Desert Storm Vets

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Tierhog, Nov 4, 2005.

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  1. Tierhog

    Tierhog Member

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    The "Jarhead" thread got me to wondering who else on this forum was a Desert Storm Vet. What unit were you with, where did you go and, to keep this firearms related, what was your issue weapon?

    I was with 3/3 Task Force Taro H&S CO NBC NCOIC, USMC out of Hawaii. I carried the M16A2.

    We started out from Abu HAdriyah, then went to Ras al Mishab, played a part in Kafji, then out to the desert for the run into Kuwait International Airport.
     
  2. Darth Ruger

    Darth Ruger Member

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    VII Corps out of Germany
    M16A2
    I was in the States getting ready to reenlist when Saddam invaded Kuwait. It was obvious what was going to happen and I wanted to do my part, so I told them I would only re-up if I could get into a unit that was going to Saudi. Took a few days but they got me a slot in VII Corps in Germany. Went from California to Ft. Dix, on to Frankfurt from there, and flew into Dahran six weeks later. Stayed three weeks at Cement City, then convoyed 19 hours across the desert to Log Base Alpha, two klicks from the Saudi/Kuwait/Iraq border. Went a few times to KKMC before the fun started. Moved and went wherever it was worse than before. It was fun watching the fireworks over Baghdad at night in the weeks before the ground war started. Lived in a hole in the ground long enough to actually get comfortable with it. The downside to being stationed in Germany is that we returned to Germany when it was over, so we missed all the parades and stuff they were doing for returning soldiers here in the States, and we got a few letters from some local German liberals that didn't appreciate our efforts. As soon as we got back, they gave us a week off and we spent it drunk, then went back to work like the whole thing never happened.

    Me and two buddies got lost in the desert once overnight when we got the chance to go to a sattelite phone tent in the middle of nowhere and make a call home. Our OIC was supposed to hook up with us there after going somwhere else first, but he apparently wanted to get back early, so he left without us. When we realized he had already left, we tried to get back but it got dark too fast and we had to spend the night in the truck watching for BG's. Got back the next day and found the scumbag officer who left us there got back at the same time we were still out there waiting, and he told everyone he waited until after the time were still sitting there waiting for him, but he left hours earlier. Seems he was worried about BG's and didn't want to chance getting lost in the dark, so he left without us. A memorable episode, watching for BG's all night, but pissed at my OIC. Never trusted him after that.

    Bought some stuff from the locals, always haggling and trying to swindle you. I still have my incense burner, tea pot, head rag, other stuff. One kid tried to buy my weapon for what amounted to about $30. I still have a bunch of foreign money from Saudi, Kuwait, Iraq, Lebanon, and Egypt that I brought back with me. Colorful stuff, my kids like to look at it.

    Gulf War Syndrome is the one thing I wish I didn't bring back. No answers from the Government, or VA doctors. One doctor even refused to believe me when I explained the symptoms, said it wasn't possible. Gave up on them years ago. Fifteen years later, just living with it on my own as best I can.

    Ever been through Hafr al Batin? Poor little town with cute but scrawny kids playing in the streets, most of 'em hungry. We'd give 'em stuff from our MRE's and they'd scramble for it.

    Also worked with some British soldiers. Good guys.

    I was surprised to see this thread. Desert Storm is largely forgotten these days. A lot of people I've met don't even remember that there was a "Gulf War I". I guess it happened too fast to really stick in people's memories, or they're just not old enough to remember it.

    Did you ever have the opportunity to have a Wolfburger? :D
     
  3. silverlance

    silverlance Member

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    wow

    thanks for the great job darth, i'm deeply impressed that you volunteered when most wanted to go hide in canada or mexico.

    what exactly is gulf war syndrome? i've heard tons about it but you know how one can never trust the "veteran examples" that the newspaper and magazines have as too often they're manipulated.

    do you still have it?

    I apologize if this is too personal, I just want to know about this mysterious illness that everybody wants to say doesn't exist outside of a few crazie's heads.

    just to get things straight, i believe you.
     
  4. wingnutx

    wingnutx Member

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    I carried a charged vari-nozzle aboard the USS Proteus.
     
