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Advice: Yes or No on this Marlin 1984 .44 @ $380

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by MrPeter, Aug 17, 2010.

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  1. MrPeter

    MrPeter Member

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    I stopped by a shop today at lunch and saw a 1984 Marlin in .44. I've been looking for one and asked if they would take $380, since it was used. After going in the back and asking the manager, the friendly counterperson told me it was my lucky day, and that they would take $380. It was marked $450. Here's what I found out about it upon closer inspection:

    Marlin 1984 in .44 Mag
    20" Barrel
    Crossbolt Safety
    Tight lockup
    wooden furniture in respectable condition
    front forend is slightly loose
    action has normal wear, as does chamber and boltface
    trigger is crisp
    Bluing at 80-90%

    The only problem I see with this is that the bore looks worn. Very worn. The bore is bright and shiny with no pitting, and the whole thing looks well taken care of. My concern is that it might have that microgroove rifling, or just has no rifling left. This is important to me, since I'll be shooting it with factory cast lead exclusively.

    I've been holding out for one of them Marlin SS octagonal barrels, but I thought $380 might be a good enough deal to bite the bullet, so to say. So this is where I need the advice: Is it a good price for this rifle? Should I do it despite the rifling and take a risk that it'll shoot as straight as a banana?

    I told the feller I'd be back after work to take another look with cash. I can still back out. Also it comes with a rail on top of the receiver that allows a view of the sights.

    Thanks.
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    It has micro-groove rifling then.

    It would be impossible to wear cut Ballard style rifling clear out of an 1894 Marlin .44 Mag barrel no matter how much it has been shot.

    rc
     
  3. MrPeter

    MrPeter Member

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    So then I should pass. My understanding is that microgroove rifling does not like lead cast bullets.
     
  4. broken

    broken Member

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    i have been wanting a 44 mag lever so bad ,but cant shell out 400.00 to 700.00 they are asking,so i picked up me a nice 1980 marlin 336 30/30 for 200.00 with a box of core loct 150"s thrown in on the deal.,i"m happy for half the price. dont sound like a bad price on that .44.if the bore check"s out.
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Micro-groove rifling can be made to shoot very well with hard-cast bullet handloads.

    But you are not likely to find them in factory lead bullet ammo.
    Most of it is going to be soft swaged lead.

    rc
     
  6. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    A 1984 manufactured Marlin 1894 in .44 Rem magnum should have a microgroove rifled barrel and it should say so on the barrel. The microgoove rifling was used in model 1894s until the late 1990s. My 1894 (made in 1971)was very accurate with cast bullets BUT I had trouble with lead shavings binding up the works. Problem solved when I went to jacketed ammo exclusively.
     
  7. airdale

    airdale Member

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  8. paintballdude902

    paintballdude902 Member

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    id do it. i plan on picking one up in .45 long colt
     
  9. MrPeter

    MrPeter Member

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    All you folks saying I should do it: Did you read the part about the microgrooves and the fact that I will ONLY be shooting lead out of this puppy? Even if it's not microgrooved barrel, it's really worn. How would I have the rifling fixed on it? Would it shoot straight anyway?
     
  10. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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    If you don't want it don't buy it.
    Only shooting it will tell you that.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2010
  11. ar24095

    ar24095 Member

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    If you buy it slug the barrel and find out the diameter of the rifling's and size your bullet or boolits as we casters like to call them and see how they shoot. I have an RD265 mold that my 1894 loves but mine has ballard style rifling.

    The only thing is mine will not shoot heavier bullets in any kind of a group and actually key hole at 100 yards that is the only draw back I see to the Marlin is the barrel twist rate is to slow.
     
  12. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    OK, so don't buy it. And the only way to repair the thing will be to replace the barrel.
     
  13. MrPeter

    MrPeter Member

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    OK, so I went back to the shop and looked at the rifle again. It is NOT a microgrooved barrel. The guy who was there this time took a look and said it seems like there is almost no wear, and the grooves on this barrel aren't as deep as the ones in my .44 revolver because the revolver needs deeper grooves for a shorter barrel. Honestly, I'm not that experienced in telling the difference between worn rifling and not, but he's also a salesman for that store, so I'm not sure if he's biased.

    He did say though that this gun is not recommended to shoot with soft lead-cast bullets. I have 1000's of bullets already purchased, but I'm not sure if they're hard-cast or not. I'll check, and bring them in. Apparently there's an easy way to check if they are by pressing your fingernail on them.

    Thanks for your input folks.
     
  14. ar24095

    ar24095 Member

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    A properly sized and lubed bullet loaded for the correct velocity for the hardness of the lead will be fine in the gun. You just dont want to shoot a lead bullet with say a bhn of 12 at 1200 fps it would lead your barrel. I use straight wheel weight's and water quench my bullets and end up with a bhn of around 18-20 and use a gas check design mold and have pushed them very fast with minimal leading. Hope this helps.
     
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