Quantcast

Duffle cut stock repair

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by GunnyUSMC, Jul 22, 2020.

  1. GunnyUSMC

    GunnyUSMC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    7,126
    Location:
    Denham Springs LA
    Some may ask , what is a duffle cut or why is it called a duffle cut.
    During WWII many guns were brought home from the war. Back then you didn’t have to fill out paperwork to bring or send a gun home. G.I.’s and Marines would just bring them home in their Duffle bags, most often. The problem was that most rifles were to long to fit into a Duffle bag so, they would take the barreled action out of the stock and cut the stock at the rear barrel band. This way the stock and barreled action would fit in the bag.
    Many of these rifles were put back together without making repairs to the stocks. Some were repaired good and some not so good. The problem with repairing Duffle cut stocks is making sure that everything fits when the repairs art done. The main issue I’d the missing wood from the saw cut. I have repaired some that were missing as much as 1/4 inch of wood.
    Some repairs require that you replace the missing wood and some you don’t have to. In this topic I’ll show two repairs where one will have the wood added and the other not.

    Here’s the first victim is an Italian M41 Infantry rifle. This is one that will need the missing wood replaced because there is a band spring that holds the rear barrel band in place.
    3AAA6621-BC0B-4C91-BF52-26E5CB100CEC.jpeg

    The hard part is figuring out how thick you will need to make the replacement piece. It’s best to cut it a little thicker and then trim it to fit.
    E703E317-C3C7-4E54-998B-C9C30B65ABE0.jpeg

    I cut several slices of wood from an old stock and got one that was very close.
    484DB853-D4A4-41E3-B8AB-06ACA84AF635.jpeg

    I then used epoxy to attach the piece to the stock. I sat a weight on top of the piece while the epoxy cured.
    643582D6-D5B3-4F81-9A78-10549DD3F6AF.jpeg 5F7D293B-0435-4405-8BEB-A7FB54ADE00C.jpeg 8CE29CE5-F171-4E37-8A53-E884BDC53302.jpeg

    After the epoxy cured, I trimmed the piece so that the barrel band would fit and cut the slot for the band spring.
    The next part can get a little tricky. This is figuring out where to drill your dowel holes. O this stock I had to avoid the cleaning rod channel and the band spring slot.
    7EAC2418-53A8-4929-9D49-F4C49F89380D.jpeg

    I marked the stock and drilled two 1/4 inch holes for the dowels. I then inserted marking studs to mark where I would drill the holes on the front half.
    63E24086-3585-4D45-A653-8089402FE77D.jpeg

    EA2DAB29-7683-4011-84E5-3D277C478CE1.jpeg

    Getting these holes just right can be a challenge, even when you have the barreled action. This is simply to over come by drilling your holes just a little over sized.
    Here you see one hole drilled and if you look close, you can see the mark for the other hole.
    35CBCDB9-8F25-4BDC-88CF-DA79E3D2C58D.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2020
    bannockburn and 1KPerDay like this.
  2. GunnyUSMC

    GunnyUSMC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    7,126
    Location:
    Denham Springs LA
    Next is to test fit the parts to make sure that they lie up.
    DADA2C50-4E16-4F54-BEAB-12D32D984BD6.jpeg

    Once things are Lind up, I applied some wax to the outside of the stock to keep the epoxy resin from getting on places I didn’t want it.
    F91ED7A7-9F58-42BD-A49B-1A38B299630D.jpeg

    Even applied wax into the band spring slot.
    367E9CED-2CD3-4F83-B25A-65EB3889E7AF.jpeg

    Next the epoxy was mixed and applied to the stock. The barreled action was put into the stock After the parts were put together, and tapped in place.
    86351744-FC75-4225-80E9-389FD8B8D005.jpeg B6635D56-AD27-4274-8395-F59B01DF2B96.jpeg

    Here it is after the epoxy was cured. No it is time to dress up the repair.
    70D8EEA9-5BE8-41CB-B28D-73245D5E7E17.jpeg 9DB4962C-78DE-43D0-8FBA-5862F1CC9B21.jpeg 85647582-7CF9-4D23-966F-53A1127A0E96.jpeg
     
  3. shootstraight57

    shootstraight57 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2012
    Messages:
    329
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Nice work. I believe this is one of those lost arts that many people wish they can do!
     
