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Browning A Bolt II 7mm rem mag

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by scheaman88, Nov 10, 2012.

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  1. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    Ok so im looking at multiple rifles right now and trying to decide what i want one of them is the 7mm rem mag.

    I want to be able to reload this cartridge but also want to be able to purchase ammo farely easy for it too in those times when i just have anything loaded and just want to go shoot or any other situation that may arise.

    Anyone who owns one of these or has owned one and has input both good and bad i would love to hear from you and i appreciate what you have to say.

    Lastly i would like for my wife to be able to shoot the rifle i purchase but i want to go and shoot deer, elk, or any other large game that i may end up hunting down the road. this is a rifle i want to own for years to come and hopefully pass it on to my children.
     
  2. beatledog7

    beatledog7 Member

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    Sgt,

    My 7mm Rem Mag is an older (1986) first edition A-Bolt Medallion. The A-Bolt is accurate, smooth to operate, and just darn pretty. I really like the 60-degree bolt lift. It makes mounting a scope nice and low much easier. Both the Browning and the 7Mag are great choices.

    7Mag ammo is not rare and can be had at most Walmarts. It's reasonably priced, available from on-line outlets for a buck a round (or more, but it starts there). It is as easy to reload as any other bottleneck rifle cartridge and can shoot bullet weights from 120 to 180 grains. Its recoil is manageable as long as you don't plan to shoot 50 rounds at a time (I've shot 20 or so in a single outing with no ill effects), and you can load it light if you need to. There's nothing in the lower 48 that it can't humanely kill.

    Anything bad I could say about the 7Mag would pretty much apply to the 30-06, 270, etc. The only possible down on the A-Bolt is it's a bit more expensive than a comparable Savage, Ruger, etc. But there are barely used A-Bolts for sale all the time on Gunbroker and similar sites. A well cared-for A-Bolt will still be going strong for your children to hand down to theirs.
     
  3. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    Thanks beatle dog for the input i am highly considering the 7mm rem mag as my weapon of choice.
     
  4. C-grunt

    C-grunt Member

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    I've owned a few 7mm Mags and I e liked them all. Never owned a downing though. I think the 7 Mag is a great all-rounder that has moderate recoil.
     
  5. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    I own an A-Bolt II in 7mm-08 and have owned three 7mm Rem mags over the years. The Browning is a decent rifle, not up to par with it's Winchester 70 counterpart, but not bad either. Love the flip down mag and very short LOP but I am not thrilled with the ejector (weaker then lite beer) or the rough action. I have not spent a ton of time developing handloads for mine yet but I can tell you that it is harder to get it to group sub moa then some of my other rifles. Tikka tops my all around rifle list, affordable, smoothest action in the buisness, best trigger of any production rifle, and just plain deadly accurate with a wide variety of bullet weights.
    We all know the big 7 is a great long ranged gun, but if I could have just one hunting rifle the 7mm Rem Mag would NOT be it, 30-06, 270 win, 308, 7mm-08 and 6.5x55 (if you handload) are really hard to beat at real world ranges, and are better "all around" cartrages. Despite not reaching 3400fps speeds they still kill large game as quickly as they ever did.
    I would never recommend a 7mm Rem Mag to a novice shooter, their recoil can be really snappy and unpleasant.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  6. hardluk1

    hardluk1 member

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    I to have used a 7mm rm for close to 20 years and like it but if buying a first just one centerfire rifle today it would not be a 7mm mag. Not the best choice for a new be shooter. If your shooting mainly at a range, buy a 260, 6.5x55 followed by a 7-08 or 308 and enjoy shooting out as far as 600 to a 1000 yards The 6.5mms are better there. There 308 based rounds are still great hunting cartidges out to 350 yards or so . Unless your wife is a tough lady she may not think highly of a lighter weight 7mm mag.

    7mm rm brass has a shorter reloading life than a non mag too. 4 to 6 reloads maybe. Buy a 308 based cartidge and it can hold up to 3 or 4 times as many reloads.

    To day if buying a new rifle it would be a 6.5mm, 260 or 6.5x55.
     
  7. Sav .250

    Sav .250 Member

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    The 7 mm Mag is a load. It does have re-coil. letting your wife shoot it is another thing.
    It "could " have a negative affect on her in the long run.
    Although if there is a "low re-coil" out there , that might save the day. J s/n.
     
