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Another firearm shipping question

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Snorkel Bob, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. Snorkel Bob

    Snorkel Bob New Member

    Jan 23, 2003
    Ive searched in old threads and its hard to find an exact answer to my question so Ill ask again.
    Friend of mine is from Hawaii and has 2 rifles he wants his Father to ship out to him. One he is going to keep and the other I am going to buy.
    What all is involved in shipping it. Has to go to an FFL right? How does that work if the rifles are already his? Will he have to go through a background check again?
  2. Jim K

    Jim K Elder

    Dec 31, 2002
    A person can ship a rifle to himself; an example is a person going on a hunting trip who wants to ship the rifle instead of carrying it. But this is not that case, so it doesn't matter whether who owns the guns, it is his father who is shipping them.

    The rifles will have to be shipped to an FFL dealer in Hawaii, who will undoubtedly charge a service charge. Some carrier clerks will claim that they can only accept a shipment FROM an FFL holder; that is not true, but refusal is a common problem. For shipping long guns, the easiest way may be to use the USPS (the Post Office); it is IMHO easier and cheaper. I recommend a separate box for each rifle; it costs more, but if a box gets lost, it is better to lose one than two. Insure the packages, of course.

    The recipient should contact a dealer in Hawaii and make arrangements to have the dealer send a signed copy of his FFL to the father to keep on file. That way, the father has proof that he shipped to a licensed dealer. The dealer needs to know that the shipment is coming so he can be on the lookout for it. The package should be marked (both inside and outside) with the son's name and a copy of the license enclosed.

    If the rifles fall into the curio and relic category, a collectors license holder can receive them, but it will be easier to find a cooperative dealer than a collectors licensee.



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