  5. Pilot

    Pilot Member

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    You guys are all heroes in my book. Good job. Lots of forgotten wars, thanks to the History Channel we hear about Korea and the Guld War now and then.
     
  6. Ric

    Ric Member

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    210 FA Brigade. Attached as a VII Corp asset.

    M110 8" Self Propelled Howitzer and an M203 I was Gunner/Special Weapons NCO

    [​IMG]
     
  7. nfl1990

    nfl1990 Member

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    I think that part of the problem is, is that many people these days simply don't care about history whether it happened 14.5 yrs or 1400yrs ago. Why? Well that I still can't understand.

    BTW, I didn't serve, (I was a little young,(war was declared on my 1st birthday)) I think that those who did are a special sort of people who deserve thanks rather than the derision, and insult that they normally recieve, from place like the liberqal media, and liberals themselves.
     
  8. Darth Ruger

    Darth Ruger Member

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    Deleted by Darth Ruger.
     
  9. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    i ran down to the navy recruiter and signed papers when saddam invaded kuwait.

    i ended up in the gulf aboard the uss constellation as a bt. i did not carry a weapon, nor was i issued one. i got to spend thanksgiving, x-mas, new years, etc over there. in exchange, i got a swasm medal, appreciation by a very few folks, and apathy/disdain by many.
     
  10. TFH

    TFH Member

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    You did your part and thank you for that.


    Todd
     
  11. chaim

    chaim Member

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    It may be forgotten by most Americans (along with Beruit, Grenada, Panama, Mogodeshu, etc.) but not by me.

    I wasn't there, but that wasn't by choice. I tried to go.

    I joined the Army out of high school and was at Ft Jackson for BCT during the winter of 89-90 (BTW- back then, if you were in training the last few weeks of Dec you were sent home for Xmas for 2 weeks- the day we left was the day the US invaded Panama). Anyway, it turned out I had a bad ankle, not bad enough for a discharge due to the ankle but bad enough that I missed passing the run on the PT test by 17 seconds. Well, the Berlin Wall came down while I was in BCT and it was obvious cuts were coming. So, my CO (can't remember if it was battalion or brigade level) decided no waivers for trainees.

    So, I was ELS (Entry Level Separation) in Feb 1990. Well, with ELS you have to wait 2 years before you have a chance to go back in. During Desert Shield I remember the talking heads talking casualties in the 10s of thousands and I felt the tug of duty to country. I went to the local Army recruiters to try to go back in, they tried everything they could, but there was no way around the 2 year wait before I could try going back.

    So, if it wasn't for 17 sec on the run I would have been there (even if the Reserve unit I joined hadn't been called up I would have volunteered). Even with that discharge, if it was just a year later I would have been there (as it was I tried to join back up, and I would have insisted on a unit that was going over). Which all adds up to the bottom line of, I didn't go but wanted to (not that I want to go to war, but some strange thing happens to me whenever our troops go into harms way- I feel like I'm supposed to be there with them).
     
  12. Harry Paget Flashman

    Harry Paget Flashman Member

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    I'd already been in for 25 years and spent my time in the Gulf aboard USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55) as CICO. I carried a gas mask and a ballpoint pen.
     
  13. TimboKhan

    TimboKhan Member

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    1/7, Bravo Company, USMC. I carried an A2, but I was a machinegunner, so in theory I carried a 60 too.
     
  14. dakotasin

    dakotasin Member

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    tfh- much appreciated!
     
  15. KriegHund

    KriegHund Member

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    Forgotten war indeed.

    Just cause we kicked his butt doesnt mean there werent men out there fighitng...
     
  16. Hook686

    Hook686 Member

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    hmmm
     
  17. Hook686

    Hook686 Member

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    I think this an interesting thead. I was involved in USAF secret operations back in the 60's ... the Cold War. A lot of that war is unknown, unremembered, and highly distorted. I was involved with weapons of mass destruction. I was a nuclear chemistry technician. I was "nuked" in an accident at the laboratory I worked in stateside. However, the lab, being a secret operation, was not there ... its existence was itself secret. So, a troop cannot be injured at a place that does not exist. A decade ago, the Commander of the parent organization of the laboratory acknowledged that I was in fact contaminated with plutonium, in an incident that occured, while on active duty. I think sometimes of the field operatives, and the "silent" risks they are exposed to ... kinda like some of the troops that burned chemical agents in Gulf I ... the grunts get the nasty jobs, while those that are informed go elsewhere.