  8. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    Thank you guys for all of that input and now i have something else to fuel this discussion. How about the .300 Win Mag? I plan on reloading and have been told this one can be downloaded and uploaded for the situation of use. for example downloaded for the range day when my wife wants to shoot it so its not punishing(sp) her or uploaded for going on those big game hunts up in the mountains. what are your thoughts in this aspect of the 300 win mag?
     
  9. Random Discharge

    Random Discharge Member

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    I sense you want a magnum for your first all around rifle. :D

    If a magnum it is, stick with the Rem 7 Mag. There is nothing marginal about the Rem 7 Mag. Re-read Kachok's post. These are the same reasons the last thing I would recommend is stepping even further up the power scale to a 300 Win Mag. If you have a preference for more power than a 308 based cartridge offers, I recommend taking another hard look at the 270 and 30-06 before you go down the magnum road.
     
  10. Flatbush Harry

    Flatbush Harry Member

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    In my experience, a 7mm RM has about the same recoil as a .30-06 and, while I don't own one, I think it is a fine choice. I find the .300 WM unpleasant to shoot and, hence, to practice with. I also don't have one of them, as I can't afford the kid I'd have to rent to shoot it for me. Also, in my experience, at less than 300-350 yards, a .300 WM doesn't do anything that a .308 Win or .30-06 won't do with far less recoil.

    I shoot regularly (>12x/mo) and see a lot of 7RM and .300WM shooters, struggling with these rifles. Most comment on the recoil they're experiencing and I note that most have poor positions and technique. I believe many get these calibers because someone said to them that:

    a. they are "flat-shooting" so that holdover issues are eliminated (uh-uh)
    b. the mags will stop anything regardless of where the game is struck (uh-uh)

    My go-to hunting rifles are .30-06, .308, .270 and 6.5x55 SE. With the right bullets, all will take any game in North America save for Brown Bear and Moose. If I ever go after those two, I would take my .375 H&H. BTW, with a 260gr AccuBond at 2700 fps, the .375 has virtually the same ballistics as a .30-06 with 180gr bullets...but you need to learn the relevant holdovers for both.

    Net, net, buy a rifle for most of what you need. You'll enjoy it more, practice more and probably achieve greater success. Buying a .300WM for the one shot you might (but probably shouldn't) take at 450 yards on an 800 lb animal isn't good decision-making. Buying a 7mmRM or .300WM for 1,00 yard target shooting is not a bad idea, but then, you'll want to get the proper rifle for that discipline.

    FH
     
  11. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    All great points but i will put this out there also i am a sgt in the military and as far as shooting goes all i do is technique. I have my shooting abilities down and i know what i am capable of.

    Secondly the recoil is not something i am a stranger too either. And when it comes to reletless practice to make something perfect i can endur the discomfort long enough to get it right until i cant get it wrong.

    Also please dont take this as me being cocky or arrogant. I greatly appreciate all of your input and will consider all factors and weapons that are put forth.

    Im looking for those larger caliber magnums because i dont make insane amounts of money that allow me to buy a rifle for every different hunting situation that there is. That being sad i want something that i know can handle the large game animals as well as be downloaded for the medium game even if it is still a little over kill.
     
  12. C-grunt

    C-grunt Member

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    7 RM will take any animal in North America. If you want lighter loads you can reload your own or buy the less recoil loads. Remember that the 7mm Mauser ( same bullet weights but a few hundred FPS slower) was used in Africa by Mr Bell to kill dozens of elephants.
     
  13. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Member

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    Mine happens to be a Ruger 77 I have had maybe 20 years. I like the cartridge and it is, as mentioned, suitable for all North American game and a flat shooting cartridge as well.

    While many say the recoil is on par with a 30-06 I find it to be a little more stout. Here is what I suggest you do if at all possible. Beg or borrow a 30-06 bolt gun and have your wife send a few rounds down range. Before investing in a 7mm Remington Magnum you really should see how she fares with a 30-06. It is important she be comfortable shooting the rifle and not flinching and getting beat up by the rifle. Try before you buy is a good way to go with rifles like the 7mm Rem Mag or .300 Win Mag as both are a little more stout than the 30-06 in my opinion. I only suggest the 30-06 as they are easy to find and borrow. :)

    Just My Take
    Ron
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  14. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    ok to the queen of battle sorry c-grunt i had to throw that in there. I plan on reloading for whichever rifle i decide to buy for the exact reason you stated i can make lighter loads for the range to have some fun with and upload for hunting.

