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Fake WWII John EK

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by rcmodel, Nov 10, 2012.

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  1. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I put this one together for a guy who found the old 6" sticker blade with no handle at a flea market.

    The sheath it was in was WWII vintage or older, but badly dry-rotted.
    I salvaged the oval head rivets out of the old sheath and re-used them to make the new sheath.

    Just so it won’t ever be mistaken for a real WWII John Ek in years to come?

    1. I marked the blade plainly & deeply with my initials & the date I made it.

    2. The scales were made from a hickory hammer handle, scorched with a torch, instead of the rock maple John Ek always used.

    3. I attached them with poured Babbitt metal “rivets” instead of the poured aluminum rivets John Ek used.

    4. The handle and skull cracker projection is shorter then a real John Ek would ever have been.

    Anyway, he was real happy with the knife, and I was pretty happy with the $50 bucks he paid me for doing it.

    FakeJohnEK1.jpg

    FakeJohnEK2.jpg

    FakeJohnEK3.jpg


    rc
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  2. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    Cool

    If you'd never seen one and you weren't a student of them you'd never know.

    BTW, John Ek used lead instead of aluminum for the rivets.
     
  3. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    I've seen pretty reliable references to both.

    I really don't know which is right.

    Or maybe both are?

    At any rate, my fake ones were neither one, exactly!

    rc
     
  4. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    The Ek company website only refers to the lead ones, but if you were a troop with the ability to melt aluminum I don't doubt that you'd melt John Ek's lead ones out and try to improve on things with aluminum.

    Since Gary Ek is still alive it might be easy to find out. I'll send an email to him and share the results (assuming he bothers to respond).
     
  5. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Thanks!

    I'd be interested to know what you find out.

    All I know for sure is:
    M. H. Coles Book III "U. S. Military Knives" says Poured Aluminum rivets.

    Michael W. Silvey in "Military Knives, a Reference" says Poured Lead rivets.

    I've never seen or handled enough real ones to form a semi-educated opinion.

    rc
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2012
  6. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Thanks again.

    I'll check it out.

    rc
     
  8. Deltaboy1984

    Deltaboy1984 Member

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    Cool Knife work.
     
  9. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    I finally heard back from Gary Ek about the rivets -

     
  10. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Well o.k. then.
    Thanks!

    I guess my using 80% lead, 15% antimony, 5% tin Babbitt metal was a pretty good choice then!

    rc
     
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