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Xmas present

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by Brin, Dec 29, 2016.

  1. Brin

    Brin Member

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    courtney-knife.jpg My daughter is quite the hunter and needs a good knife for skinning and cutting up game so I made her one out of recycled materials. The handle is elk, the guard and pummel are brass and the blade is forged out of a ball bearing. I triple quench the blade and then temper it at 450 for two 1 hour cycles. This steel is a bear to sharpen with stones so I used my 2x72 belt sander to raise a wire edge then buffed the edge on a razor sharp edge paper wheel. This knife is scary sharp.
     
    Gordon, bikerdoc and Shanghai McCoy like this.
  2. Shanghai McCoy

    Shanghai McCoy Member

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    Fine looking knife. Nicely done Sir. :thumbup:
     
  3. horsemen61

    horsemen61 Member

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    Damn that's beautiful great job!
     
  4. Zeke/PA

    Zeke/PA Member

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    Truly a beautiful looking knife!
     
  5. bikerdoc

    bikerdoc Moderator Staff Member

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    You sir have talent.
    Respect and admiration to your craftsmanship and attention to detail
     
  6. Brin

    Brin Member

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    Thanks folks for all the nice comments. Here are some details, the blade is 1/8” thick by 4” long and the sheath is made out of 8-9 oz leather.
     
  7. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Nice job.

    Ball bearing is pretty challenging to work with. What are the details on how you worked the bearing down?
     
  8. ironworkerwill

    ironworkerwill Member

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    52100 is common bearing steel. You're spot on at the 400° temper, someone's done their homework.

    Did you hammer it out flat then saw the pattern out?
     
  9. Cooldill

    Cooldill Member

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    I REALLY like that blade. Great little old west looking knife.
     
  10. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Brin

    Mighty impressive knife, especially in that you used what you referred to as recycled materials!
     
  11. Brin

    Brin Member

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    Hos, you are right, 52100 ball bearing steel is a bear to forge. Fortunately, I have a Kinyon style air hammer and a hot rolling mill. It would be next to impossible to hammer it down by hand. I heat the bearing to 2000 + degrees then work it down to 7/8” thick on the air hammer, reheat, then roll it on the mill to reduce thickness to what I am looking for. Then I work the distal taper in with the rolling mill (the taper from guard to the tip). Finally, I forge the spine to edge taper and finish the blade shape by hand.
     
  12. Brin

    Brin Member

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    Ironworkerwill, I try to forge my blades as close to finish as possible but if I need to cut, I have a plasma cuter. I temper my ball bearing steel to 450 degrees and my file will still skate across the edge. I put the Rockwell hardness at 60 plus.
     
  13. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Ironworkerwill,

    A smith wouldn't go to the trouble to forge a bearing out and then resort to cutting the blank when all they need to do is forge it to shape and then final grind it from there. No waste involved and it can be quicker.
     
  14. Brin

    Brin Member

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    The handle made out of the elk antler was found on top of a mountain. The brass guard and pummel is made from the buss bar out of a big 440 volt electric box. The ball bearings came off a steam generator the size of a small house. The black spacer is a piece of a mud shield off a junk car.
     
  15. ironworkerwill

    ironworkerwill Member

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    I've hammered several blades out of railroad spikes and found junk. I cut several out of sawmill blades.

    The iron and steel I use ain't nearly as tough as 52100. since I've never used a mechanical hammer, I can't know how precisely a shape that can be made.
     

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