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Yeah...that’s really going to encourage reporting stolen guns....

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by berettaprofessor, Oct 3, 2019.

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  1. berettaprofessor

    berettaprofessor Member

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    https://www.nhregister.com/policere...l-leads-to-reckless-endangerment-14486880.php

    Connecticut man leaves his gun in an unlocked car, it’s stolen, and after reporting it, he loses his pistol license and has the rest of his guns confiscated.

    Okay, I can understand he broke a new gun law for safe storage, and I suppose some would say the punishment fits the crime, but the article also quotes the local police as saying that locking your car is also not enough under the law, nor is having a “small safe” in the car. So what are citizens supposed to do, tote around a full-sized RSC?

    It really is just all about confiscating guns, isn’t it?
     
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  2. SharpDog

    SharpDog Member

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    Best thing would be to get in the car and drive out of Connecticut ... observing all firearms laws of course.
     
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  3. James Fonteneaux

    James Fonteneaux Member

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    More people need to wake up to these types of laws. Confiscating his other property that wasn't at the scene? What's that about? He admitted fault by reporting it. I agree, it really is about confiscation. Gives .gov more guns to sell...
     
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  4. old lady new shooter

    old lady new shooter Member

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    The article says "The new law makes it a crime to store a gun in a locked car if it is not also put into a safe, locked in the glove box or stored in the car’s trunk." I'm guessing the comment about "small safes" refers to the type of thing you put in your suitcase in order to fly with a firearm, i.e. it is portable. If you have a safe installed in your car by for example bolting it to the floor, I expect the size would be irrelevant. The person quoted should probably have referenced a "portable safe" rather than a "small safe".
     
  5. herrwalther

    herrwalther Member

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    This is why I am 100% against safe storage law. Any knucklehead politician or DA can say your method of storage isn't good enough and charge you with a crime.
     
  6. Outlaw75

    Outlaw75 Member

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    <sarcasm>

    Well you didn't expect them to track down the thief, did you?

    </sarcasm>
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2019
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  7. jar

    jar Member

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    Actually I think it would have been more reasonable to hold the person at least partially liable in any crimes committed using that gun in the future. As gun owners we need to take responsibility for securing our firearms at the minimal level required by law or more. His car was unlocked and the gun was not in a safe, locked in the glove box or stored in the car’s trunk.
     
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  8. Ks5shooter
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    Ks5shooter Contributing Member

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    Yep put it in the trunk.
     
  9. Rule3

    Rule3 Member

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    Do you have a link to the actual law?? The article stated he could have locked it in the glove box or the trunk.

    I searched and can not find the law related to vehicles.??

    "Under a new law that went into effect Oct. 1, Jerome was charged with a misdemeanor count of unsafe storage of a gun in a motor vehicle in addition to the reckless endangerment charge. The new law makes it a crime to store a gun in a locked car if it is not also put into a safe, locked in the glove box or stored in the car’s trunk."
     
  10. sparkyfender

    sparkyfender Member

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    Low hanging fruit. Much easier to charge a good citizen with BS than it is to actually chase down a criminal and punish him. I find this reprehensible.
     
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  11. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    What good is that going to do if they can get into the cabin of the car then pop the trunk from there?
     
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  12. Waveski

    Waveski Member

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    It is very important to be accurate when having these discussions. The above statement is incorrect - the article stated that a locked trunk , glove box or safe satisfies the law.
    The Police Captain did reference small safes as "not a solution" , but that appears to be in the context of an opinion or recommendation.

    All of this , of course , is taken from the article , not the actual law as written.

    I agree that this situation represents a deterrent to reporting stolen guns. Leaving a gun in an unlocked car overnight is grossly negligent , but in situation like this we are certain that the person who made a (big) mistake will be punished , while the liklihood that the thief will be caught is slim.

    In fairness , there must be some consequence for putting a gun on the street through gross irresponsibility. The key word here is responsibility.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2019
  13. SamT1

    SamT1 Member

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    Crazy times we live in when a thief isn’t really a thief unless you had stuff locked up tight.
     
  14. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    As bad as it is, I'd think it worse to have a stolen gun of mine recovered that I hadn't reported.
     
  15. jar

    jar Member

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    The thief is still a thief. That has absolutely nothing to do with our responsibilities as gun owners.
     