    Ron, I am hoping that i can borrow or rent a few different rifles to shoot them and see how i fare with them and make my decision on the terms of which i feel would be the most manageable.

    And in the end if it turns out that my wife cant shoot it then well thats ok cause she already stole my XDM 40S&W so she cant shoot that while i shoot the big boy.
     
  15. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    I never understood how anyone could believe that the 30-06 kicks as hard as the 7 mag. They are not even close in my book, I can shoot 100+ rounds of 06 in several different rifles without flinching, that is a long way from being pleasant but it is not punishing either. I never could make it through a whole box of my 7mm Rem Mags, they don't push any harder but that snappy recoil stings on the bench (not so much in the field though)
    I have since dropped the 7mm mags and now I shoot a 270 WSM when I get an itch for crazy speed, it is kind of surprising but the 270 has a bit less bite to it and the trajector/energy are darn near identical. Only gripe I have with the short mag is the brass is thick and hard as heck to FL resize. As good a performer as that WSM is I have only taken it hunting twice, nothing wrong with it, it won't do anything my 308 or 6.5x55 can't do at any realistic range.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2012
  16. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    Steering towards the 300 win mag

    Ok so i have done a pretty good deal of comparing on my 12 hour shifts that im working/being bored right now and I have come to the conclusion that i like the .300 Win Mag. It is the only .30 caliber rifle that is in the top ten most bought rifles and seems to be the most versatile for buying rounds in the store and for reloading. I know it still has a kick to it but there are things i can do to tame the kick for extended range time and sighting in. I however have not come down to a conclusion as to which manufacturer i would like to purchase this weapon from. i have a top six in mind and will list it here for commenting and am also as usual open to any other brand suggestions that you guys may have.

    Ok so heres the list eight rifles six makers:

    Weatherby Vangaurd S2

    T/C Dimension

    T/C Venture

    T/C Icon W/ Weathershield

    Remington 700 SPS

    Tikka T3 Lite

    Ruger M77 Hawkeye

    Browning A Bolt II Long Range Hunter

    These are not in any order of what i like just wrote them down as i found what i liked.
     
  17. Andrew Leigh

    Andrew Leigh Member

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    Hi

    Have shot my brothers Winchester Model 70 pre-64 in 7mm Rem Mag and the snappier recoil does make it a little more unpleasant and agree 100% with Kachok. It is a great caliber (aren't all calibers great?)

    Have shot my friends Mossberg .300 Win Mag and it has less recoil than my 30-06 ........ but it has a muzzle break. They guys on the range will hate you due to the noise and the side blast.

    The Tikka is light weight so will exacerbate the felt recoil.

    Have not shot any of the others. Both my rifles are CZ's.
     
  18. jehu

    jehu Member

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    The heavier the rifle the less recoil will be felt, generaly speaking, so if you are going to be shooting mostly from a good rested position I would not get the "lite" rifles in the magnum loads. If you are walking and stalking then thats a differant story. I have a Sako Grey Wolf in 7RM and the recoil is not bad at all shooting the Federal 150gr Ballistic Tips. The Sako Grey Wolf is just short of 8lbs. + scope/ mounts.
     
  19. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    Here is my take on the rifles you listed.
    Weatherby Vanguard
    Pros: Tough as nails action with a well eared reputation for accuracy.
    Cons: The stock always threw me off, too bulky, and the wby is not a light rifle,
    TC Dimension
    Pros: Very modular rifle, quick change caliber setup that the wife would enjoy (she WON'T like the 300 Win)
    Cons: New barrels cost as much as a new Savage Rifle, that is why I never owned a TC and bought half a dozen Savages :)
    TC Venture
    Pros: A worthy rival to the Vanguard for budget sporter supremacy, with a better stock IMHO.
    Cons: A recall issue that turned some people off, and at 7.5lbs it has to play with the big boys.
    Remington SPS
    Pros: They used to build a fine rifle.
    Cons: They don't anymore :( The last three Remingtons I have purchased were all junk and I won't ever touch another one post 2007 when they sold their soul to CCM/FG
    Tikka T3
    Pros: Easily the most refined rifle you can get under $1500, fantastic rifle my all time favorite budget rifle (and I have owned a BUNCH) 6.25lbs, unreal accuracy, best trigger and smoothest action in the industry, what more could you ask for?
    Cons: Recoil pad is a bit on the stiff side, and the rifle is a bit light for 300 Win Mag recoil, a heavier rifle helps soak up some of that kick.
    TC Icon
    Pros: A world beater sporter weight rifle designed to play with the best of the best, solid performance in every test I have seen it. (Never owned one myself)
    Cons: Expensive, almost Sako money.
    Ruger 77 Hawkeye.
    Pros: It is the tank of all bolt action rifles, will outlast you and your grandchildren.
    Cons: Heavy, and some accuracy issues.
    Browning A-Bolt II LRH
    Pros: Good looking accurate rifle, and you get to put those cool Browning logos on your truck :)
    Cons: while the heavy barrel LRH is a highly accurate heavy barrel rifle it is also far to heavy to stalk hunt with.

