Aquarium tubing for caps

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Has anyone tried cutting aquarium tubing to fit over a percussion cap to keep them from fragmenting on a revolver?
 
Not yet, only to put them on the nipples...

I think cutting tubes only for this use is a big waste of time when a simple movement of the hand is sufficient to remove the old caps fragmented ...
Maybe for other people but for me it is irrelevant and may cause bad ignitions if the tube is too long ....

I only use one tube: my blow tube but not for caps... ;)
 
It would be a real pain to remove the little rings of plastic if they didn't blow off anyway.

As Erwan suggests I've found that a tilt of the hand towards the right while cocking the gun allows most of the shards to fall away cleanly.
 
Actually, it works quite nicely. I don't do it for that reason, though. I use the tubing as a means of making sure things are waterproof. I had a thread about it somewhere ages ago, and I even did a test of putting the gun in the shower. I guess not having as many fragments (it doesn't totally eliminate it) is a side benefit. The little rings of plastic aren't hard to deal with.
 
It works OK. Keeps the cap on for long term storage. Don't make it too long though. It does make the fired cap harder to remove.
 
The Aquarium Tubing cap guards work great. They protect against moisture contamination of powder during storage and also prevent cap jams. They get very dirty when used but can be reused. The only problem is the amount of effort required to remove them after use. Because of this I don't use them for casual range use but do use them for long-term storage of loaded cylinders.

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New Aquarium Tubing cap guards

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Fired cap guards
 
makes me wonder where our fore fathers found their aquarium tubing...when fighting the civil war/indians/cattle rustlers/bankrobbers/gunslingers/in the rain.
 
Caps used to be made of a little stiffer material, back in the 19th century. In the 20th century, caps were made as an afterthought to satisfy a small percentage of folks who continued to use percussion ignition on long guns and hand guns. While it may be a lot of fun to cut tubing and such, properly fitted caps go a long way to preventing problems. However, the simple installation of a cap post, between the hammer and the cone, is also a quick and simple measure to prevent cap jams.

Kevin
 
I agree with Kevin! Install a cap post and you won't be cutting up tubing. The caps themselves should seal the charge and a post will keep your action clean.

Mike
www.goonsgunworks.com
 
makes me wonder where our fore fathers found their aquarium tubing...when fighting the civil war/indians/cattle rustlers/bankrobbers/gunslingers/in the rain.


Caps used to be made of a little stiffer material, back in the 19th century. In the 20th century, caps were made as an afterthought to satisfy a small percentage of folks who continued to use percussion ignition on long guns and hand guns. While it may be a lot of fun to cut tubing and such, properly fitted caps go a long way to preventing problems. However, the simple installation of a cap post, between the hammer and the cone, is also a quick and simple measure to prevent cap jams.

^ ^ This.

They actually used to make caps specifically for different guns to alleviate the fragment problem. I've quoted a letter here before from the Civil War period discussing it.

Too bad nobody today will step up and make caps for revolvers that dont break up. The post modification seems like a good idea though.
 
JB Weld and hammer notch

A guy on YouTube swears by the practice of filling in the hammer (nose) notch with JB Weld and smoothing it down flush with sandpaper when dry.
According to him. the hammer notch pulls the spent caps back and tend to fall down into the space between the hammer and frame. The down side is you can no longer rest the hammer properly on the safety pins on Colt models.
 
Bluhawk,
There's another guy on YouTube that fans a '51 Navy and a 3rd Mod. Dragoon!! Both have cap post and for many folks, its the first time they've ever seen a cap and ball revolver fanned! Both videos are on my website. (Thanks to Brushhippie for the vids!!)
BTW, you can still use the safety pins.

I guess . . . . take your pick as far as what guy to listen to on YouTube!

Mike
www.goonsgunworks.com
 
Back when percussion caps were in short supply, I used aquarium tubing (1/4" od x .170" id) to secure pistol primers to the top of the nipple. Not the best idea, but it did work. It worked best with my 1858 New Model Army Piettas.

Never would have thought of that, good idea!
 
I'll be damned. That actually worked. I'm even more ready for the pockylips now
 
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