100 years from now?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by ontarget, Jan 25, 2020.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. JT-AR-MG42

    JT-AR-MG42 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2010
    Messages:
    682
    If the past 100 years (or past 1000) are any indicator, I would say yes.
    Lots of quality and precision out there today and I don't think those values go out of style.

    JT
     
    ontarget likes this.
  2. Mosin77

    Mosin77 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    487
    A revolver (or semi-auto for that matter) will kill just as efficiently in 2120 as today. So will be just as suitable for self defense or as an officer’s badge of rank. And probably in that year, the latest and greatest will still use some kind of powder exploding to propel some kind of metallic projectile out of a barrel. That hasn’t changed in 700 years, give or take.

    Once we developed the means to give 6 shots instead of 1, all subsequent developments were more in the realm of refinements than real improvements in function. And it’s hard to see how anything could be faster to load or more convenient to operate than our existing guns, which themselves haven’t changed much in a century. The 1911 was adopted 109 years ago. The 9mm cartridge was adopted in 1902, making it approximately 118 year old tech. The K frame hand ejector revolver has been on the scene for 120 years. All of them are little changed and work as well today as they did when new, and are still admired and used.
     
    fireside44, Mr. Mosin and ontarget like this.
  3. Mr. Mosin

    Mr. Mosin Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2019
    Messages:
    1,347
    Mmm. *If* we private citizens are still able to possess firearms... sure. They will be viewed as masterpieces.
     
  4. fireside44

    fireside44 member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,145
    I think the revolver market will come back around. A good revolver is like a Glock except with steel, style, and soul. I just want an accessory rail on a full underlug, a decent set of sights, and grips you can actually use with speedloaders.
     
    Heir Kommt Die Sonne likes this.
  5. kozak6

    kozak6 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Messages:
    1,315
    Location:
    Arizona
    I doubt it. We really can't imagine 100 years out.

    Think about Heinlein writing about flying spaceships by slide rule.
     
  6. Bill460

    Bill460 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2019
    Messages:
    254
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, Arizona
    I doubt this country will even exist in 100 years. Let alone allow gun ownership of any kind. If someone had told me back in 1970 when I graduated from high school, that by the time I retired I would see this country this completely screwed up, I would have laughed in their faces.... Yet here we are. Just 50 years ago when I turned 18, our government wanted to send me to Vietnam to kill communists. Today they want me to vote for them.

    After the Baby Boomer generation dies off, liberal socialist progressives will take over and destroy what's left of this nation. Even if Trump wins in November, he'll be gone as President on January 20, 2025. By then the progressives will outnumber traditional conservatives. They're almost there now.

    In another century, (assuming this country even exists anymore), you'll have to go to a museum to see a gun. As Ronald Regan said so eloquently, "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction". Boy was he ever right.
     
  7. Gary W. Strange

    Gary W. Strange Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2018
    Messages:
    246
    I have thought about this very thing. I see what we look at to day as classics, being the classics 100 years from now. What we look at are buying these classics for now, does not exist in what is being made now. These firearms were made during a time when there was hand fitting and finishing by true craftsman, that for the most part built one at a time. That will never be again unless it is a high end production firearm, Freedom Arms or the likes, or an all out custom. Starting in the 1950’s Ruger came about and really made the other firearm manufacturers have to cut back and make cheaper firearms, just to sell them. Ruger put the nails in the coffin of the Colt Woodsman. As they caused Smith and Wesson to cut conners with the dash behind the model number. Colt came out with the Trooper mark iii and had never made a firearm that way before. The firearm market changed along that time span, especially with revolvers. The firearms manufacturers had to change. It has went downhill from there. Twenty years ago you could go in the same gun shops you go in today and the racks and shelf’s were filled with walnut and steel, to day they are filled with aluminum, synthetic and polymer. They are all trying to make the cheapest firearm they can, that works. They are not bad guns and they do work, but the craftsmanship is gone. I don’t see these firearms being looked at the way the older Colts and Smith and Wesson’s are. You can take a Smith and Wesson revolver made in the fifties up until the nineties and put it beside what they are making now and it is not the same revolver. They are not the same. I had much rather buy older, good condition than anything new. In 100 years from now the classics we have today will be super classics and what is being made now will be junk.
     
  8. Rock185

    Rock185 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    994
    Location:
    Rim Country, Arizona
    IMHO, private ownership of firearms will be a thing long in the past for the citizens of 2120. Firearms will only be viewable in museums, behind unbreakable glass, plastic, force fields, or whatever they're using by then. Visitors will view and speak of them in hushed tones, as if speaking of something not morally or socially acceptable.

    Now I like firearms and their history. So I look at 100 year old guns as archaic, but historically interesting, artifacts of a bygone time. But I don't think public attitudes about firearms will resemble mine 100 years from now.......
     
  9. Heir Kommt Die Sonne

    Heir Kommt Die Sonne Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2018
    Messages:
    784
    Location:
    Texas
    The way I have seen it, it depends on the era that defines the 'classics'.
    Right now, we look at the mid-20th century and find nearly every firearm made in that era to be a work of art. And it's true, the 1950s -1980s, revolvers were immaculate, rifles had to be made with class or else they wouldn't sell, etc.
    But look at past decades. Like 1900-1930 era. Only a handful of guns from that period that we truly consider collectible. There are heaps of guns made during those years that you can find for under $200 bucks.
    Same with 1866-1899. There is definitely a catalog of 19th century arms that cost a decent fortune, but those are the tip of the iceberg of the various firearms that existed back then. Most of them weren't anything special, and have turned to a rusty finish all over and parts been misplaced the past century or so.

