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3-d printing

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by luger, Mar 3, 2013.

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  1. luger

    luger Member

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    HAVE ANY FIREARMS BEEN MADE USING 3-D PRINTING?
    And what about nicro-mesh technology?
     
  2. blarby

    blarby Member

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    Ar lowers have been made, publicly.

    You still need a metal bbl, firing pin, receiverish parts, and a few others.

    Think about a glock. Thats about as much polymer as you can get away with.

    There is some promising work on magazines, as well. Still need metal springs.
     
  3. Arp32

    Arp32 Member

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    Only parts. Can't affordably print a barrel. Yet.
     
  4. JoePfeiffer

    JoePfeiffer Member

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    What's that?
     
  5. Arp32

    Arp32 Member

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    You actually can 3D print metal, it's just not in the same cost galaxy as ABS or gypsum based 3D printing. A friend of mine works for a company that is testing 3D printed titanium. Allegedly possible, very expensive. This year.

    Once the very smart computers join forces with the metal 3D printers, we humans are doomed. Self replicating everything.
     
  6. C0untZer0

    C0untZer0 Member

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    It's really not that hard to do with steel either.

    I respect Karl Ronrbaugh and Arne Boberg - but do people think these guys are like Einstien or something? How about the guys who make custom match grade barrels ? It's not that hard to do...

    Creating guns is easier than creating methamphetamine. The technology for one of the most popular designs - the 1911, is obviously over 100 years old..

    A modern multi-function metal working setup can make perfectly servicable guns out of steel, and it would already be profitable given street prices - it's just not profitable ENOUGH to incent people to do it yet. But a ban would drive prices up and make it worth while for criminals to open up shops and start cranking out guns.

    Firearms can be made today right now with the metal working technology that is already avalable for roughly the cost of the high-end 3-D printers.

    One thing anti-gunners all have in common is that they are completely ignorant about economics.

    http://www.engineeringtv.com/video/EOS-Laser-Sintering-Technology

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6Px6RSL9Ac
     
  7. mrvco

    mrvco Member

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    There are companies printing production high-end bicycle parts out of titanium. I imagine it is only a matter of time (and money) before someone starts prototyping metal gun parts and testing them.
     
  8. bigfatdave

    bigfatdave Member

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    look up "defense distributed", "DEFCAD", and "wiki weapon" for starters
     
  9. The_Armed_Therapist

    The_Armed_Therapist Member

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    3D printing, like most technological advances, decreases the "necessity" of the State, and encourages undermining it. Bring it on, 3D printing! It'll probably be banned, though. The State must fight to survive.
     
  10. nelsonal

    nelsonal Member

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    It depends on what you mean by "Firearm" legally an AR-15 lower receiver is least reducable part of the firearm, and those have been printed. No one is attempting to print barrels, bolts, or bolt carriers or the other high stress parts, as far as I know, because they're not conducive to the current materials available (but in normal times they can easily be obtained).
     
  11. barnbwt

    barnbwt Member

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    Though not quite as plug and play as they'd have you believe, it is infinitely easier to get set up printing (and takes far less space) than it is to get the stuff for a working machine shop (mill, lathe, press, brake, accessories, stock, high-power electrical hookups), as well as much more undetectable. It may be shocking to hear, but many folks are hesitant to let their neighbors know they are making or working on guns (reasons depend on locale), and 3D printing offers a quiet, compact, relatively easy method to synthesize components.

    IF 3D printing ever becomes remotely as capable as metal-working (or if the designs can be made to work around material deficiencies) I'd be an idiot to not use it. Time will tell...

    TCB
     
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