Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Does anyone eat Marmot?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by GJgo, Aug 24, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. GJgo

    GJgo Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    966
    Location:
    Western Colorado
    Well folks, it's marmot season here in CO. Thinking about going after a few to warm up for big game season. Save for prairie dogs & coyotes I like to eat what I shoot. So, are they worth eating? Any recipes? Thanks :)
     
  2. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Messages:
    23,171
  3. HighExpert

    HighExpert Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Messages:
    496
    Location:
    Daytona
    I don't know but I killed a ground hog this last weekend and couldn't quite bring myself to try it. He WAS burrowing under my house and had to go.
     
  4. GJgo

    GJgo Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    966
    Location:
    Western Colorado
    Any place I'd go to take them would be over 10,000', and I'd think anything they're eating up there should make them taste better than their low lying counterparts!
     
  5. birdshot8's

    birdshot8's Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2008
    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    north platte, ne
    I worked with a Navajo man on a job last summer. We were going through a large prarie dog town, when he said, he wished we could stop, so he could shoot a couple for supper. i thought he was pulling my leg, but he insisted they were tasty. I questioned him about possible deceases, and he explained his method for preparing the PD for the table.
     
  6. ArmedBear

    ArmedBear Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2005
    Messages:
    23,171
    I talked with a guy who managed a mine in the desert for a while. He was playing around with a .22-250 early in the morning before work started, shooting jackrabbits, and some Navajo guys said that, if he collected them, they'd get the stuff ready and make a feast.

    They cooked a stew with jackrabbits, spices and vegetables in a big pot over an open fire all day, now and then checking on it and stirring. When quitting time came, he said it smelled wonderful and tasted even better. It's all about knowing how to cook something -- most people wouldn't touch desert jackrabbit, because they think it tastes awful.
     
  7. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2003
    Messages:
    3,366
    If you're hungry enough, have enough ketchup, a person can eat about anything.

    The French are well known for eating parts of animals most people throw away, may explain why they cook using heavy sauces and wine.
     
  8. DIM

    DIM Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,032
    They probably can be cooked same way as squirrels, thing is I don't eat squirrels and I don't touch woodchucks either, but squirrels are popular eating and I just never got myself so hungry to eat one...
     
  9. armoredman

    armoredman Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Messages:
    16,434
    Location:
    proud to be in AZ
    Louisiana Hot Sauce, made even Navy food taste good. :)
     
  10. Floppy_D

    Floppy_D Member In Memoriam

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2007
    Messages:
    2,156
    Location:
    NAS Pensacola
    It still does. :D
    I've heard of folks eating groundhog because it was "grass-fed" like good beef.
     
  11. ~z

    ~z Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2005
    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    High plains of Texas
    AB, that is correct, it IS pretty good stuff. I'm headed back to Mongolia next week and look forward to a heaping helpin of boodog. Amazing people over there
    ~z
     
  12. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    7,392
    Location:
    all over Virginia
    Tastes just like chicken... If you drink enough Tequila.
     
  13. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    7,388
    Location:
    Alabama
    Well,my dad did get that hungry. During the great depression(dad was just a kid) my grand dad killed any ground hog (no marmots around here) possum or raccoon he found and my grandmother would bake it. Anything that COULD be eaten was. There was no choice other than starvation.
     
  14. FLAvalanche

    FLAvalanche Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2010
    Messages:
    810
    Location:
    Port Charlotte, Florida
    How big to those things get? About the size of a groundhog?
     
  15. Joe Demko

    Joe Demko Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2002
    Messages:
    6,523
    Location:
    Just two minutes from sanity.
    Some folks around here eat groundhogs which are a species of marmot (Marmota monax). I've tried them and they were somewhat similar to squirrel, although larger. Key to their preparation is the removal of fatty scent glands from the critter's "arm pits." Last time I had it, the carcass was soaked overnight in salt water. It was then cut up, dredged in seasoned flour and fried. The pieces were then arranged in a glass baking dish, covered with canned spaghetti sauce and baked in a 350 degree oven with foil over the dish until the meat was fork tender. It was actually pretty tasty.
     
  16. DIM

    DIM Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,032
    Just checked Wiki, yes they all Genus Marmot, Sub-genus Marmota, either ground hog or woodchuck or just plain Marmot, and yes Mongolian seemed to like them, but I think I'll pass ;-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marmota
     
  17. moosehunt

    moosehunt Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    Messages:
    893
    I see where no one that has actually eaten them (Marmots) has answered. Well, that now ends. I've eaten them (from CO for that matter). First off, I selected relatively young ones, but that was cansidering tenderness, not flavor. Skinning them cleanly is a bit of a challenge, because their burrowing life style makes them a bit "dirty", meaning just plain old dirt in the fur. I found the best way was to wash them off well in a creek, then skin them while still wet--it kind of helps capture loose hair. Once skinned then eviserate as a rabbit or any other mammal. There is a gland (eluded to by someone earlier) under each forefoot (armpit) that should be removed. No big deal, it's kind of tanish color, easily seen, easily removed. I cut them up like a rabbit and fried them--pretty good, but chewy. So I tried pre-cooking them a bit in a preasure cooker, then frying. Much better. They are quite good. I've also made stew out of them--excellent, maybeso better than fried. At any rate, edibility is good. Big ones are quite tough (chewy). When I lived in CO there was no season or limit, as there is now. I've eaten many of them, and not because I was starving. They are fine fare! Try it. You'll like it! Good Luck!

