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1911 photos question

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by TexasPatriot.308, Sep 16, 2010.

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  1. TexasPatriot.308

    TexasPatriot.308 Member

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    I own a couple of 1911s, I carried one 38 years ago in the military, but I got a question. Why in most photos, are they shown obviously cocked with the hammer back? I remember the story of the old Texas Ranger that was asked if him carrying one like that was dangerous and his reply was "hell yeah, I wouldnt carry the SOB like that if it wasnt." it may be a dumb question or observation but it seems to be pretty common in most photo posts. Is there a reason for this? Even in the military we carried them without a round in the chamber til we got in the field.
     
  2. Quack

    Quack Member

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    because that's how we (civilians) carry them, but i know where you are coming from...

     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2010
  3. non2os13

    non2os13 Member

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    that is one less step to go through if you needed it in a hurry.
     
  4. BlayGlock

    BlayGlock Member

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    In photos? Because it looks cool.

    Pro Tip: When carrying a 1911 for personal protection, Condition 1 is the quickest and safest way to get you pistol into action should you need to use it.
     
  5. ScratchnDent

    ScratchnDent Member

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    Mine only get decocked when I pull the trigger. Any time you manipulate a 1911 to either chamber a round or clear it, it gets cocked, and it just seems an unnecessary and potentially dangerous step to lower the hammer manually.
     
  6. TexasPatriot.308

    TexasPatriot.308 Member

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    aint it more dangerous to have the hammer back? a lot of pistol owners are not trained or experienced in the safety aspects. seems like a good way to blow your toes off, shoot a hole in your groin or let a kid get a hold of it. I would rather be safe, take the time, sleeping with a cocked .45 next to your head, mix with a bad dream could be a mess.
     
  7. REAPER4206969

    REAPER4206969 Member

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    Yes, for your assailant. That's the point.

    That's their problem. I, and others here are.

    Good. Stupid should hurt. However, there are many stories of people shooting themselves, stuff or others by lowing the hammer to C2 than simply carrying C&L.

    And in that time your attacker will kill you.

    I've been doing it since I was 16. How is it any different from a Glock or Beretta or a revolver or any other firearm?
     
  8. TexasPatriot.308

    TexasPatriot.308 Member

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    have you ever been in combat? had flashbacks, wake up with a cocked pistol in your hand and dont know how or why? I doubt it.
     
  9. Lucky Derby

    Lucky Derby Member

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    There are two safe ways to carry a loaded 1911.
    1. Condition One. Loaded mag, loaded chamber, cocked hammer, safety on. This is the fastest way to safely carry a 1911.
    2. Condition Three. Loaded mag, EMPTY chamber, hammer down, safety off.
    This is slower to get the weapon into action and requires two hands, or an even slower one handed chambering technic, such as rear sight hooking your belt.
    Never, ever carry a loaded 1911 with a cocked hammer and the safety off or with a loaded chamber and a decocked hammer.
    The first one should be obvious, but with the second you are likely to slip when lowering the hammer and have a ND. It is also likely that something could hit the hammer while carring it and cause a ND.

    I understand that the military usually carried the 1911 in condition three.

    I however have never seen a LEO who was carrying either a 1911 or BHP carry it any way other than condition one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  10. mesinge2

    mesinge2 Member

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    Just to clarify I carry cocked-and-locked, but I thought this possibility was negated by a series 80 safety common on most factory new 1911s.

    Correct me if I am wrong?
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2010
  11. REAPER4206969

    REAPER4206969 Member

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    That's an issue that can not be solved on a firearms forum.
     
  12. REAPER4206969

    REAPER4206969 Member

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    Drop safeties are to prevent firing when dropped on the muzzle. The M1911 uses an inertial firing pin, so you could beat on the hammer all you want and it will not fire.
     
  13. cyclopsshooter

    cyclopsshooter Member

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  14. Zerodefect

    Zerodefect Member

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    My "cocked and Locked" 1911's are my safest pistols. Ironic, isn't it, that it gets such a scary rep?
     
  15. forindooruseonly

    forindooruseonly Member

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    Then the issue is not the gun, but the person suffering from PTSD. And in a flashback situation, I would expect the veteran to probably be able to manipulate whatever safeties and procedures to chamber a round and operate a gun. They were trained for it and relied upon that ability to survive.
     
  16. MaterDei

    MaterDei Member

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    As a civilian, when I'm carrying I'm 'in the field'.
     
  17. JTQ

    JTQ Member

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    I like safeties. You can't engage the safety on a 1911 unless the hammer is cocked.
     
  18. mesinge2

    mesinge2 Member

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    That's what I thought
     
  19. yeti

    yeti Member

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    They look more like they are smiling if photographed cocked and locked.
     
  20. gwnorth

    gwnorth Member

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    In your scenario, it would not make sense then to have any handgun actually loaded at hand then. Seriously, a 1911 loaded, chambered and safety on, versus waking up with a chambered Glock, or a decocked chambered DA/SA or a DA revolver would all be equally (or arguably more) dangerous. So you would have to keep any weapon separated from its ammunition to be safe under your described scenario.

    And by the time you wake up, load the gun, chamber a round and are ready to defend yourself, the intruder who is already in your house has put you out of action.
     
  21. The Lone Haranguer

    The Lone Haranguer Member

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    "Cocked and locked" - also popularly known as "Condition One" per Jeff Cooper - is the most efficient and safest way to carry a 1911 on your person for self defense. You carried chamber empty in the military because they told you to. They also tell sentries to patrol with unloaded weapons. Military combat ROE is much different from civilian armed self defense.
     
  22. Full Metal Jacket

    Full Metal Jacket member

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    hiding in your bushes
    :eek:
     
  23. Snowdog

    Snowdog Member

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    I've never been in combat, though I HAVE woken up with my nightstand pistol in my hand after a bizarre hypnagogic event many years ago. It's this precise reason I no longer keep a pistol within arm's reach when in bed. However, it's still within reach from the bed, just not from a laying position.

    For what it's worth, the pistol was a Kahr K9 (still my carry pistol) that's DAO and kept chambered. I honestly think it would have been just as easy if not easier for my to have fired that pistol than a 1911 in a condition 1 as the K9 has no manual safety to disengage whereas the 1911 does.
     
  24. gbran

    gbran Member

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    The 1911 decocker is a gambler.
     
  25. TexasPatriot.308

    TexasPatriot.308 Member

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    gw north and whoever, I am always ready for someone to come into my house, call it pranoia or experience, I will know when someone is trying to get in my house, I learned well how to fight, how to kill, how to know my enemy, and I will have plenty of time to chamber a round. I saw and have seen several pics of auto pistols with the hammer back and safety off. one was in guns and ammo last month, a Kimber I think. because of my political beliefs and membership in the Texas Minutemen, I am always a target and always ready, (by the way, dental floss is great for booby traps). hard to lecture a 57 year old Viet Nam combat vet on how to carry a 1911.
     
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