Assemble or disassemble for parkerizing.

Bcwitt

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2020
Messages
1,680
Location
Pennsylvania
Dose parkerizing cause issues if press fit parts are disassembled first? Seems like the process would be easier in pieces then in one long piece. Subject is an AK type rifle. The barrel could be pressed out, if desired. Thanks
 
It's best to park with tightly pressed parts like barrels left in place.
If you park separately you'd have to remove the park from the barrel shank and trunion because the park coating will prevent it from being assembled.

I'd remove only the parts that can be easily removed, like the rear sight leaf, sight spring, etc.
 
It's best to park with tightly pressed parts like barrels left in place.
If you park separately you'd have to remove the park from the barrel shank and trunion because the park coating will prevent it from being assembled.

I'd remove only the parts that can be easily removed, like the rear sight leaf, sight spring, etc.
I was hoping to make a smaller park tank. Perhaps 18" instead of 28" or so. I have the solution, but no other equipment. I'll have to fabricate a tank. I think aluminum would be best. Mabey barrel pressed out & the rest of the population left on barrel? If I have to krocus the barrel & trunion I will.
 
Parkerize it with the barrel pressed in. It's not worth the hassle head spacing and pinning again.
I had a stainless tank made 15+ years ago by a local sheet metal shop. It's 36x8x8. I've done a M1 Carbine and one AK. Both came out pretty good.
 
Thanks! Much support favoring the stainless tank. I have a capacity to do that, but aluminum would be easier for me to do. But if there is an advantage to a stainless tank, I won't hesitate to do it that way. Does the aluminum have a negative effect on the process or bad for the solution? I can sure build a stainless one.
 
Parkerize it with the barrel pressed in. It's not worth the hassle head spacing and pinning again.
I had a stainless tank made 15+ years ago by a local sheet metal shop. It's 36x8x8. I've done a M1 Carbine and one AK. Both came out pretty good.
How much solution does that setup use? I have 1 gallon. I have a barrel press & the pin is already located. I'd rather not get more compound.
 
I hate to ask, but why stainless over aluminum?
The phosphoric acid in the Parkerizing solution will eat the aluminum. The tank won't fail the first, second, or 20th timme you use it for that, but you don't want the disolved aluminum in the mix with the Park getting deposited on your gun. No one knows what effect that will have on the finish and no need to risk it. The acid does not react in any significant way with the stainless steel.
Regular carbon steel will get Parkerized along with the objuct you intend to finish, wasting solution that could otherwise be used to do more guns.
 
How much solution does that setup use? I have 1 gallon. I have a barrel press & the pin is already located. I'd rather not get more compound.
If memory serves me I think I used 2-3 gallons of distilled water. It's been few years. I heated it up in my garage with my camp stove.
 
Parkerizing is a very easy process to do. But it is important not to skip or cut corners. You want the tank to be "non-reactive." In the case of using any gun metal finish, that is stainless steel. Here is a good, short video from the wizards at Brownells.


I have used Park solutions from several different makers. So far, my favorite recipe is the solution from Allegheny Arsenal. Their solution seems a pit more concentrated as one pint to 4 gallons of distilled water Parked two rifles without issue. I probably could have done a few more projects but didn't have any lined up.

 
I have used an old Pyrex dish that my wife was going to throw out to do a small batch of parts. So heat safe glass will work, too. The problem will be finding one large/deep enough to do anything but small batches. If you decide to try a Pyrex type dish don't use your wife's without permission or you might find yourself strangled with your separtated manhood. Safest bet - stick to stainless. Brownells sells various size tanks from small to large made for that. Midway might, too. Ot go by a restaurant supply store and check out their buffet serving pans.

In addition to a proper container you will get best result with something to act as a heat diffuser between the pan and the heat source or you will likely run into uneven heating and risk ruining the solution. Sort of the Parkerizing version of a double boiler type setup.
 
Back
Top