  4. GunnyUSMC

    GunnyUSMC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    7,126
    Location:
    Denham Springs LA
    To dress up the repair I mixed some sanding dust with some epoxy resin and applied it to the stock. Once ti was cured, I used hand files to dress up the repair.
    9875F87E-AF00-49F6-AC7E-FD0BAB80CAA5.jpeg 8A64B8CD-E942-4096-A316-BC7FBDE35675.jpeg 73FDA6D4-6862-400B-A72E-5CD7D37CAD55.jpeg FE6DA18F-74EB-404B-9DB4-4F0CDDEC6B1E.jpeg


    A little stain was used to help blend the repair. 569CCC00-57CC-4061-8897-1151698C34DD.jpeg 9760A5CD-FEE8-4C45-9059-4824A9D70096.jpeg 3A6128AE-5F04-49F5-9AC9-F723C8D872D2.jpeg

    And here it is all finished. Tom’s 1/3 Mix was applied after the repairs were done.
    29BFCAE3-FDFE-4B63-A92A-01435ABD4D5C.jpeg 08AF3B91-130E-4475-89E6-47D66DE1928A.jpeg
     
    EMC45, LoonWulf, total recoil and 2 others like this.
  5. GunnyUSMC

    GunnyUSMC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    7,126
    Location:
    Denham Springs LA
    Here’s the second repair on a Belgian M1889 Mauser.
    The holes were drilled.
    F52494DE-F442-41C4-AF18-95DBF93D6256.jpeg

    Dowels and epoxy added.
    9211B9DD-3371-46BB-9E7F-E446AEF3F8C9.jpeg 7D44576F-9803-4DAC-B0B6-7816E56402D7.jpeg 22764B5D-3086-4276-81D2-A7EC8A2C486A.jpeg

    Barrel jacket used to line everything up and then tapped in place.
    B30DA31D-ADA7-4E68-9C0C-E8085B39794E.jpeg 24295A41-2B3C-44D6-BEA8-3D8695F2814E.jpeg 34BD610E-6732-43F3-9B2D-D6F5269E5280.jpeg

    Final fitting.
    3DFA4EA0-363C-4F41-B625-B396148E3A4B.jpeg

    Re- drilling the hole fro the cleaning rod.
    10C30E4E-5CDC-4C14-BE31-93C8D1D6D88A.jpeg

    All finished.
    75F6E7A3-35CE-4733-9753-486938FA3175.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2020
    EMC45, LoonWulf, total recoil and 3 others like this.
  6. GunnyUSMC

    GunnyUSMC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    7,126
    Location:
    Denham Springs LA
    And all back together.
    65CAB12E-EF63-4AC4-B6FE-0D29BB1170FD.jpeg 5CBA143B-51C6-4586-8ED2-756DF2A49308.jpeg 7EF9C6D9-048F-4679-A7F4-28BB82434E34.jpeg 10588C12-A6E1-4ACF-923C-910A2DED0CD9.jpeg
     
  7. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    21,734
    Gunny

    Amazing work! You would never guess, just be looking at both rifles, the extent you went to make those repairs!
     
  8. Bitrclngr

    Bitrclngr Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2019
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    The Peoples Republic of Illinois
    Both rifles the rifles are mine and I'm happy they have been fixed. I bought both rifles about 3 years ago. I knew the Carcano M41 was cut when I bought it at a gunshow. The Belgian M1889 was an online auction find lumped together with a sporterized Argentine Mauser. I was unaware of the duffle cut until I had it in hand. It didn't bother me that it was cut and the bore is excellent. I can't thank gunny enough for all he's done for me over the years.
     
  9. GunnyUSMC

    GunnyUSMC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    7,126
    Location:
    Denham Springs LA
    That’s what friends do Matt.
    You forgot to tell them that I really don’t like doing Duffle cut repairs.
     
    LoonWulf likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice