Marlin "bullseye" on rifles.

.45Coltguy

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Going thru the safe, I noticed that not all Marlin rifles have the bullseye. My 39A does, my 25N and 336[actually, a model 3000?] does not. A actual 336 in 30-30 does. Did Marlin do this with certain models being "made" for certain vendors, like K-mart, Gemco and other stores? Just curious is all. Thanks.
 
To the best of my knowledge all of the walnut stocked guns had them. I can't recall for sure whether they were on the budget guns with hardwood stocks but I don't think so.

Years ago sling swivel studs didn't come from the factory. Lots of guys THOUGHT the bulls eye was where you were supposed to drill to install the studs. I've seen quite a few like that. I have an older rifle with the bullseye missing. The hole is there, but for some reason it is gone. I know they can be purchased.

I once repaired one where someone drilled it out for a stud. I removed the stud, placed it somewhere else and filled the hole with a new bullseye. I don't recall where I ordered from.
 
The Marlin Bullseye under JM was to indicate a walnut stock. Hardwood and laminate rifles did not get a bullseye. This mostly carried on through Remington ownsership. Ruger puts a red bullseye on everything thus far. Which suits me fine. Here and there you can find a Marlin without a bullseye and it has a walnut stock, dunno, sometimes they forgot the JM stamp also.
 
The Marlin Bullseye under JM was to indicate a walnut stock. Hardwood and laminate rifles did not get a bullseye. This mostly carried on through Remington ownsership. Ruger puts a red bullseye on everything thus far. Which suits me fine. Here and there you can find a Marlin without a bullseye and it has a walnut stock, dunno, sometimes they forgot the JM stamp also.
Yeah, my Marlin 25N has a walnut stock, JM stamp, but no "bullseye". The Model 3000 mentioned above has the JM stamp, but, no bullseye. Weird. Oh, well, they still shoot!
 
Sometimes they appear to be missing the bullseye because it was used to mount a sling stud. Which is not why it was there :what: . I looked at a nice pre-CBS 39A at a recent show and it was most definitely a beautiful and original walnut stock with no sling studs and no bullseye. It did have the JM stamp. I did not note the serial to memory but it was an old rifle, old being relative.
 
The Model 3000 was manufactured for United Merchandising Corp. in Hawthorne, CA. So no bullseye.
 
I am one of those that thought the bullseye was for a sling stud. I thought that because a gun clerk in a store called Turner’s Outdoorsman in SoCal told me that Marlin installed those so you wouldn’t damage the wood when drilling a hole for your sling stud.

I considered correcting it but I decided to leave it.
 
I checked my JM Marlins, all four have the bullseye. :)

Three of the four hanging out together; pre safety 336 .35 Rem, 1990’s 1895G .45/70, 1966 39A .22 LR:

IMG_4615.jpeg

(The other 1895CB is on the “looong gun” side of the safe.)

Stay safe.
 
The Marlin Bullseye is further up the stock than most people prefer to have their lower sling anyway.

I put my sling through the bullseye and it is in a perfect spot for me. I will likely move the sling slightly and restore the bullseye at some point. When I put the sling in, I didn't know much better. Marlin model 336 in 35Rem. Made in 1983
 
I put my sling through the bullseye and it is in a perfect spot for me. I will likely move the sling slightly and restore the bullseye at some point. When I put the sling in, I didn't know much better. Marlin model 336 in 35Rem. Made in 1983

I confess to having done that to a junky Model 60 when I was 14 yo give or take. The old Model 60 is now even more junky, but it does have a bullseye, poor thing, and a properly affixed sling stud.
 
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