return from a factory made AR and there's an extremely high chance you're going to end up paying $200+ to put a drop in trigger in it anyway.
     
  3. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

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    Why not go one piece at a time? You'll take a loss selling your current one. Upgrade the grip and trigger and you'll be happier.
     
  4. bassjam

    bassjam Member

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    That's the bare minimum to do it RIGHT. There's plenty of people out there that have built AR's with far less than that though.
     
  5. FlSwampRat

    FlSwampRat Member

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    I'm a fan of starting off with "good enough". AR's, particularly, lend themselves to this concept as they are modular and can be upgraded as one's abilities and comfort level with the platform increase. Buying a Krieghoff shotgun to learn how to skeet shoot, for example, is nuts IMHO, unless you have many more commas in your bank balance amount than I do.
     
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  6. IndianaBoy

    IndianaBoy Member

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    True.


    You could do it with a vice a pipe wrench, and some vice grips.
     
  7. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    I hardly use any tools at all on my rifles. My side charging uppers don’t fit in the vise blocks so I just put them sideways in the bench vise padded with an old T shirt. My slim free float tubes use an adjustable wrench rather than the armorers wrench, and a rifle buffer goes on without a castle nut. Only special tool I use really is roll pin starters. I could rebuild mine with the tools in the back of my suburban.
     
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  8. Hokkmike

    Hokkmike Member

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    Two things that cause most of mans' misery are:

    1. Wanting what you don't have.
    2. No appreciating what you do have.

    In the end if your AR is reliable and can hit then you are good. But, if you have the money and it make you happy to upgrade then why not? For the most part these are range toys anyway.
     
  9. rskent

    rskent Member

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    OK, great. Now go do some research on AR triggers and pick up a good trigger for it. What do you have for an optic?
     
  10. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    There is no need for a replacement trigger. Standard AR triggers can be smoothed out with effort. Buy a better trigger because you want one, not because you think you need one. Even so, shoot the AR a lot before buying a new trigger.
     
  11. DustyGmt

    DustyGmt Member

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    Aftermarket Grip. $25-$35
    Stock upgrade. $35-$80
    Handguard upgrade. $40-$200
    Geissele trigger $140 Larue trigger $90

    For me these are the only upgrades worth fretting over and they will drastically improve ergos and function of the rifle. For as lil as $300 into your rifle you can run and gun with the best of em.... nothing wrong with going for the higher end stuff either, just dont think of your smith as some entry level puke because its affordable. It's made well and will serve your purposes just fine
     
  12. IndianaBoy

    IndianaBoy Member

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    Respectfully disagree.

    I see no reason to deal with the stacking, the creep, and the weight of a standard trigger.

    A smoothed up mil-spec trigger will never be as good as a true high quality improved design trigger.

    A better trigger makes it much easier to be a good rifleman. It removes a source of error from the shooter part of the equation, not breaking a clean shot because you were struggling to pull your way through a creepy trigger.

    A trigger might be the best single upgrade to an AR-15 to aid in accurate shooting. Close tie with a proper sighting system.
     
  13. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    If the standard trigger is crunchy-ticky, I would agree. But with a little effort, the standard trigger can be changed up and smoothed out. After disassembling and cleaning the trigger, apply grease and reassemble. Then, use the forefinger and thumb to place a little upward pressure on the hammer as you dry fire. Just a little pressure. You don't want to round off the sears or chip the corners. This will smooth out the pull tremendously.

    I think most shooters should smooth out the trigger their AR comes with and shoot enough to get an understanding of safety features of the trigger before replacing it. Most shooters don't realize the long sear engagement of the standard and two stage triggers is there to prevent unintended discharges from rough handling and doubling and tripling.

    A good quality trigger has a smooth, predictable pull. A trigger can have a short, crisp, light break and not be a quality trigger. Once a standard AR trigger is smoothed out, the pull has long creep, but it's feel is always the same and does not stack. It also has the added bonus of being drop same, a feature that's particularly important on a self loading rifle. Once smoothed out, the standard trigger is a quality trigger.

    What many think of as a "quality" the -light, short, crisp break- isn't always the best trigger for the job. A shooter won't know what trigger to get until they put rounds down range. I've got standard AR triggers that are perfect for the job I use use them for and it would be a waste of money to replace them with something else.

    I'm all for quality triggers with clean, crisp breaks, but I bought them because they are what I wanted, not because I need them to shoot an AR or to develop a good trigger finger.
     
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  14. If1HitU

    If1HitU Member

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    I am more then satisfied with mu Ruger AR 556,I don't need a more expensive AR.:thumbup:
     
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  15. sarduy

    sarduy Member

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    before you spend $2000 give those grips a try, if you can go to your local shop and try one it would be perfect.

    the first it's the MAGPUL MOE+ it has a rubber coating and it feels great.
    MAG416_BLK_1.jpg
    the second it's the BCM Gunfighter MOD-3, it doesn't have a rubber coating but it feels great on the hand.
    opplanet-bcm-gfgmod-3-blk-pistol-grip-mod-3-bcm-g6-gfgmod-3-blk-v1.jpg

    finally my favorite, the "Magpul MOE K2+ same rubber coating as the first but the grip is a bit more vertical.
    MAG532_BLK_1.png
     
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  16. sarduy

    sarduy Member

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    of the components that you mention, the hand guard and stock have nothing to do with "high end",

    Barrel, Bolt, Trigger and Gas-Block are more important than a stock and hand guard. and even some Mil-spec triggers are good if you know where to get them from.
     
