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Cleaning a blued gun?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by valnar, Jun 10, 2003.

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  1. valnar

    valnar Member

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    I have all stainless revolvers except one... I just bought a new-to-me S&W model 19 blued .357.

    What is the best way to clean this thing of lead in the cylinder without removing any blueing? Did I miss a FAQ on that?

    Thanks,
    Robert
     
  2. stans

    stans Member

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    Lewis lead remover works well in the barrel as well as the chambers. To get lead off the frame or the exterior of the cylinder, plain old solvent and elbow grease. Lead Away cloths do contain a mild abrasive and will remove blueing.
     
  3. valnar

    valnar Member

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    Any experience with FP-10 that I've read about?

    Robert
     
  4. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    I always remove the cylinder and let it soak in a jar of Hoppe's No. 9 while cleaning the barrel and frame. As needed, I use a bronze-bristled brush inside the window and especially around the forcing cone. I always go over the entire frame with a used tooth brush and plenty of solvent. By the time all that's clean, the crud in and around the cylinder is usually loose. I would never use a stainless brush on a blued gun; for cleaning cylinder bores, however, I've found it helps to move up one caliber, which is to say: I use a .40 caliber bronze-bristled brush to clean the cylinder bores of a .38 special or .357 magnum. Again, I use a bronze-bristled brush on the face of the cylinder and extractor, and a used tooth brush everywhere else.

    Cleaning up a used, neglected revolver is usually easier after it's been stripped to the frame and left to soak in mineral spirits a day or so.

    I never shoot .38 special loads in .357 magnum revolvers: too messy to clean afterward. I load very light .38 special loads in .357 magnum cases to make cleaning cylinder bores easier.
     
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