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Best way to hold grips for applying tung oil?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by Mictlanero, Jan 10, 2013.

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  1. Mictlanero

    Mictlanero Member

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    I want to apply tung oil to a refinished 1 piece revolver grip - what is the best way to suspend it or hold it for application and drying?

    Thanks
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I would use a piece of small stovepipe wire twisted tightly in the inleting of the backstrap groove.

    Twist a loop in the other end to hang it up on a nail for drying.

    I keep a roll of black iron stovepipe wire in the shop for just such uses.

    rc
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  3. beag_nut

    beag_nut Member

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    Wear disposable protective gloves. Hold the grip in your hands while you liberally apply the tung oil. Wait five minutes, then remove ALL the excess tung oil with paper towels. Place the grip in a warm place to allow the oil to cure/oxygen polymerize, for at least 48 hours. Soak the paper towels in water for 24 hours, then dispose (extremely important to prevent a fire!).
    By the way, tung oil is not superior to any other finish EXCEPT that it won't radically change the original color of the wood. Otherwise, there are many other finishes which are superior, including "Min-Wax rub-on finish", which I used for 15 years in my furniture company, before retiring. Tung oil has an undeserved reputation for durability (at least compared to modern finishes). It is very easy to repair after damage, however.
     
  4. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    So is good old Tru-Oil stock finish!

    rc
     
  5. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Member

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    +1 I love that stuff.

    Ron
     
  6. Mictlanero

    Mictlanero Member

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    Thanks for the advice!
     
  7. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    I used a piece of wood about 6" long, with one end sized to fit into the front slot. Then I clamped the other end in the vise. That allowed me to swab, spray or whatever I wanted to do.

    Jim
     
  8. beag_nut

    beag_nut Member

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    Just for reference:
    Tru-Oil is both a "modified oil" (their words) and linseed oil. Linseed oil will darken the wood it is applied to. Linseed oil has no special fame as being resistant to moisture and light. If that is not one's concerns, then use it. Believe it or not, their have been advances in oil finishes for wood, since linseed oil.
     
  9. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    You mean it darkens wood like this?

    1950SW.jpg

    Myhomemadepistol3.jpg

    BuckSet3619x640.jpg


    Tru-Oil may be linseed based.

    But the final result is nothing like linseed oil, doesn't darken the finish, and is a very good, long lasting, waterproof stock finish.

    I have used it since 1962 with nothing but very good results.

    rc
     
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