  17. sarduy

    sarduy Member

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    This easy, and you dont need the tool, you can do it with your hand.


     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2019
  18. sarduy

    sarduy Member

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    NO!, let's say you have 1000 to buy a "more expensive AR-15"... i recommend you get the following..

    UTG PRO Model 4/15 Drop In Quad Rail Handguard - Carbine - Black (see video installation)
    https://www.primaryarms.com/leapers...ngth-drop-in-quad-rail-with-extension-mtu001t

    Magpul MOE-K2 Pistol Grip - Black (ON SALE) $16.00
    https://www.primaryarms.com/magpul-moe-k2-pistol-grip-black


    Magpul PMAG 30 AR-15 (ON SALE) $10.00
    https://www.primaryarms.com/magpul-pmag-30-ar15-m4-gen-m2-moe-5.56-nato-magazine-black-polymer


    *1000 rounds of ammo and some Carbine training classes.

    you will learn a lot more by using the ammo in training than going and buying a new rifle.

    TRAINING > EXPENSIVE RIFLE.
     
  19. Browning

    Browning Member

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    At this point I would probably say no for you.

    Basically what I did when I gave AR’s another chance (I use to hate them) was to buy something decent and then get my money’s worth by shooting thousands upon thousands of rds out of it.

    I put on a few accessories, made it how I wanted, used it extensively but eventually I also wanted a different AR for a slightly different purpose (hunting).

    So I got something else as well. However I tried it out and made sure that it was something that I was going to be into and I wrung out my initial purchase.

    So if I had it to do over again I’d do the same thing. Make sure that I’d be using it quite a bit before
     
  20. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    From what Ive researched, you are absolutely right. What I meant was a more expensive build. The stock and hand guard I want are expensive and usually expensive means more user friendly/comfortable or more in tune with the build I’m looking for and some folks will classify that as high end.

    If I were to look for a rifle off the shelf that had what I wanted it would be over $1500 and that is the least expensive one JP builds. Plus it has “high end” stuff I don’t care about.

    I’m not going to roll with a good barrel and trigger and gas block with a rattle trap cheapo stock and no free float HG.

    What you or I say is important is not what everyone else will say either.
     
  21. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    You can keep that long trigger creep. All of mine have been polished and have the set screw mod to take out all the pre travel.
     
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  22. Browning

    Browning Member

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    Same here.

    I’ve just replaced most of mine though. Whether I’ve replaced them with Geissele, LaRue, RRA or even just an ALG Defense QMS or ACT (I generally stick with two stage triggers), they’ve all gotten something better.
     
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  23. rb288

    rb288 Member

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    If it shoots when you pull the trigger and it is accurate enough for you, you don't need to sprnd alot of money for a "more expensive" ar.
    Learn with what you have, modify it as you see fit, and make it your own.
     
  24. MistWolf

    MistWolf Member

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    There are potential problems with polished AR triggers and using set screws to remove creep. Standard AR triggers are case hardened. Some have shallower case hardening than others and even just polishing runs the risk is thinning the hardened layer enough that the softer material underneath is exposed leading to accelerated wear and eventual doubling, tripling and even runaways.

    The pre-ignition travel is the result of the long sear engagement that prevents sear bounce from rough handling (such as the weapon being dropped) leading to an unintentional discharge. The set screw reduces that margin of safety.

    Combine polishing with set screws without fully understanding the risks is a recipe for disaster. People are dead set against the Walker trigger Remington used for many years because of the potential for unintended discharges. Yet, they are willing to make modifications that risks the same condition in a self loading rifle that has the potential for multiple discharges. At least the Remington will only fire once. An unsafe trigger is not a better trigger.

    There are better ways to improve an AR trigger. One possibility is to replace the standard AR trigger with an $80 Sionics two stage. I say possibility because I haven't tried it myself yet, but what I'm hearing about it from trusted sources has me intrigued. Sionics is one of those companies that takes their time to ensure their products are of the highest quality and aren't afraid to own any mistakes.

    Dry firing will smooth out a trigger. One good way to improve any AR trigger that is often over looked is lubrication. Most AR triggers are installed dry. Removing the trigger and applying good clean grease before reinstallation goes a long way to improving feel. Trying these methods before dropping in a new trigger can save the shooter a good chunk change.
     
  25. someguy2800

    someguy2800 Member

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    Suit yourself I guess. Your not going to remove case hardening with 1500 grit wet paper and I leave plenty of sear engagement and spring tension to prevent an unintended sear disengagement and I also drop and bump test them when I’m done.

    The issue with the Remington triggers is a mechanical one which causes a part miss alignment that causes the sear to be held only by the safety and not the trigger. This is impossible in a properly functioning AR15 because the trigger is forced into engagement with the sear by the camming action of the selector switch. There is an increased chance of bump fire with a lighter AR trigger so it’s best to learn to ride the reset.
     
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