    If you are dead set on getting a large heavy 300 mag consider investing in a good 308/270 or some other quality mid range caliber in a smaller more handy package for woods hunting. I think you will find you leave the cannon at the house more often then not, I sure do.
     
  20. del4

    del4 Member

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    I figured that .308 & 30-06 would have made the top 10 over 300wm.

    It looks like your mind is made up. Get the rifle you want, you will likely regret it if you don't.

    I agree with the others though, there are better choices for your situation. Just take your time with your decision, the rifles you want are expensive. There are a lot of used 300,s & 7mm's for a reason.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I997 using Tapatalk 2
     
  21. scheaman88

    scheaman88 Member

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    Kachok, All i can say is wow that is the absolute most informative post i have ready on any thread. I did hear about the remingtons having issues just threw it out there to see if anyone else had any of the issues. you answered my question thanks.

    Now another thing since everyone says how high the recoil is how does everyone feel about the limbsaver recoild pad and a decent muzzel break? How much will they impact my recoil and will either effect my accuracy?
     
  22. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    Umm what about the 308, 30-06, and 30-30? Whatever source says the 300 magnums outsell those is lying through their teeth. Nothing wrong with a 300 magnum if you are an experenced rifleman who can deal with it's bite, and have need for shots in excess of 400yd, but truth be told that kind of range is rare in the real world, over 98% of deer are shot within 200yd despite what some people would have you beleive. Big high speed magnums tend to mess up a whitetail, I like the meat so I leave the big guns to big game.
     
  23. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    Limbsavers are great, but you need more then that to make a 300 managable for your wife, though I am sure an experenced shooter like yourself could handle one. Limbsavers WILL NOT effect accuracy at all.
    I don't like muzzlebreaks, I rather deal with a bruised shoulder then have my ears ringing for the next week. My hearing is already bad enough as is. Muzzlebreaks can effect accuracy by changing the hormonics of the barrel. Not "worse" per say just different.
     
  24. idcurrie

    idcurrie Member

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    Sounds to me like you want a 30'06 and just don't know it yet.

    I have not been satisfied with Savage or Remington rifles.

    I find the Tikka is too light.

    I highly recommend the Weatherby Vanguard S2. Its weight helps mitigate recoil and I find that it actually helps make steadier offhand shots.

    The design of the action is very good. I love the one piece bolt body. If you get your rifle soaked, you simply twist the rear of the bolt off and the firing pin with spring comes out for super easy cleaning.

    The fit and finish is superior to any other rifle near the price point. The trigger on the s2 is excellent and it's guaranteed to shoot sub-moa.

    I prefer the stainless steel version but the blued version is nice and shares the same finish as the Mark V.

    You should seriously consider this rifle when making your decision.

    I have a LOT of experience in the field and I really don't think that anyone needs more than a 30'06.

    I would recommend reading this article:

    http://www.chuckhawks.com/myth_busting_calibers.htm
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  25. Kachok

    Kachok Member

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    Here we go 30-06 vs 300 Win :D
    30-06
    Advantages: Easy to work up loads, super cheap once fired brass EVERYWHERE, acceptable recoil, and more then enough punch for anything other then 1,000lbs+ dangerous game. Works much better in shorter/lighter/handier rifles then any magnum.
    300 Win Mag
    Advantages: You can down load it to 30-06 power but it does not work the other way around. The biggest advantage to me is that it makes better use of 200+gr bullets for bear/moose class game.
     
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