Beretta 87 or Smith-Wesson 41?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by socalbeachbum, Mar 4, 2016.

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  1. socalbeachbum

    socalbeachbum Member

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    anyone here who can comment on the Beretta 87 TARGET model, 6 inch ?

    I've owned a 41 and loved it and am considering a new Buckmark, or the 41, or possibly this Beretta 87 TARGET as a fun range pistol.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2016
  2. Mike OTDP

    Mike OTDP Member

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    Depends on what you want it for. I've got an 87, it's a nice piece if you want a high-quality .22LR pocket pistol. Goes great with a suppressor. But it's not a target pistol like a Model 41.
     
  3. socalbeachbum

    socalbeachbum Member

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    87 TARGET model Beretta

    sorry, I see there is an 87 Cheetah but I was asking about the find looking 87 Target model
     
  4. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    I have both.

    Totally different animals!

    My 2 41's are target pieces. They don't like high speed ammo, they don't like cheap ammo. They don't like to be abused in any way. They are exceptionally accurate and reliable. Dang fun to shoot also.

    My 87t is a fun gun to shoot. Super fun. It is actually my third highest round count gun because well, its just fun to shoot. I put a red dot on it, and where the dot is, the bullet hits. Did I say it was just fun? It eats anything. It ejects anything including range pickups. It likes cheap ammo. Reliable, reliable reliable. What it does not have is a target quality trigger. I have thought about taking it over to Alex Hamilton over in San Antonio and have him work over the trigger. The problem with it is it is heavy, lots of lead in and then no resistance after the break. It is really hard gun to shoot exceptional targets with. But if you want to plink! Its Fun!

    So, what do you want? Bullseye piece or an expensive high quality plinker?

    Compared to a Ruger MK series I would take my 87T any day (and usually do).

    41s_v2.jpg
    41_target2.jpg
    87t_020406.jpg
     
  5. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    For target shooting, the Model 41. For any other kind of shooting where a quality .22 pistol is desired, the Model 41. :)
     
  6. Pipe Smoker

    Pipe Smoker Member

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    I've only had my 87T for a month, but I'm definitely in love with it, despite its somewhat quirky trigger. I especially love its external hammer – unique among mid-tier .22 target pistols, AFAIK. Its Weaver rail is just begging for an OKO red dot … I don't have a 41 to compare it with though.

    Beretta's literature says its barrel length is 5.9", but the barrel on mine is 5.5".
     
  7. Deanimator

    Deanimator Member

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    I learned to shoot handguns on Model 41s in college.

    While I prefer High Standards, I'd definitely go with the S&W over the Beretta for any serious target shooting.
     
  8. Saleen322

    Saleen322 Member

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    The 87 is accurate but the trigger is lacking if you want a target pistol. The Ruger MK II has a better trigger. For about the same money you can buy a new High Standard and they are the best target pistol made in the US. If you want something better than the High Standard, you are looking European.
     
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