  16. fireside44

    fireside44 member

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    Exactly. If you aren't gonna keep those knives locked up I want to see you held accountable when they are used to commit crimes. And I'm not talking about child safety locks on your kitchen drawers, I'm talking quality safe bolted down in secure location and given a seal of approval by the authorities instead of just taking your word for it. You see, in the 21st century it's people like us who are ultimately responsible for crimes committed using weapons, not the actual perpetrator who has suffered undue neglect and hardship under a system designed to oppress him or her.
     
  17. Waveski

    Waveski Member

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    By your proposed standard , if I were to accidentally leave my truck open in the grocery store parking lot resulting in having it stolen , and the thief then uses that vehicle to run down and kill a bunch of kids in a schoolyard - should I
    the "at least partially liable" for those homicides?
     
  18. jar

    jar Member

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    Yup!
     
  19. jar

    jar Member

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    We are certainly partially a fault. It does not excuse the person committing the theft but it is our responsibility to try within reason to keep things, particularly firearms, safe.
     
  20. larryh1108

    larryh1108 Member

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    I moved out of CT in 2014. I lived there 3 long years. When they passed the (similar) NY Safe Act I decided that is was time to move.
    My point is, while I lived there, no permit was required to have a handgun in your home, or a rifle. I did get the concealed handgun permit to carry concealed.
    Maybe that law changed in the last 5 years (about no permit needed for home use). So, if that law still applies, what business did the police have to confiscate any gun he had inside his home? That makes no sense. Ok, grab his concealed handgun permit. I get it (but strongly disagree) but his guns inside the house? That sounds like an illegal seizure and a lawsuit should follow. Remember! CT is "The Constitution State" (state motto).
     
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  21. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    Yeah, if you get bored you can google guns stolen from FBI or police vehicle and find lots and lots of them.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/09...ssault-weapon-stolen-from-unattended-vehicle/

    https://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/guns-stolen-from-city-of-miami-police-cruisers-11230216

    Being at the top of the list right now.

    I’d say if they stole your vehicle and got injured in a crash, you “recklessly endangered” them by owing the car in the first place....of course I would be saying that sarcastically but they would likely seriously agree with me and likely use the “fact” to support eliminating private vehicle ownership...
     
  22. fireside44

    fireside44 member

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    Partially my butt. Fully liable. This is the 21st century, the criminal acted out because of circumstance. You were negligent. It's as if you committed the crime yourself. If it wasn't for you, he would've gone on to live an enlightened and blessed, law abiding existence.

    *sips soy wheatgrass latte, adjusts skinny jeans

    Yes, because I made someone steal something that didn't belong to him/her. Insert face into palm.

    Safe storage laws are arbitrary. I think you need to lock up your knives and you should be prosecuted if you don't. That pocketknife you left on your nightstand, that oughta be a crime. Now what?

    Just because you got people around ain't trustworthy with a weapon or foolishly moved into a high crime area doesn't mean I raised my kids like that or live in a hood like that. For years I had no problem breaking safe storage laws so my minor child would have access to a weapon in event of an emergency. Fortunately my kids are old enough now that I can leave guns loaded guns laying around without becoming a criminal. I was an anti safe storage law activist before anti safe storage law activism was cool. The only reason for a safe is so there is a place besides my wifes closet to put my guns and ammo.
     
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  23. Mousegun

    Mousegun Member

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    Eliminate "gun free" zones and the need to lock a gun in a car is eliminated also.
     
  24. ATLDave

    ATLDave Member

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    How do you feel about holding computer owners liable if their computers are hacked and used as "zombie" computers for various criminal behaviors (DDOS's, spamming, distributed brute-force decryption/hacking computations, etc.)? Because that likely occurs even more frequently than gun thefts.

    What about if a car owner leaves their car unlocked - or maybe just doesn't have the most advanced anti-theft technology - and the thief takes it for a traffic-law-flauting joyride? Or uses it as a getaway vehicle for a robbery? Those are also pretty common occurrences.

    I feel strongly that people should not leave routinely store guns in cars overnight/permanently, but I have strong reservations about ever making the victim of one crime liable for subsequent crimes by their criminal violator.
     
  25. jar

    jar Member

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    If the computer owner did not use reasonable methods to secure his computer and network the yes, that person should be held partially liable.

    And yes, if a person leaves a car unlocked and it is used in a crime then they too should be partially responsible.

    The point is that te law will establish what are reasonable precautions and as adults we should follow those laws.
     
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