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First time poster has a jump question

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by saskboy, Oct 15, 2008.

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  1. saskboy

    saskboy Member

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    Hey everybody! Im a first time poster from Saskatoon Saskatchewan. I have been reloading for about a month now and have a question for you guys. How much jump are you giving your bullets, I have all mine set what is recommended by my hornady manual and having excellent results. I want to start fine tuning my ammo now and am so impressed with reloads that I gave my factory ammo away because its so dissapointing to shoot with now that I am used to reloads :barf: . Thanks in advance for the replys!
     
  2. LJH

    LJH Member

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    Well that is a tricky question. One of my rifles likes .02 another does best with a whopping .08. That is part of the fun of working up the loads.
     
  3. The Bushmaster

    The Bushmaster Member

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    Each individual rifle is different and will perform differently to various bullet jump distances. Like LJH said.

    You will have to figure it out for each rifle. But that's why we reload.
     
  4. Tune_up

    Tune_up Member

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    Sorry to hijack the thread with a stupid question but I'm new to reloading and haven't been able to determine, How do you measure the "jump" or distance to the lands? I assume there is a gauge but all I can find are "go/no go" gauges and I don't see how that will help(with this question).
     
  5. BigBlack

    BigBlack Member

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    Hornady Lock n Load Bullet Comparator is what I use.
     
  6. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    The old time, tried & true method is to long seat a bullet, smoke it with candle soot, and keep trying it in the rifle.

    Seat it slightly deeper each time, re-smoke it, and try it again until the rifling no longer scrapes off the candle soot.

    There are guages made to do the same thing, but I'm still not convenced they do it any better.

    And they certainly can't do it any cheaper!

    http://www.precisionreloading.com/stoneypoint.htm

    rcmodel
     
  7. MCMXI

    MCMXI Member

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    +1 but I use the Hornady (formerly Stoney Point) OAL gauge with modified cases as well.

    Repeatability is the key here. You may have to make numerous readings before you get the "feel" for it. I have LNL cases for .223, .308, .300 WM and .300 WSM and have measured four chambers with a number of different bullets. Hornady mentions a technique of using a dowel in the barrel to put pressure on the tip of the bullet so that you can feel the contact point. I've found that to be an ok technique but due to the possibility of forcing the bullet into the lands I prefer the technique of VERY gently pushing the bullet forward while making sure to keep the case from backing out and feeling the instant the ogive contacts the lands. Either way, once you get the feel, the results are repeatable and you can be confident that your measurements are accurate.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2008
  8. GP100man

    GP100man Member

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    i take a dark magic marker & color the bullet or boolit .
    back off enuff for reliable feeding.

    GP100man
     
  9. Larry E

    Larry E Member

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    If you want the loads to feed through a magazine that pretty much determines how far out the bullet can be seated. Otherwise it can be seated out to engage the rifling like has been explained. Don't work up a load with the bullet off the rifling then seat it into the rifling though as excessive pressures could be produced. Otherwise move the bullet in and out until you get the best accuracy.
     
  10. saskboy

    saskboy Member

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    thanks for the replys, I guess ill have to experiment :D
     
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