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Would it have killed you to text message me?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by LaEscopeta, Oct 7, 2006.

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  1. LaEscopeta

    LaEscopeta Member

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  2. Tommygunn

    Tommygunn Member

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    I don't usually like Doonesbury but that is a funny one!
     
  3. thumper723

    thumper723 Member

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    While having near instant comms with home is nice, I hate when my wife or other family members freak out becasue I haven't responded to their email within x hours.

    Instead of being glad they can email almost like normal, they complain that I don't call/email enough.

    And god help you if the ship or base goes on IT Lockdown for OPSEC reasons or equipment problems....
     
  4. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    After my first tour in Viet Nam, I was assigned to Fort Polk (those who have been there will understand, those who haven't, can't.)

    My wife and I drove onto post, I signed in, and we went to the Officers Club for lunch. As we were eating, another couple came in and sat at the table next to us. He was white as a sheet, his left arm gone at the elbow -- obviously his first time out of the hospital since being wounded.

    No sooner had her butt hit the chair than that woman started in on him -- "You can't believe what it's been like since you left. The washing machine broke, the children won't behave . . ." and on and on and on.

    I wanted to step over there, slap the crap out of her, and hand him my card, in case he needed more assistance later.;)
     
  5. Werewolf

    Werewolf Member

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    The attitude of the wife in the strip is atypical for military wives - they know what's going on and the ones that stick have learned to deal with the reality of a soldier's, sailor's or airman's job.

    Unfortunately the attitude depicted in the strip is pretty much the norm for folk who have never had any real contact with the military which I doubt Gary Trudeau has.

    Still - the strip was funny...
     
  6. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Member

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    Sounds like my EX-PMS.

    Pilgrim
     
  7. dragongoddess

    dragongoddess member

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    "Unfortunately the attitude depicted in the strip is pretty much the norm for folk who have never had any real contact with the military which I doubt Gary Trudeau has."


    Well apparently you don't even read the strip. If you did you would know Trudeau hit the nail on the head with BD's experience from losing the leg to his present day status.
     
  8. stillstanding

    stillstanding Member

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    I've not served in the military but my daughter married a navy man and true to form she complains to him on a regular basis via email. I at least try to remind her that it's not always up to him when he can contact her from on board in an undisclosed location.
     
  9. LaEscopeta

    LaEscopeta Member

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    http://www.blackanthem.com/News/military200608_1103.shtml

    (Bold text added by me.)

    Cartoonist Writes Second Book for Troops
    By Sgt. Sara Wood, American Forces Press Service
    Sep 27, 2006, 04:36

    Garry Trudeau (left), the author of "The War Within: One More Step at a Time," talks with Army Spc. Maxwell D. Ramsey and his wife, Ayako, at the Pentagon Sept. 26. Trudeau was meeting with wounded servicemembers and signing copies of his book, which chronicles the recovery of a wounded Iraqi war veteran. Photo by Sgt. Sara Wood, USA

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The award-winning creator of the Doonesbury cartoon strip visited the Pentagon today to meet with wounded servicemembers and sign copies of his second book in a series chronicling the recovery of a wounded Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran.

    Garry Trudeau wrote the book, "The War Within: One More Step at a Time," as a follow-up to his book, "The Long Road Home: One Step at a Time," which tells the story of comic strip character "B.D.," a National Guardsman who lost his leg during the battle of Fallujah in Iraq and suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. The second book follows B.D.'s return to civilian and family life after leaving the hospital and his process of dealing with his post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Trudeau said he's putting together these books, which are really a compilation of his comic strips, as a way to bring the war home to Americans, many of whom may not know any servicemembers or understand the sacrifices they're making.

    "America in general has not been asked to sacrifice much for this particular war," Trudeau said. "Their world has nothing to do with the military world. I think it's important, if you're given a platform that I've been given, to try to bring those two worlds together and say, 'Look, these guys are making some pretty heavy sacrifices and contributions in our name, and we should know a little bit more about them.'"

    Trudeau was encouraged to publish the books by the Fisher House Foundation, to which he is donating all the proceeds from these books. The foundation operates 34 Fisher Houses in the U.S. and Germany on the grounds of military and veterans hospitals. The houses give family members a place to live and be close to loved ones while they are hospitalized for an injury, illness or disease.