    Nukes are pretty big guns, with some long term results. Saddam did not have any, but we do. Unfortunately it seems the US is moving towards smaller and smaller nuclear payloads. The grunt on the ground gets to carry, live with and deploy these small tactical nuclear weapons.

    I think ground troops ought stick with M16a2'S.

    Hook686

    99125/1155thTOS/1035thFAG/USAFTAC
     
  18. Lennyjoe

    Lennyjoe Member

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    I left Myrtle Beach 30 days before they deployed their A-10's. I PCS'd to Germany and had to watch it all on tv.

    Missed out on the 1st one but spent many a months in Kuwait supporting the southern no-fly zone.
     
  19. sp40cal

    sp40cal Member

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    Thank you very, very much. God bless All of you.

    sp40cal
     
  20. goalie

    goalie Member

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    2nd Tank Bn. Task Force Ripper. I was an 0352 at the time: TOW missile gunner.
     
  21. tailgunner

    tailgunner Member In Memoriam

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    Quad 50s on B-52s. Flew out of Fairford, England.
     
  22. Taipei Personality

    Taipei Personality Member

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    Spent the war in Germany, removing and shipping F-15 parts to our sister squadrons in Saudi. Went to Saudi after the war as part of enforcing the southern no-fly. Stayed in Khobar Towers- private room, private bath, air conditioning. Deepened my already deep respect for those on the pointy end of the spear. Thanks, guys, for your sacrifices.
     
  23. Hobie

    Hobie Member

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    I was serving as a FTM-AGR Readiness NCO in an infantry company. We'd been pushing for years to build our unit. Thought we'd go, maybe, even as light infantry. Didn't happen. The unit has been deployed since 9/11 and three currently serving have been deployed 4 times since 9/11. Me, I'm now retired after 27½ years. I guess my weapons were my mind, my pencil and my computer. :rolleyes:
     
  24. crucible

    crucible Member

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    I was a 21 year old Lance Corporal with 2nd Med (USMC), and filled a billet as an M997 ambulance driver driving doc's and wounded around, seeing alot of the country(s), before, during and following holstilities. Detached from the parent company, my little group as a forward aid station with in with the main attack in several hours nnw of AL Jubayl-where we came in country.

    Never fired a shot in anger, but I can't say the reverse is true (getting mortered sucks..even if inaccurate).

    Got lost in the oil fire lit darkness of the first night in a convoy, I hit something (we later figured a mine or some other munition that didn't off in total) that made the right side of vehicle go up about a foot up in the air and shred both tires...thankfully, the inner aluminum runstop rims allowed me and my now scared ????less doc's to steer all the way to the left and go straight ahead @5mph or so, eventually catching up to the rest of convoy which stopped some ways away to wagon-wheel for the evening.

    We took 40-60 POW's those first few days, and our doc's with us and in the rear treated them with as much care and professionalism as could be done.

    Went into MOPP-4 following real gas alerts many times before and during...like the guy in "Airplane" , I picked the wrong time try and quit smoking. I hated, hated to be woken up with folks screaming "gas! gas! MOPP-4! NO f-ing drill!" out of a sound sleep at night.

    Did I mention I hated that?

    I dunno about Gulf War syndrome, but we all coughed lots of up black stuff from the oil fire, it's smoke and the black rain. Not to mention those pills (anthrax and pre-nerve agent exposure IIRC)-which made quite a few sick from them alone. My medical history has been interesting however: heart attack and diagnosed with diabetes at the grand old age of 31-with no medical history of either and no direct cause ever found. (Anyone ever run into those piles of dead sheep-with no obvious wounds? Or remember the chem folks with those Czech vehicles having real nerve agent detection alerts on comms?)

    I also have a best friend, also Marine, buried in Arlington from service in that conflict.

    I haven't forgotten.

    C-
     
  25. Souris

    Souris Member

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    Samuel B. Roberts FFG-58.

    :)
     
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