    Forgot to mention that I mostly only ate head shot ones--easier/cleaner to dress out.
     
  18. caribou

    caribou Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Messages:
    1,582
    Location:
    North West Alaska
    Sriksrikpuk as they are called here are delicious.
    Grasses and Herbs, berrys and flowers from the Tundra make the meat very mild and tatsey with LOTS of fat between the layers. Mmmmmmmm juicy and awsome.
    I cook em split in half and roasted over coals. Salt n pepper and your good to go. I personally carry Tiger Sauce, its great on most any dark meat.

    We get them up on mountain sides, in the rocks.
    I head shoot them with my M-39, usually at much less than 50 yards, they are very wary.
     
  19. GJgo

    GJgo Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    966
    Location:
    Western Colorado
    Heh thanks for the first hand experience guys. I'd wager the adult ones I see up in the high country are in the neighborhood of 20 lbs walking, big fat critters. Have to be as cold as it gets up there. With any luck I'll report back after the hunt. :)
     
  20. bad_aim_billy

    bad_aim_billy Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    248
    Location:
    Mountain West
    I've had marmot--shot a fat one and put it in the crockpot with barbeque sauce and spices, along with onions. Tastes a lot like pork, but the meat is quite dark. Very tasty overall.
     
  21. Red Cent

    Red Cent Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,400
    Location:
    McLeansville, NC by way of WV SASS 29170L
    Notice my origins. Still have my teeth and I don't chew. Don't fool around with cousins.
    Whistle pig hunting in WV is a pasttime welcomed by the farmers and most anybody else. I was raised in a rural part of WV. Putnam County. 18 Mile Creek.
    Later, when I would go for a pig hunt, Mom (grandmother) would say bring me back a young'n and we will cook it. Cooked it like a chuck roast after soaking all night in vinegar and water. Downright delicious. Tasted like chuck roast.
    We did not shoot until after May 15. Did not want to leave little ones to starve in the ground. Around July was the best time to harvest pot fare.
    Remember a few high knolls that I have carried the cannon (13# 22-250) up and bedded down with two friends. A jug and a ....a....uhhh friend. Memories.

    Yes, we ate squirrels. Mom would par boil the squirrel parts, including the head. Make a white pepper gravy out of the broth and put them together. Take the handle of a butter knife, crack the skull open and it was squirrel pate'. Very good.

    Rabbits we usually fried. Roll in flour, and fry in the water from boiling the potatoes. After they were fried add a little flour and milk to the crispins and you had the best gravy, even better than Jeb's and Grannie's.
     
  22. sscoyote

    sscoyote Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    347
    Tried it fried in the old days and it was too tough to eat. But i'm eating jackrabbit these days the wife cooks in the crockpot, and it's as good as any other wild game i've ate. I'm sure the chucks would be just as good--

    [​IMG]
     
  23. ThePunisher'sArmory

    ThePunisher'sArmory Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Messages:
    888
    Location:
    Belleville, Il
    Now Ive never got the chance to shoot one but if I did I would use a .223. Now If one was shot at less that 100yrds what would really be left to eat????? Seems to me it would explode in a grand spray of blood, bone, and metal. (sorry to get so graphic :D)
     
  24. jaybirdjtski

    jaybirdjtski Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2009
    Messages:
    35
    Let's see.....steroid fed meat, pesticide laden veggies, salmonella in eggs, e coli in lettuce. The media has you fooled. What you have to worry about is what is being sold in Safeway. Eating a marmot would certainly be better for you than say, a Big Mac, fries and a Coke. People eat muskrat, possum, rabbit, squirrel, porcupine, alligator, snakes, grubs, grasshoppers, moose nose, etc. I love bear but to hear some folks talk you would think that it would make you sick. Tastes like the best pork you have ever eaten. Heck! Saw a show the other night and the ultimate delicacy was maggot-laden cheese!

    My guess is that cooked correctly, a marmot would be delicious. Probably a high fat content so you would cook accordingly.
     
  25. General Tso

    General Tso member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2009
    Messages:
    386
    Location:
    Ohio
    Marmot

    I'm too much of a softie to pull the trigger. I couldn't do it.
     

    Attached Files:

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page