    Trudeau has met many servicemembers over the years and has recently spent a lot of time talking with military doctors, therapists, and veterans counselors to make his depiction of the recovery process as accurate as possible, he said. His regular comic strips are very satirical and political, he said, so working on this project has forced him to use a different mindset.

    "It's been quite an experience for me to work on this sort of naturalistic level and to try to understand," he said. "There's not much hyperbole in this; this pretty closely tracks what a soldier would actually go through. I try not to exaggerate, and it's important our countrymen understand some of the sacrifices that returning warriors are going through."

    Trudeau's account of B.D.'s recovery is very accurate, according to the servicemembers who have read it and know firsthand what the experiences are like. Army Spc. Maxwell D. Ramsey, a left-leg amputee recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, said Trudeau did a good job using real-life events wounded troops face and identifying the issues they deal with. He noted a section in the first book in which B.D. gets frustrated with the constant expressions of gratitude from strangers, saying that is something he can relate to in his own life.

    "I'm one that was using humor to deflect and deflate the situation before I even got to Walter Reed to some degree, so seeing it manifested in a comic like this is, for me, appropriate and relieving in a way," he said. "I hope that others will take some measure from that. Anybody that's not feeling sorry for themselves will find the humor in this and giggle about it."

    Using humor to tackle such a sensitive subject was a challenge, Trudeau said, but humor is often an indispensable coping mechanism for people going through challenges like wounded troops go through. "Humor can sometimes be that thin membrane between you and madness that you need to create some perspective on your situation and move forward," he said.

    Trudeau said he received a lot of positive feedback about the first book, and that helped shape this book. He said he doesn't know yet how far B.D.'s story will go, but he hopes to see him recover enough to eventually be a peer counselor for newly returning wounded veterans.

    Army Spc. David Lease, another wounded servicemember Trudeau met with today, said the books are important because they bring to light the experiences of wounded troops and letting them know people care.

    "This is letting us know that they support us," Lease said. "They might not support the fact that we're over there, but they support us."

    As part of his attempt to inform Americans about the sacrifices servicemembers are making, Trudeau is launching a military blog on his Web site: www.doonesbury.com, he said. The blog, which launches Oct. 8, will be called "The sandbox" and will feature entries from servicemembers in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    "It's important that people understand," he said. "I think the wars are just too remote for people's minds. They see two, three minutes on the evening news, maybe, if they don't look away. And people just get on with their lives. I understand that; there's just so much stress that you want in your life. But at the same time, there's a lot of people over there fighting in our name, so I think we need to pay attention to what they're doing."
     
  10. mormonsniper

    mormonsniper Member

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    If I get an email from the daughter every 5 days or so I am happy. If I don't hear some thing in 10 days or so I get antsie:banghead: . She's a Blackhawk crew chief.

    She's doing better now. Even if it's just a "I'm ok" email note, that is better than nothing.
     
  11. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    Sounds great, but leftist Trudeau has been bad-mouthing the military, and the country, for years. His fake "sympathy" for our troops doesn't impress me. "Our troops are being hurt" is just another way of drumming up support for a pull out and surrender to radical Islam and terrorism.

    Jim
     
  12. FLCLIFF

    FLCLIFF Member

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    The tragic lack of understanding of military wives goes back to at least WWII. Just look at the movie The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. Perhaps the military needs to consider (if they are not already doing it) bringing spouses in for some pre deployment counseling so they can discuss their issues. I saw many LEO wives who had no clue about the things their spouses witnessed. I was lucky since my wife was a psychiatric nurse and gave me a lot of understanding. I have no idea if male spouses of military personnel or LEOs have the same issues.
     
  13. LaEscopeta

    LaEscopeta Member

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    As always, I'm not trying to get this moved to Legal and Political, but are there any examples of this? I would be particularly interested in examples supporting the contention "...drumming up support for a pull out and surrender to radical Islam and terrorism."
     
  14. DougW

    DougW Member

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    With my son in the sand box, a phone call is wonderful. He has just gotten e-mail in his common area, but that is sketchey too, depending on his duty that day. He has called us at 0300 and 0530 recently, since that was when he was able to get in line to use the phone. We can only wait and pray.
     
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