    It's the well made guns of each era that specifically become collectible. Mid 20th century we became spoiled and think that all guns become valuable when old, but that actually isn't so. Right now, I see the M9A3, Colt Cobra, Sig Legion series, and the competition rifles becoming the sought after collectibles in the future. I see something like the Glocks becoming a curiosity as well, only because right now 1st Gen Glocks are collectibles.
     
    Thibaut likes this.
  10. <*(((><

    <*(((>< Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2013
    Messages:
    2,747
    As one pulls out the modern day version of burbon out of the replicator, "The pictinny railed top, matched with the rare key-mod slots are a testament to the human workers operating the simple CNC tools at their disposal. I'm so happy I finally acquired the once maligned but rarer key-mod railed AR15 for my collection. I can just envision the manual labor involved of piecing together all the parts, if only we still had gunsmiths today of their caliber."
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2020
  11. Master Blaster

    Master Blaster Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    5,417
    Location:
    Delaware home of tax free shopping
    While you are plugged into skynet you will be able to imagine living in any era you wish.
    All firearms will be available for your use.
     
    adcoch1 likes this.
  12. Steve Milbocker

    Steve Milbocker Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2019
    Messages:
    421
    Location:
    Michigan
    Uberti building replica Glocks...:)
     
  13. LaneP

    LaneP Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    650
    LOL!
     
  14. Heir Kommt Die Sonne

    Heir Kommt Die Sonne Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2018
    Messages:
    784
    Location:
    Texas
    I do see Glocks definitely becoming a collectors/historians interest, because after all they replaced the 1911 in mass public/military use.


    Maybe this is how I talked myself into liking Glocks, I don't know... but if Gen 1s are worth $1000 now, our police Gen 3s are gonna become the next Rock Island Auction mag features.
     
  15. ancientnoob

    ancientnoob Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2017
    Messages:
    282
    I think the guns will be valuable but the true value will be if you have the gun and the ammunition for it. I suspect brass case will go by the wayside and replaced with disposable unreloadable polymer case, marking the end of the "sport." Slowly the ammunition will disappear or become cost prohibitive. Imagine, a collector just paid $1000 for 45 rds of .38 spl., almost a full box! I can see somehow ammunition becoming firearm specific meaning that the police in your town have only .26 caliber handguns. I dont have the confidence in the future generations. I believe guns and ammo will become taboo and treated like toxic waste. People call the police and they rush out to the house to secure a rusty 1911 like its unexploded WWII ordnance in Germany.
     
    Rock185 likes this.
  16. Reeferman

    Reeferman Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1,116
    That has been done many time’s in England and sadly here in Canada.
     
  17. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    7,580
    Said no one EVER
     
    walnut1704, ancientnoob and ontarget like this.
  18. ontarget

    ontarget Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    2,922
    Location:
    Michigan (Gods country)
    I certainly didn't mean for this thread to become sadly negative. I can only hope that future generations will see the absolute necessity of preserving the 2A.

    I believe there will be a lot more of the guns from today in working order 100 years from now than we have from 100 years ago. Few people leave their trusty S&W revolver on a shelf in the barn these days. Whether some of us are forced by local law to store our guns in a secure location or we do it by choice I feel like we probably take better care of them than they did in the past. So there should be more "survivors" from today.
    Just a thought.
     
  19. George P

    George P Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2018
    Messages:
    7,580
    You're making a big assumption - that 100 years from now the US as a nation will still exist as a Republic, and that civilians will be allowed to own guns.
     
    Bill460 likes this.
  20. ontarget

    ontarget Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    2,922
    Location:
    Michigan (Gods country)
    I can't believe all the "glass half empty" folks on this thread.
     
  21. Garandimal

    Garandimal member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2017
    Messages:
    2,899
    Location:
    Lee of Death Valley, ...where Tigers feed.
    How do people look at a fine Samurai Sword...?

    ...and someone who knows how to run one right.




    GR
     
  22. Hoppes Love Potion

    Hoppes Love Potion Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2010
    Messages:
    729
    Location:
    Florida
    I think a Model 27 will still be the pinnacle of craftsmanship in 100 years.
     
    ontarget likes this.
  23. Pudge

    Pudge Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2012
    Messages:
    583
    Location:
    Tioga County, PA
    As long as there are people who teach or learn Tap Rack Bang drills, revolvers will be serious weapons.
     
    Heir Kommt Die Sonne likes this.
  24. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    7,260
    Location:
    "Land of (dis)Enchantment"
    Same here.

    As I posted earlier, it is incumbent upon each and every one of us to make sure that this Republic remain intact.

    "A republic, if you can keep it." - Ben Franklin
     
  25. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2014
    Messages:
    11,270
    Location:
    Middle Tn
    So who will come out with the first K frame reproduction? Uberti? I’m interested in the fantasy guns... the stuff we want now and nobody makes. And I’m hoping they figure out a good solution to use bottlenecks in revolvers.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice