Squib....a puzzle.

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Remington1911

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This is a long build up, so try to read it all, I would love answers to this.


First off Yes these are reloads, and at the bottom on the 38 range.

I am real, as in REAL anal on my reloading. So I can say with 99.9% that I did not load THREE rounds bad....I just see it as a no way.

I load a couple different "power factor" I guess I will say 38 loads, one is pretty stout for a 38/357 lever gun, the other are softer loads for some VERY old revolvers. The old revolvers sit around the house and are "easy" to get to just incase....you know. I know when I loaded the rounds that are in both of these guns, one an old J frame, the other a colt police positive from the 1930's. I had the rest of the rounds in the box and they got loaded back in June 2017. In the cabinet where all the reloads live the box that the rounds that are in the gun get a post note saying REVOLVERS. Now I don't remember when I loaded them (them being the revolvers not the ammo) but with my past health issues it is very possible they sat around from 2017. They are also smothered in ballastol.

Got them out to shoot saturday, and then again on sunday. Shot the PP on saturday, and first round was a poof, well that is not right. Sure enough a VERY dirty round and stuck halfway in the barrel. Well that ended that for the day. The next day I was thinking you know the stuff loaded in that J frame is out of the same batch....so I walked out back to give that one a go. First round did not sound right, but at least left the barrel....not hard it is so short, but it was just not right. Second (yea I know stupid) just cleared enough to open the gun up....ok done here. I brought down the lever and the box...I must have been out of it when I loaded these up. Every other round in the box is fine, shot 15 out of the box no issue at all. The only difference is these are greasy with ballastol.

I pulled down the rest of the loads that came out of the revolver, it looked like black goo. I pulled down a few in the box and it all looked fine, two out of the box, and IIRC 6 out of the revolvers. One in the revolver looked fine, but the others was a mix between tar, a bit clumpy, and "normal".

On the really "goo" looking cases the primers did nothing to a poof, some sounded normal, just put the empty cases in and clicked, really so odd.

The only thing I can think of is some of the ballastol worked its way around the bullets and into the case and contaminated the powder/primers.

After that long story, really looking for thoughts on this, never happened before, and again I have never used ballastol for "long time" storage.....I can only shutter to think what would happen if I had needed the thing, in a home intrusion type setting. These guns are not dripping in the ballastol but if you grabbed it you would know, yuck....greasy. Again just sitting out, in the open air for about 5 years or so.

Has anyone seen anything like this?
 
I've had it happen with Rem oil and CLP. I leave certain rifles loaded at all times. I have cleaned them and got a little free with the Rem Oil, go to shoot them a week or two later and chambered round ftf, but the rest of the magazine is fine. Now I take extra care to patch out any excess oil.
 
I've had it happen with Rem oil and CLP. I leave certain rifles loaded at all times. I have cleaned them and got a little free with the Rem Oil, go to shoot them a week or two later and chambered round ftf, but the rest of the magazine is fine. Now I take extra care to patch out any excess oil.

I could see that the round right there, with the revolver all of them are "in the gun".
 
I’ve heard of oil contaminating cartridges but I’ve never experienced it personally. I don’t think you need to keep guns “greasy” with oil, particularly any you plan to use for defense.

Yes, in general I don't anymore. I had a couple surgeries and I knew in advance it would sideline me a bit, so before I really coated the guns up thinking it would be a few years before really shooting them again. It was about 3 years before I could do the 22's, now I am good for about everything short of 12g manual shot guns, autos are ok, and the real heavy rifle and pistol cartridges.
 
Yes, in general I don't anymore. I had a couple surgeries and I knew in advance it would sideline me a bit, so before I really coated the guns up thinking it would be a few years before really shooting them again. It was about 3 years before I could do the 22's, now I am good for about everything short of 12g manual shot guns, autos are ok, and the real heavy rifle and pistol cartridges.
In that case probably best to swap out your ammo every few months at least. Maybe you could determine how long it takes for ballistol to wick past your primers/bullets.
 
Don't know what happened to you, but I had the same thing in a loaded 32 revolver. Had some 32 S&W longs loaded up and sat in safe for maybe a year. Took them out to shoot and every round was either a pfft or dropped 4 feet from the barrel. Other rounds loaded on the same day, kept in a plastic case, were all fine, just the ones left in the revolver chambers. Air around here is exceptionally dry in the safe, so probably wasn't moisture, but was it oil in the chambers? I don't know.
 
In that case probably best to swap out your ammo every few months at least. Maybe you could determine how long it takes for ballistol to wick past your primers/bullets.

Yup, now that I am able I generally shoot all the SD stuff on a monthly basis at least. I think it was just a time thing.

Anyone know what a shotgun that is stored nose up next to your bed looks like, the amount of dust and stuff in it was just amazing.

Another side to that story, I had the surgery scheduled, but something happened and it got moved up (I THINK) about 2 weeks. The basement was just left for about a year. I had primed rifle cases just sitting out. When I went down when I was going stir crazy and went to finish those cases up. I poured the powder in the charge master (powder always gets put up) and it dropped the first charge....I went to charge the case and half the powder fell out all over the place. Turns out spiders built little houses inside the cases.

Anothing thing to think about if you have to leave your stuff out for a while.
 
Don't know what happened to you, but I had the same thing in a loaded 32 revolver. Had some 32 S&W longs loaded up and sat in safe for maybe a year. Took them out to shoot and every round was either a pfft or dropped 4 feet from the barrel. Other rounds loaded on the same day, kept in a plastic case, were all fine, just the ones left in the revolver chambers. Air around here is exceptionally dry in the safe, so probably wasn't moisture, but was it oil in the chambers? I don't know.

Mirror image, same thing....and I bet those same plastic cases. Here it is humid as hell in the summer....but I doubt being in a plastic case vs in the gun would make that much difference. I really think it was the oil. I mean the cases that I pulled the bullets on just had goo in them, and some of those the primers just went pfft. The goo was like if you let paint sit for a while, and then just poured out everything but what settles on the bottom....just thick and gooey like that. Best I can describe.

Thanks for your help, got the bullet out of the J, but the PP is proving to be MUCH more difficult.
 
hearing stories like this is why I either shoot my reloads right away, which is my preference, or they go into a box. firearms that may not get fired for a long time, get factory ammo to sit around with. I've heard some people will seal the primer pockets on reloads like some factory ammo has, but I've never done it, or really considered it.
 
Says right on the label, “Outstanding penetrating oil, creeps into the finest cracks, loosens nuts and bolts.” I’d say a wipe with drop or two on a cotton rag is about all that’s needed to protect the finish from rust.
 
If a gun is to be stored loaded, it needs to be wiped down with a dry rag first - or perhaps with a silicone cloth at most.

If a gun is to be stored with a layer of grease or oil, it should be unloaded.

In the unlikely need to store a gun loaded for years without attention, wrapping it in VCI paper and placing it in a waterproof container may be the best reasonable option.
 
This is better than Ballistol and 5 times cheaper. 100% non-toxic too.
Unless the formula of Ballistol has changed, the FDA says Ballistol is non-toxic.
I have used it in the past and in so doing I always would remove any excess from the barrel or chamber because it would cause a flyer on the first shot. The Wisconsin distributor told me Ballistol is a highly refined mineral oil, which is sort of true, but there are other vegetable oils and addtives in it too.
 
When I attended the Montgomery, Alabama Police academy in 1979, there were stories going around about people using WD40 or penetrating oil to lubricate revolvers and it deadening primers.
I was always taught to wipe down and swab the chambers of firearms that were kept loaded for duty.

We also were required to shoot up all old duty ammo in the first relay at qualification.
I’ve encountered a few duds through the years.. ( but NOT mine...)

S&W used to ship each new revolver with a cleaning rod, brush and swab...
Hint, hint!!!
 
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This is better than Ballistol and 5 times cheaper. 100% non-toxic too.

View attachment 1073353
Olive oil spray isn't water-soluble like ballistol. To me this is one of the key benefits. And olive oil IMO isn't as effective a metal preservative and lubricant as ballistol. Ballistol/mineral oil isn't a superior formulation to any truly excellent lubricants or rust preventatives, but it works well at everything, and nothing else I'm aware of mixes with water and leaves behind a film of oil when the water evaporates, which is perfect for black powder use.
 
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